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IHE Network

Background

The Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) Network was established to share knowledge among the institutions of higher learning in Southeast Wisconsin likely to contribute teachers to the Milwaukee Public Schools. This work is done in direct alignment with major goals of the MMP, focusing on building and sustaining a solid pool of teachers that understand mathematics and use that knowledge to improve student learning for children within the Milwaukee area.

Institutions of Higher Learning that are part of the Network include

  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Milwaukee Area Technical College
  • Marquette University
  • Alverno College
  • University of Wisconsin-Waukesha
  • Milwaukee School of Engineering
  • University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
  • University of Wisconsin-Parkside
  • Cardinal Stritch University
  • Carroll College
  • Mount Mary College
  • Carthage College
  • Concordia University
  • Lakeland College
  • Wisconsin Lutheran College
  • Waukesha County Technical College

The IHE Network will focus its efforts on the following 3 topics:

  • Preparing Urban Mathematics Teachers

Milwaukee, the Midwest “City of Colleges,” has many programs for preparing teachers, with UWM preparing the largest number of teachers for MPS. In the past three years, UWM certified over 40% of early childhood/elementary teachers and over 30% of high school math teachers hired in MPS. With its urban education mission and close partnership to the district, UWM will focus heavily on the redesign of the mathematical preparation of urban teachers and provide the lead for the IHE Network for mathematics. This work will be centered on research efforts targeting teacher learning through multiple measures and based on national research and professional recommendations highlighted in TheMathematical Education of Teachers (hereafter, MET) (CBMS, 2001) and Adding It Up (NRC, 2001a) reports.

The IHE Network will take on focused projects identified through ongoing needs assessments, such as the improvement of the mathematical content knowledge of elementary teachers. Network participants (college faculty and staff in mathematics and education, PK-12 teachers, district curriculum and assessment specialists) will meet approximately four times per year to (1) examine the Wisconsin licensing standards centered on performance measures; (2) prepare teachers to connect the learning of challenging mathematics to urban classrooms; and (3) conduct research on students’ mathematics performance. Early engagement has started through a state Eisenhower project and an earlier NSF initiative.

  • Developing the Math Knowledge Needed for Quality Teaching

Quality teachers need mathematics courses that develop in-depth understanding of the challenging mathematics they will teach (CBMS, 2001; Ma, 1999; National Commission on Math and Science Teaching for the 21st Century, 2000; NCTM, 1991; NRC, 2001b; Wilson, Floden, & Ferrini-Mundy, 2001; Manouchehri, 1997; Papick, Beem, Reys, & Reys, 1999; Simon & Blume, 1994). Acknowledging that the current training is not adequate, we will work towards improved PK-12 teacher preparation.

Design teams of mathematicians, mathematics educators, teachers, and teachers-in-residence will collaborate to improve the mathematical preparation of PK-12 teachers. Focused work includes (1) preparation of prospective teachers with a deep understanding of the mathematical content needed for teaching in alignment to MET and NRC (2001a) recommendations, the Wisconsin mathematics standards, and the mathematics framework, and informed by UWM’s urban mission; and (2) utilization of the IHE Network for Teacher Preparation in mathematics to inform the redesign of the mathematical preparation of teachers at UWM, MATC, and colleges throughout the metropolitan area.

  • Ensuring Successful College Transition and Challenging Mathematics Curricula

The IHE Network initiative will engage mathematics faculty from UWM, MATC, and other universities and colleges along with high school mathematics teachers and guidance counselors to align challenging mathematics (i.e. Advanced Placement) courses for MPS students with the preparation of students for entry to higher education. The goal is not only a reduction in the number of students assigned to remedial mathematics courses in college, but a strong foundation for students to be successful at all levels.

 

IHE Resources

UWM & MATC Mathematics Course Equivalencies Comparision Sheet word document

 

Past Events

21st annual Marden Lecture on Mathematics, Wednesday April 28, 2010 from 4-5 p.m.

This Marden Lecture featured Roger Howe of Yale University. Dr. Howe gave a presentation entitled "Symmetry: More Than Pretty Pictures". In it, he reviewed the phenomena, concepts and history of symmetry, and concluded with some observations about symmetry's role in scientific development.

View Flyer PDF document

Jerry Murdoch lecture, Friday, April 16, 2010, from 4:30-5:30 pm.

Are you interested in high school mathematics curricula? Jerry Murdoch, the principal author of "Discovering Algebra" and "Discovering Advanced Algebra", recently selected by Milwaukee Public Schools as the district-wide curriculum, spoke in the UW-Milwaukee Department of Mathematical Sciences (room E495A).  This was an excellent opportunity to talk with Jerry about his philosophy of teaching mathematics, and the curricular and pedagogical decisions that went into the design of the books.  

View Flyer PDF document

Kepner Becomes President of NCTM

kepner accepting gavel at NCTMDr. Henry Kepner, one of the founders of the MMP and a key leader in the IHE Network, became the latest president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), in a ceremony at the Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, April 7-12, 2008.

Kepner, a Professor of Mathematics and Education at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, will now serve a two-year term as President and one-year term as Past President as spokesman for the organization after assuming duties last year as President-Elect. It is an enormous honor both to Dr. Kepner and to Milwaukee to have him serve this capacity. Congratulations Dr. Kepner!

 

The Mathematical Preparation of Middle School Teachers of Mathematics at the Wisconsin Mathematics Council Annual Meeting; Friday May 2, 2008 -- 8:00-11:00 am

This workshop, built from the successful conference The Mathematical Preparation of Middle School Teachers of Mathematics: a Wisconsin Concern, held in Wisconsin Dells last October, presented two visions for the mathematical preparation of teachers at the middle grades.

Download Announcement Flyer Word document

WMC Conference Registration Form PDF document

Green Lake Conference Center Food/Lodging Form PDF document

Math Colloquium, Monday, November 26, 2007--1:00 p.m.

Math Colloquium at Marquette University, Monday, November 26, 2007, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 401 of Katharine Reed Cudahy Hall. Marta Magiera of Illinois Institute of Technology, will give a presentation entitled Metacognition in Solving Complex Problems: A Case Study of Situations and Circumstances that Prompt Metacognitive Behaviors. Ms. Magiera is a candidate for a mathematics education faculty position at Marquette University.

For additional information on this event, please contact Dr. Jack Moyer, phone (414) 288-5299, or e-mail johnm@mscs.mu.edu

 

Math Colloquium, Wednesday, November 28, 2007--1:00 p.m.

Math Colloquium at Marquette University, Wednesday, November 28, 2007, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 401 of Katharine Reed Cudahy Hall. Jennifer Kaminski of the Ohio State University will give a presentation entitled Promoting Transfer of Mathematical Knowledge. Ms. Kaminski is a candidate for a mathematics education faculty position at Marquette University.

For additional information on this event, please contact Dr. Jack Moyer, phone (414) 288-5299, or e-mail johnm@mscs.mu.edu

IHE-DPI Joint Conference, October 5-6, 2007

"Mathematical Preparations for Middle School Teachers of Mathematics: A Wisconsin Concern"

Conference Announcement Word document

Expense Details Word document

Work Groups Word document

Final Agenda Word document

S.Nickerson, "Reconceptualizing Mathematics: Courses for Prospective and Practicing Teachers" Powerpoint Presentation

S.Nickerson, "Reconceptualizing Mathematics Revisited: Prespectives and Views on Building and Delivering a Coherent Program" Powerpoint Presentation

Huinker, McLeod, "The MCEA Math Minor at UWM" Powerpoint Presentation

Summary of MP Powerpoint Presentation

Marden Lecture, April 27, 2007 at 4 pm - University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

UWM's April Marden Lecture featured David Keyes of Columbia University. Dr. Keyes gave a presentation entitled "Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing". The Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative is a set of interconnected projects--science, software development, and research directed toward the latter--designed to support simulation, data exploration, and collaboration in many thrust areas of the U.S. Department of Energy, including: climate modeling, fusion energy, chemistry and materials science, astrophysics, and high energy and particle physics. The lecture briefly reviewed the sweep of SciDAC and then focuses on some particular advances in the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program.

Download Flyer PDF document

Math Colloquium - February 21, 2007 at 1 pm - Marquette University

Denise Forrest of The Ohio State University-Newark gave a presentation entitled "Re-searching Mathematics Teachers' Verbal Communication." Ms. Forrest is a candidate for a mathematics education faculty position with Marquette University. The presentation was Wednesday, February 21, 2007, at Marquette University.

Download Flyer Word document

Mathematics Colloquium, February 2, 2007, 4 pm, Marquette University

Chris Hruska of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee gave a presentation entitled "Nonpositively Curved Spaces with Isolated Flats." The event was sponsored by Marquette's Dept. of Mathematics, Statistics
and Computer Science.

Mathematics Colloquium, January 19, 2007, 1pm, Marquette University

Tetyana Berezovski of Simon Fraser University, Canada, gave a presentation entitled "Towards
Effective Teaching: The Case for Logarithms." Ms. Berezovski is a candidate for a mathematics education faculty position with Marquette University. She has focused her research on examination of pre-service and in-service teachers’ understanding of logarithms and logarithmic functions and to explore how their understanding influences their choices of the approaches to teaching these concepts. Research supplies consistent evidence that teachers' conceptions of mathematics strongly impact their instructional practice. In addition, research findings confirm that teachers' instructional practices, especially in mathematics, reflect the teachers' conceptions of the subject matter.

Download Flyer Word document

Mathematics Colloquium, October 20, 2006, 4pm, University of Wisconsin-Miwlaukee

"NCTM Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Mathematical Analysis and Perspective on U.S. Mathematics Education" by Henry S. Kepner, Jr., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Dr. Kepner discussed the recently released Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. His talk focused on the document's relevance in American school mathematics, and examined the recommendations of the Curriculum Focal Points and its intended purpose. He also brought to attention varied commentaries and editorials appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and other national media, and how these relate to the historical context of school mathematics in the US and contrast this context to approaches in other countries.

Download Flyer PDF document

Mathematics Workshop, August 31, 2006, 5-6:30 pm, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

"Origami Revisited: Connecting Your Students to Learning Mathematics" by Greg Oates, University of Auckland, New Zealand

As a secondary mathematics teacher, Greg Oates often used Origami as a diversionary activity for Friday afternoons, or various activities such as school open days, or science fairs. However, recent scientific and mathematical developments incorporating Origami have stimulated a growing international awareness of Origami, and suggest some justification for greater inclusion of Origami in the mathematics curriculum. The wider applications of Origami to the curriculum became apparent during the development of the Great Origami Maths and Science Show, a project funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand (RSNZ), with collaboration between Origami New Zealand and the Mathematics Department at The University of Auckland. The one-hour show is accompanied by a detailed resource aligned to the New Zealand mathematics curriculum, and is described in advertising to schools as the ultimate maths field trip, with an aim of turning people on to the realms of possibilities within the origami art-form. It examines some of the mathematical and scientific concepts contained in the extraordinary array of shapes and the folds involved.

This presentation looked at some of the features of the show, the speaker’s conversion to regarding Origami as a serious curricular activity, and provided examples of how Origami may be included in everyday curricular activities.

Download flyer Word document

Mathematics Colloquium, August 30, 2006, 2-3 pm, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

"The Great Origami Maths and Science Show - What’s up in Origami and Mathematics Down-under?" by Greg Oates, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Two years ago origami was regarded largely as a children’s recreational activity in the mathematics department at The University of Auckland. This status has changed remarkably as a result of two main influences. Firstly, access via the Internet to the materials and research of international origami experts such as Robert Lang and Tom Hull. Secondly and more recently, Jonathan Baxter has stimulated interest in this field through presentations to students and staff within the department, particularly those involved in the secondary mathematics teacher training programme, and topology research.

An exciting development of this growing awareness has been a project called the Great Origami Maths and Science Show. This project, funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand (RSNZ), is a collaboration between Origami New Zealand and the Mathematics Department at The University of Auckland. The one-hour show is accompanied by a detailed resource aligned to the New Zealand mathematics curriculum. The show, described in advertising to schools as the ‘ultimate maths field trip’, aims to turn people on the realms of possibilities within the origami art-form. It examines some of the mathematical and scientific concepts contained in the extraordinary array of shapes and the folds involved. Multiple presentations will be made during a national tour of seven major centres through July, August and early September of 2006, commencing with the Incredible Science Day at The University of Auckland.

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever project anywhere in the world to receive government funding on such a scale for origami and maths, science and education-related pursuits. This presentation will discuss the design and implementation of the project, with video excerpts from the show, and examples from the accompanying resource book. Details of the project, including feedback from educators and students, tips on how to start a similar project, places to look for funding, pit-falls, and possible improvements on the original concept will be shared.

Download Flyer Word document

Math Colloquium, August 30, 2006; University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

"Mathematics Tutoring in Auckland", by Greg Oates, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Mathematics courses at The University of Auckland have for many years used collaborative tutorials and peer-tutors in their teaching. This seminar, led by one of the supervisors of this tutorial programme, will describe and discuss some of the unique aspects of the programme; for example, the innovative Tutoring in Mathematics course that allows students to earn degree-status credits in mathematics while training them as peer-group tutors, and the recent extension of the collaborative small-class tutorials to cover all first and second-year undergraduate courses in the department. Evidence will be provided of the effectiveness of the tutorial programme, as gauged from a survey of students’ perceptions. Some of the tutors also subsequently enroll in the University’s Graduate Diploma in Teaching (Secondary). The effects of the tutoring course on tutors continuing to tutor at higher levels, and on their performances as novice teachers in the Diploma course, will be examined.

Download Flyer Word document

Workshop for Mathematics Teachers, April 8, 2006 8:30 AM - 11 AM, MPS School Support Center

"Exploring the Shape of Space" by Dr. Jeff Weeks

Dr. Weeks presented an interactive talk with Middle and High School Mathematics teachers challenging the idea of the universe as infinite. Through demonstration, Weeks shared activities from his book (The Shape of Space, Marcel Dekker, 1985; second ed. 2002), and curriculum unit (Exploring the Shape of Space, Key Curriculum Press, 2001). This included small group activities, paper-and-scissors constructions and computer games to introduce students in grades 5-10 to the mind-stretching possibility of a "multiconnected universe". Interactive 3D graphics let them explore many possible shapes for space. To conclude the workshop, the group examined how recent satellite data provides tantalizing clues to the true shape of our universe.

Download Flyer Word document

Workshop for Mathematics Teachers, May 20, 2006, 8:30 am - 4 pm, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

"Engaging Mathematics: Connecting Your Students to Learning Mathematics"

Guest Speakers:

  • Judy Paterson, University of Auckland, New Zealand;
  • Gabriella Pinter, UW-Milwaukee;
  • Harvey Keynes & Simon Morgan, University of Minnesota

Download Flyer Word Document

The number of participants at the May 20th workshops were as follows:
64 people attended at least one of the sessions (AM or PM)
37 people attended both sessions
7 attended only the AM session
20 attended only the PM session
44 attended the AM session
57 attended the PM session

Math Department Colloquium, May 22, 2006, 3 pm, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Dr. Judy Paterson from the Department of Mathematics at the University of Auckland visited UWM to present "Using Mathematics to open up windows in teachers’ minds: Encouraging teacher talk about learning and teaching" at a colloquium on May 22, 2006. Approximately 35 attendees from several local institutions of higher education were in attendance to hear and discuss their reactions to Dr. Paterson’s talk, which related her involvement in a longitudinal study that encourages interaction between mathematics teachers and the greater community through stimulation of mathematical input during professional development opportunities.

Download Flyer Word Document

Mathematics Colloquium, March 8, 2006, 4 pm, Marquette University

Marquette University’s Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science hosted Professor Guershon Harel, of the University of California-San Diego, for a colloquium talk on March 8, 2006. Professor Harel’s talk, “What is Mathematics? A Pedagogical Answer to a Philosophical Question”, enabled educators from several institutions of higher education to convene and benefit from Harel’s extensive research in the teaching and learning of mathematical proof. The colloquium coincided with two other events geared to mathematics educators and education majors at Marquette University.

Download Flyer Word Document

Math Colloquium, October 14, 2005, Marquette University

Over forty-five mathematicians and mathematics educators from twenty Milwaukee area high schools and institutions of higher education attended a Colloquium Event featuring Deborah Hughes-Hallett on Friday, October 14, 2005. The event, co-sponsored the MMP, was a one-day seminar held in the Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science at Marquette University. During the event, Dr. Hughes-Hallett taught a demonstration calculus lesson, led a question-and-answer session at a luncheon following the lesson, and conducted a colloquium on the topic of Calculus Teaching from a Reform Perspective.

View the Colloquium invitation PDF Document

IHE Network Conference, August 25-26, 2005, Carroll College

"Mathematical Knowledge Needed for Teaching in K-12 and Collegiate Mathematics and The Role of Definition in Mathematics Instruction" with guest speakers Hyman Bass and Deborah Ball, University of Michigan

This two-day conference had participants sharing in the conjectures and observations of the work of Deborah Ball and Hyman Bass. In their quest to describe the mathematical knowledge needed for teaching, Ball and Bass have observed that teaching requires extensive mathematical problem solving, which occurs constantly as teachers. Conference sessions dealt with topics such as the role and significance of definitions in mathematics instruction; calculus students' grasp of mathematical definition; mathematical knowledge needed for teaching, and the relevance of methematical knowledge for teaching to instructional quality and student learning. Sessions were highly interactive.

Download:

Flyer Word Document

Registration Word Document

Directions Word Document

Invitation Letter Word Document

Marden Lecture on Mathematics - "Math in the Movies", March 10, 2005

"Math in the Movies" presented by Dr. Tony DeRose, Senior Scientist and head of Research, Pixar Animation Studios

Film making is undergoing a digital revolution brought on by advances in areas such as computer technology, computational physics and computer graphics. This talk will provide a behind the scenes look at how fully digital films, such as Pixar's "Finding Nemo" and "The Incredibles", are made, with particular emphasis on the role that mathematics plays in the revolution.

Tony DeRose is currently a Senior Scientist and head of Research at Pixar Animation Studios. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1985. From 1985 to 1995 Dr. DeRose was a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. In 1998, he was a major contributor to the Oscar winning short film "Geri's game", and in 1999 he received the ACM SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics Achievement Award.

The Marden Lectures were established by Morris and Mirian Marden. Dr. Marden was a Distinguished Professor of Mathematics at UWM and was responsible for the inauguration of its graduate program, the first at the University. The Lectures are designed to bring distinguished mathematicians to UWM to speak to a general audience on a topic of mathematical interest. They have been given annually since 1989.

This event was held Thursday, March 10, 2005, 4:00 - 5:00 PM, Bolton Hall 150, at UWM. The lecture was sponsored by the Mirian and Morris Marden Fund and co-sponsored by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, the College of Letters and Science, and the College of Engineering.

View flyer Word Document

Math Colloquium, December 10, 2004

"The Mathematics Education of Teachers: One Example of an Evolving Partnership Between Mathematicians and Mathematics Educators" presented by Gail Burrill of Michigan State University.

Over forty mathematicians and mathematics educators from ten Milwaukee area institutions of higher education were in attendance at “The Mathematics Education of Teachers: One Example of an Evolving Partnership between Mathematicians and Mathematics Educators” presented by Gail Burrill of Michigan State University. This colloquium was the first in a series sponsored by the Department of Mathematical Sciences in conjunction with the School of Education through the Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership (MMP).

Gail Burrill, who is the Former Director of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board at the National Research Council, and Past President of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, spent the day at other MMP events before conversing animatedly about the capstone course for secondary mathematics majors that she co-developed and taught at Michigan State University. Successes, challenges, sample math problems and other resources used, co-teaching procedures, and surprise findings from teaching the course were all discussed to an interactive crowd of educators from local colleges and universities including UWM, Marquette, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Alverno College, Carroll College, and others.

UWM is in the process of developing a similar type of course through collaboration between faculty in the School of Education and those in the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

View the Powerpoint presentation.

IHE Kickoff Meeting, August 16 & 17, 2004

The kickoff for the Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) Network was held in conjunction with the annual NPRIME (Networking Project for the Improvement of Mathematics Education) conference August 16 and 17, 2004 at Alverno College . The conference topic, “What is the mathematical knowledge needed for teaching?” provided a springboard for discussion on topics related to the improvement of teacher education at the partnering institutions. Group sessions related experiences in developing teachers' mathematical knowledge and the process of preparing future mathematics teachers. The two-day interactive breakout sessions dealt with specific areas of mathematical preparation, such as geometry, probability and statistics, problem solving and proof, math for elementary teachers, and preparing secondary students' transition to college mathematics.

Download the Agenda. PDF Document

 


 

 

Center for Mathematics and Science Education Research

PO Box 413, Enderis 265 Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413

Tel: 414-229-6646
Fax: 414-229-4855

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership Logo and Link

About MMP link Partners link Calendar link Activities link Highlights link Resources link Contact Link Members login link to NSF page Supported by the National Science Foundation under Award EHR-0314898.