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Archive

Adult Access Working Group
Report and Recommendations

December, 1996

Committee Members
Swarnjit Arora, Academic Program Director, Social Science Research
Facility, Academic Program and Curriculum Committee Representative
James Blackburn, Dean, Social Welfare
Leonard Goldstein, Executive in Residence, Business Administration
Marshall Goodman, Dean, Letters and Science
Rene Gratz, Associate Professor, Allied Health Professions, University Committee Representative
Robert Kaleta, Information and Media Technologies
Kenneth Neusen, Interim Dean, Engineering and Applied Science
Laura Peracchio, Associate Professor, Business Administration
Kanti Prasad, Associate Dean, Business Administration
Terry Ruzicka, Program Manager, Office of Adult and Returning Student Services
Dan Shannon, Dean, Outreach and Continuing Education Extension
Thomas Walker, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science,
Graduate Faculty Council Representative
Mary Wierenga, Associate Dean, Graduate School
Gary Williams, Assistant Vice Chancellor
Ruth Williams, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Chair
Mary Ann Wisniewski, Assistant Dean, Outreach & Continuing Education Extension

SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS:

A. The market for courses and programs for adult learners should be regularly and continually assessed.
A1. Campus administration should commission a survey of the Milwaukee-area population to ascertain interest in educational programs and sites.
A2. Adult graduate and undergraduate students attending UWM credit and non-credit programs should be surveyed regularly to ascertain appropriate program offerings, delivery mechanisms, and services.
A3. UWM faculty should be surveyed periodically for program development ideas.
A4. The educational needs of employees of Milwaukee-area employers should be assessed regularly.
B. Additional programs and courses should be developed to address the educational needs of adult and returning students.
B1. Programs developed for the adult and returning student market should be consistent with the following criteria:
a) As much as possible, the campus should support the development of interdisciplinary programs around themes which appeal to a broad and sustainable market of prospective students.
b) Programs and courses developed particularly for adult students should have value equivalent to ongoing UWM degree programs, be subject to the same review as ongoing degree programs, and be designed and taught by the university's faculty and teaching staff.
c) Programs and courses developed for the adult and returning student market should not compete with ongoing degree programs.
d) Programs and courses should include admission criteria consistent with ongoing UWM programs.
B2. Reflecting its strength in graduate education, UWM should expand master's programs for adult and returning students.
B3. Additional certificate programs should be developed.
B4. Special consideration should be given to offering courses, certificate programs, and degrees which enable professional employees to maintain professional licensure.
B5. Programs to be delivered on-site at area businesses and agencies should be developed.
C. Alternative delivery mechanisms should be developed and utilized to expand access to ongoing and new academic programs.
C1. UWM's developing plan for distributed (distance) learning should include a primary focus on Southeastern Wisconsin to facilitate access of working adults to UWM educational programs and services.
C2. Satellite sites should be established in the metropolitan Milwaukee area beginning with the western area of Milwaukee County and the western suburbs.
C3. Courses originating at UWM should increasingly utilize distributed learning.
C4. UWM should collaborate with other SE Wisconsin institutions in offering distributed learning.
D. Utilization of the Kenwood campus should be increased by enhanced flexibility of programs and program schedules.
D1. Additional courses and programs should be available during evening hours on the Kenwood campus.
D2. Weekend degree and certificate programs should be offered on the Kenwood campus.
D3. Alternative class terms should be offered for adult learners.
E. A number of pilot programs should be in place beginning the Fall, 1997 semester.
E1. A weekend certificate (or degree) program offered on the Kenwood campus.
E2. A certificate program offered at a western Milwaukee metropolitan area site.
E3. Internet delivery combined with classroom meetings targeted to Milwaukee area residents.
E4. An on-site program for a major area employer.
E5. An alternative class term to accommodate adult learners.
F. Academic programs for adult and returning students should be intensely marketed under an identifiable name and a single and visible administrative unit should be assigned the responsibility for organizing and coordinating the development and marketing of these programs.
F1. A new position to coordinate and support adult and returning student programming should be established within the Office of the Provost.
F2. A marketing plan and budget should be established for promotion of academic programs for adult and returning students.
G. The university should provide financial incentives to faculty and departments for participating in the 1997-98 pilot programs and in ongoing program developments.
G1. Initial course and program development should be based as much as possible on current courses and faculty expertise.
G2. Extension (104) funds should be utilized to supplement unit resources supporting adult and returning student program development and delivery.
G3. Permanent budget recommendations should be made following the pilot experiences.
H. The recommendations of this report should be implemented immediately as resource allocations are being determined for the 1997-98 fiscal year.
H1. The recommendations as well as an implementation time lines should be transmitted to the academic deans along with a request for projects in each unit that are proposed for the campus pilots as well as for long-term development.
H2. Projects developed in response to these recommendations should be supported through mechanisms agreed upon between the provost and dean in planning the 1997-98 and subsequent budgets.

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE ADULT ACCESS WORKING GROUP

DECEMBER, 1996

CHARGE

The Adult Access Working Group, appointed by the Provost, was charged by Chancellor Schroeder to propose academic programs, delivery mechanisms, and off-campus sites to serve adult and returning students and to develop a visible focus for adult and returning students at UWM. In making this charge, the chancellor noted that UWM has a long and well known tradition of serving adult and returning students. In fact, it is only recently that local and other institutions are providing strong competition to UWM in this area. Serving the adult and returning population is important both as a critical part of enrollment revenues and as a vital part of UWM's institutional mission and strategic vision. The importance of the adult student population was underscored by the Marketing Plan developed last summer at the chancellor's request by the UWM Center for Business Competitiveness. The chancellor asked that the Adult Access Working Group focus on those recommendations from the Marketing Report that addressed the nature and delivery of academic programs.

BACKGROUND

The Working Group endorses the importance of the adult and returning student population to UWM's mission and future. Increasingly, individuals in the work force need to return to higher education to gain new skills and meet professional certificate and/or licensure requirements. Individuals who needed to leave college for a variety of personal and professional reasons are returning in increasing numbers to complete college. Corporations are seeking opportunities to support the professional development of their employees as the world of work changes and new skills are required. All colleges and universities are being called upon to meet the needs of adult and returning students, but urban universities have a particular responsibility and opportunity to serve the many individuals and organizations in metropolitan communities. A number of institutions across the country are attracted by metropolitan areas as sources of adult students in programs offered through a variety of distance education technologies. Local institutions have also launched courses and programs for this student market.

UWM programs currently attract and serve a large contingent of adult and returning students. Adult students (25 years of age and older) make up 34% of the Fall, 1996 undergraduate population and 84% of the graduate student population. A number of programs and courses are structured to enhance access for adult students. In Fall, 1995, UWM taught 48,642 student credit hours, which was 22% of the total credit hours conveyed, during evening hours. The School of Business Administration conveys 45% of its student credit hours in the evening, and offers an Executive MBA program on the weekends. The business degree programs are some of the 22 undergraduate and 22 graduate degrees which students can earn through attending only evening courses. A wide array of courses are offered off campus as well, with a number of sites utilized throughout the Milwaukee area and others throughout the state which serve as receive sites for distance transmission of courses.

Studies show that increasing adult student populations will continue to influence postsecondary education and training. Findings of a 1996 report published jointly by The Education Resources Institute and The Institute for Higher Education Policy underline the growing impact of this population of students:

Enrollment of students over 40 has risen by 235% between 1970 and 1993, the fastest and largest jump of any age group.
Most students over 40 attend classes on a part-time basis, and the typical 40-plus student is white, female, and married.
Traditional institutions will need to adapt to major new demands on their services, faculties and facilities, while employers are expected to play a far greater role in education and training.
Students over 40 are key factors driving innovative approaches to postsecondary education and training.
Despite their growing prominence in postsecondary education, the student aid system does not adequately address the needs of students over 40.

Census figures indicate that by the year 2020, 47% of the United States population will be over 40 years of age. By comparison, 38% of the 1990 US population was over 40. Serving the educational needs of a growing population of adult learners is a challenge UWM must meet to accomplish its mission and maintain its viability well into the new century. The recommendations which follow outline a number of ways by which UWM should actively address the issues of program development and delivery so as to better meet the evolving educational needs of adult learners in the metropolitan area.


RECOMMENDATIONS

A. The market for courses and programs for adult learners should be regularly and continually assessed.

A primary concern regarding the design of new program or course options and/or delivery options for adult and returning students is that we do not know with certainty what the needs and preferences are of potential adult students. Offering new programs, particularly at additional sites, requires the investment of faculty time and support resources, and there needs to be some assurance that such investments will be worthwhile.

A1. Campus administration should commission a survey of the Milwaukee-area population to ascertain interest in educational programs and sites.
The Working Group gave a great deal of consideration to methods of analyzing the potential market for programs, sites, and delivery options for adult and returning students. Consideration was given to surveying specified segments of the Milwaukee area population; for example, UWM alumni and students participating in appropriate UWM noncredit programs. However, the Working Group determined that it would be preferable to survey a stratified sample inclusive of individuals of varying educational backgrounds and residential areas around the Milwaukee metropolitan area. This survey will serve the dual purpose of informing survey recipients about UWM and collecting information about interest in a broad range of educational programs. The results of the general survey should then be used to further stratify the sample population by interest in professional areas.
A2. Adult graduate and undergraduate students attending UWM credit and non-credit programs should be surveyed regularly to ascertain appropriate program offerings, delivery mechanisms, and services.
Marketing professionals recommend that one of the best strategies for developing new markets is to seek systematic input and feedback from current clientele. UWM's already large population of adult and returning students offers an excellent population from which to collect information on program options and delivery mechanisms. Systematic surveys also offer opportunities to measure student satisfaction with current offerings.
A3. UWM faculty should be surveyed periodically for program development ideas.
As part of its review, the Working Group surveyed departments regarding programs currently in place as well as potential programs which might be developed for adult and returning students. The responses provided helpful information regarding programs in place, but contributed considerably more ideas for possible program development (Appendix A). Program suggestions were based primarily on UWM faculty awareness of professional needs, inquiries from prospective students, and knowledge of opportunities for program development in areas of faculty expertise within and across disciplines. Such faculty and staff surveys should be conducted every other year to spur program development ideas. UWM faculty and staff are vital key informants regarding program needs.
A4. The educational needs of employees of Milwaukee-area employers should be assessed regularly.
UWM needs to work more closely and directly with Milwaukee area businesses and other private and public sector organizations to determine the educational needs, both individually and collectively, of employees. Such needs might be met, as many currently are, by programs offered on the Kenwood campus, but programs delivered on site should also be considered. The Working Group recommends that, following consultation with selected area organizations, packages of courses and programs be marketed to area employers. This marketing should be initiated by the chancellor, with follow-up by appropriate program coordinators.

B. Additional programs and courses should be developed to address the educational needs of adult and returning students.

The Working Group concludes from its review that UWM should develop additional programs for the adult and returning student market. It is clear from the input received through the campus survey that faculty and staff across the university have a number of suggestions for programs which are likely to be in demand. The Working Group discussed a variety of program ideas and options. Opportunities for program development exist at all levels, from undergraduate to graduate education and in credit and non-credit programs. The recommendations below reflect the Working Group's assessments of those program opportunities which have the greatest potential marketability. The Working Group also discussed the need for increased flexibility in designing and implementing programs in response to the constraints many adult students face. For example, programs should not necessarily be offered in semester segments but instead might be offered in concentrated segments in shorter time periods. At the same time it supports such flexibility in structuring adult programs, the Working Group cautions against any developments which could compromise the quality of UWM's academic programs and supports policies which ensure rigor and quality synonymous with UWM's stature as a urban research university.

B1. Programs developed for the adult and returning student market should be consistent with the following criteria:
a) As much as possible, the campus should support the development of interdisciplinary programs around themes which appeal to a broad and sustainable market of prospective students.
b) Programs and courses developed particularly for adult students should have value equivalent to ongoing UWM degree programs, be subject to the same review as ongoing degree programs, and be designed and taught by the university's faculty and teaching staff.
c) Programs and courses developed for the adult and returning student market should not compete with ongoing degree programs.
d) Programs and courses should include admission criteria consistent with ongoing UWM programs.
B2. Reflecting its strength in graduate education, UWM should expand master's programs for adult and returning students.
As the largest and most comprehensive university in the area, UWM is able to offer courses andprograms to the adult student market that differ in breadth and depth from those offered by other institutions in Southeastern Wisconsin. A particular strength is the broad range of graduate education programs and the active involvement of the graduate faculty in research. UWM is already the institution to which most Milwaukee-area people turn to for graduate studies. As indicated by participants in activities promoting UWM's Evening Degree Programs, there is considerable interest on the part of prospective students in programs of graduate study. The Working Group suggests that faculty and academic administrators seek opportunities for the development of master's programs, and particularly interdisciplinary ones, in areas which already reflect faculty strength and in which courses are developed. Master's programs recommended for development by UWM faculty and staff (Appendix A) generally are of this nature.
B3. Additional certificate programs should be developed.
"Certificate" programs, in this case, refer to a broad range of programs which award certificates rather than degrees upon completion. (They should be distinguished from "certification" programs, which award professional certification upon completion.) UWM currently offers a variety of certificate programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Another type of "certificate" program available to students are "certificates of major" that are awarded to students with baccalaureate degrees who complete a second undergraduate major.
Developing additional certificate programs is recommended for the adult student market for a number of reasons. Because they entail fewer courses and credits, certificate programs offer greater opportunities for flexibility in scheduling than do full degree programs. The courses and training provided in certificate programs will, for a number of professional working adults, meet their educational and career needs in lieu of more comprehensive degree programs. For some students, the certificate program may provide an interim step to enrolling in a comprehensive degree program. Certificate programs also provide faculty the opportunity to pilot potential degree, especially master's, programs. Finally, because the planning and approval of certificate programs is done solely by the campus, they can be implemented on a much shorter time line than is the case for new proposed degree programs.
The Working Group considers the development of additional certificate programs to be an opportunity to enhance the programmatic array. Such development should not diminish but instead strengthen ongoing and new degree programs. The Working Group feels that the development of additional certificate programs for baccalaureate-trained students is a particularly appropriate niche for UWM. The Working Group also suggests that certificate programs (for example, "UWM Sampler Programs") may serve as good introductions to adult students considering, but cautious about, entering degree programs. Such samplers could also be designed to appeal to the interests of the retired population, following the model and the success of Elderhostel. As demonstrated by the list of suggestions from UWM faculty and staff (Appendix A), ideas abound for possible certificate programs which utilize courses currently in place and rely upon the strength of current faculty expertise and interest.
UWM undergraduate certificate programs are available to students enrolled as special students, and the credits earned may be applied to degree programs. Most graduate certificate programs are currently limited to degree candidates. Also, students are limited in their flexibility to apply graduate credits earned as non-degree candidates to degree programs. The Graduate Faculty Council is considering modifications to these restrictions which would enable enhanced accessibility of adult working students to certificate program options.
In its discussions of certificate programs, the Working Group focused primarily on the development of credit certificate programs, but realizes that non-credit certificate programs may be more suitable to certain student needs. The Group encourages consideration of possibilities whereby credit and non-credit options could be provided to students depending on their educational and professional needs.
B4. Special consideration should be given to offering courses, certificate programs, and degrees which enable professional employees to maintain professional licensure.
Most, if not all, professions represented by UWM degree programs now or will soon require continuing education for maintaining licensure. UWM should be planning programs and courses which will satisfy these professional requirements, particularly in those areas in which specific skills and course work have not yet been clearly defined. Excellent models exist in a number of areas on campus; for example, the School of Education offers numerous courses and programs for teachers to maintain certification. The opportunity exists for UWM to develop interdisciplinary continuing education programs (both credit and non-credit) which can be utilized by adult students in varying but complimentary professions. Such programs have the added advantage of relying upon and tapping into the up-to-date knowledge and expertise of faculty actively engaged in research.
B5. Programs to be delivered on-site at area businesses and agencies should be developed.
With its urban location and many partnerships and linkages with Milwaukee-area businesses and agencies, UWM is in a strong position to offer courses and academic programs that are developed to meet the specific needs of area employers when those needs fall generally within the scope of UWM's overall academic program array. Our experience is quite limited to date in offering programs on site that have been developed in partnership with the host agency. The Working Group feels strongly that this is an area which UWM must develop and suggests that a limited number of pilot programs be designed which can be marketed to area businesses and agencies. The Working Group has suggested that the chancellor make the initial marketing connections to appropriate agencies and organizations - a recommendation the chancellor has enthusiastically endorsed. The university must also take steps to facilitate requests and ideas from area organizations for educational programs on site and to respond in a timely and increasingly flexible manner to such proposals.

C. Alternative delivery mechanisms should be developed and utilized to expand access to ongoing and new academic programs.

UWM needs to consider a broad array of delivery options to meet the needs of a variety of prospective adult students. All options - whether distance delivery, satellite sites, evening and weekend programming, or concentrated course sessions - are geared toward offering academic programs at times and places which enable busy, working adults to participate without compromising their job or family responsibilities.

C1. UWM's developing plan for distributed (distance) learning should include a primary focus on Southeastern Wisconsin to facilitate access of working adults to UWM educational programs and services.
As part of the implementation of its strategic plan, UWM will develop a technology plan during this academic year that will include a plan for distributed (distance) learning. The Working Group suggests that a primary, though not exclusive, purpose of that plan be to increase access of individuals across Southeastern Wisconsin to UWM's array of credit and non-credit programs. We suggest this focus on Southeastern Wisconsin because this area is currently the predominant source of UWM undergraduate and graduate students. While developing technologies will increasingly provide area students with access to academic programs originating at institutions across the world, UWM has the unique ability to enhance access through distributed learning while continuing to provide the personal classroom contacts that are so missed by participants in distance learning. Our opportunity to combine distributed with classroom learning offers a unique and competitive advantage in the Milwaukee area at the same time enabling UWM to focus on its strategic initiative to "reinforce the university's commitment to enhancing the quality of life and economic base of the Milwaukee metropolitan area and the State of Wisconsin."
C2. Satellite sites should be established in the metropolitan Milwaukee area beginning with the western area of Milwaukee County and the western suburbs.
An important factor in adult student selection of academic programs and institutions is the proximity of the learning site to home (and less so to place of employment). While UWM enrolls students from across the larger metropolitan area, the necessity of commuting to the east side and the difficulties of parking serve to inconvenience currently enrolled students and to deter the enrollment of prospective students. A number of students currently take advantage of the extensive number of UWM courses that are offered at a variety of sites across the metropolitan area. Educational institutions across the country, as well as those in Wisconsin, are establishing satellite sites for the convenience of adult students. Such sites support a number of courses, programs and services that allow students to complete, if not an entire program, at least a substantial portion of courses at the satellite site. As noted above, the Working Group feels that a community survey and demographic analysis would provide important information to help guide the development of adult programs and the locations of satellite sites. However, the Working Group recommends that the campus begin satellite site development in the western metropolitan area. This area is recommended for a number of reasons. First, the western suburbs are one of the fastest growing areas of the state in population and in business development. Second, UWM already has a strong presence in this area demonstrated by its partnerships with agencies and organizations and the substantial proportion of UWM students from that area. Third, a number of articulation programs and cooperative arrangements are in place with postsecondary institutions in the western metropolitan area (Medical College of Wisconsin, UW Centers-Waukesha County and Washington County, and Waukesha County Technical College). Fourth, the impending reconstruction of I94 provides an opportunity to facilitate access to UWM programs and services in the western metropolitan area for residents who are already UWM students as well as for new populations of adult students in the area.
C3. Courses originating at UWM should increasingly utilize distributed learning.
As described above, UWM has a unique opportunity to expand access and enhance convenience of an adult student market by combining distributed learning with classroom learning. Distributed learning reduces the necessity of commuting and increases a student's time management flexibility (and responsibility). By incorporating more distributed learning into the curriculum, faculty enhance both the flexibility for enrolled adult students and the attraction of UWM program flexibility and convenience to prospective adult students.
Distributed learning will also facilitate the development of satellite sites and on-site delivery at area businesses and agencies. Facilities for distributed learning should be taken into account in selecting satellite campus sites and business sites.
C4. UWM should collaborate with other SE Wisconsin institutions in offering distributed learning.
The Working Group suggests that the UWM campus explore the development of consortia with other Milwaukee and Southeastern Wisconsin colleges and universities to share in the expensive costs of distance learning technologies. Such consortia might also provide opportunities to offer certificate programs utilizing expertise of faculty across the consortium. By building consortia, UWM and other Milwaukee-area institutions would save resources and be better able both to serve the educational needs of Milwaukee's citizens and to compete with numerous other institutions coming into the Milwaukee area via distance technologies.

D. Utilization of the Kenwood campus should be increased by enhanced flexibility of programs and program schedules.

While the Working Group strongly supports the development of satellite sites to increase enrollments of adult and returning students, it also strongly recommends that the Kenwood campus be more effectively utilized as well. The university can best meet the needs of a diverse market of adult students by being flexible in responding to the needs of this population. While the recommendations below pertain to utilization of the campus in evenings and on weekends, it is important to note that, according to information obtained from the College Board, almost as many adult students enroll in daytime as in evening classes. This pattern is borne out by the UWM Marketing Study, which determined that 1/3 of UWM adult students consider themselves day students, 1/3 consider themselves night students, and 1/3 consider themselves day and night students. What may differ for an adult student from a "traditional-age" student is the need to travel to and from the site of the class within the confines of other responsibilities. In this regard, any improvements the campus can make in providing campus parking for students benefits the adult "nontraditional" student as much or more than the student who spends blocks of time if not whole days on campus.

D1. Additional courses and programs should be available during evening hours on the Kenwood campus.
UWM has made an important effort recently to increase and market the number of degrees students can earn through evening study alone. Through these efforts, students in most undergraduate degree programs are now able to complete all general education requirements with evening courses. It is now time to review other programs and degrees to further enhance and strengthen the evening degree program. It is also necessary to ensure that support services are available to students attending classes only in the evening. To this end, the Working Group endorses the Provost's recommendation that the campus present a wider range of services and faculty and staff availability to evening students and that, at a minimum, needed services from staff and faculty should be accessible to evening students until 6:00 PM on Mondays and Tuesdays.
D2. Weekend degree and certificate programs should be offered on the Kenwood campus.
While Saturday classes are held on the Kenwood campus, currently the only UWM degree program packaged for weekend delivery is the Executive MBA program. Weekend program delivery is appealing because many of the problems encountered during the week days (parking, crowded computer laboratories, classroom limitations) can be avoided. A number of area institutions have very effectively fashioned weekend programs for adult students, and UWM can model programs based on lessons learned by colleges and universities in the area and across the country.
D3. Alternative class terms should be offered for adult learners.
The typical semester course schedule works well for students carrying a full credit load and for whom college is a primary or even exclusive undertaking. Working adults, however, often prefer condensed courses which do not stretch over a sixteen week period. Weekend programming provides one mechanism for condensing programs for adult student schedules, but other alternatives include condensed terms, much like current summer school sessions. Such condensed sessions could be offered at any time of the year as appropriate to the discipline and the professional area it serves. The Working Group also recommends that the campus consider utilizing the period between semesters to offer condensed "Winterim" sessions. In making these recommendations, the Working Group acknowledges that all subjects do not lend themselves to condensed courses.

E. A number of pilot programs should be in place beginning the Fall, 1997 semester.

The Working Group strongly recommends that a number of pilot programs and delivery mechanisms be planned immediately for implementation next fall. While the group suggests that the university needs to assess its market for programs and services, it also feels that it is most important for UWM to take bold and visible steps to build its adult and returning student market. The Working Group recommends that the following pilot projects be in place next fall:

E1. A weekend certificate (or degree) program offered on the Kenwood campus.
E2. A certificate program offered at a western Milwaukee metropolitan area site.
E3. Internet delivery combined with classroom meetings targeted to Milwaukee area residents.
E4. An on-site program for a major area employer.
E5. An alternative class term to accommodate adult learners.

F. Academic programs for adult and returning students should be intensely marketed under an identifiable name and a single and visible administrative unit should be assigned the responsibility for organizing and coordinating the development and marketing of these programs.

Perhaps UWM's greatest deficiency in serving and marketing to adult and returning students is the absence of a clearly identifiable entity which is responsible for these efforts and which provides a visible contact point for those outside or within the university community to seek information or suggest program development. A number of universities have established special divisions (e.g. Professional Studies) to serve these purposes. The Working Group considered but quickly rejected taking such an action at UWM. Adult and returning students are already an integral part of the "fabric" of most academic programs. Further, the Working Group feels that enhanced efforts in programming and delivery for the adult student market must remain within the purview of the academic units and not be removed and isolated into a separate division. Nevertheless, the Working Group strongly recommends that the responsibility for organizing and supporting adult student programming within and between the academic units be clearly designated and assigned.

F1. A new position to coordinate and support adult and returning student programming should be established within the Office of the Provost.
The Working Group considered a number of options for assigning oversight responsibilities for adult and returning student programming. These included the Division of Outreach and Continuing Education Extension (DOCEx), the Graduate School, and the newly established Office of Adult and Returning Student Services (OARSS) in the Department of Enrollment Services. Following considerable discussion, the Working Group concluded that coordination from Academic Affairs could ensure the necessary academic linkages and credibility as well as necessary resource support for these efforts to be successful. The designated coordinator would work with the academic leadership and program directors in schools and colleges, DOCEx, and OARSS to develop program options, satellite sites, and other delivery mechanisms developed for the adult student market.
F2. A marketing plan and budget should be established for promotion of academic programs for adult and returning students.
UWM needs to give considerably greater attention to its marketing of adult and returning students. The Working Group recommends that the Office of Adult and Returning Student Services be given the responsibility and resources to employ, in coordination with the Graduate School, DOCEx, and the appropriate academic units, a professional marketing firm to develop a comprehensive marketing plan for the university's wide range of programs for adult and returning students. The Working Group further suggests that a budget recommended by the marketing firm be set aside for ongoing advertising that is planned well in advance. The Working Group offers as an example of effective and comprehensive marketing an advertisement of DePaul University in the November 17, 1996 edition of the Chicago Tribune (Appendix B).
In addition, the Working Group recommends that major promotional events, such as the Showcase for Learning, expand their present focus to attract, in addition to traditional freshmen, adult and returning students to UWM's broad array of graduate and undergraduate programs.

G. The university should provide financial incentives to faculty and departments for participating in the 1997-98 pilot programs and in ongoing program developments.

The recommendations of the Working Group - providing additional programs; increasing access via distributed learning, satellite sites, and evening and weekend programs; and enhancing coordination and marketing - require financial investments. Ultimately, these efforts will pay for themselves by enhancing enrollments (and thus tuition revenues). In the interim, however, careful planning and financial incentives need to be provided to encourage academic units to implement the recommendations.

G1. Initial course and program development should be based as much as possible on current courses and faculty expertise.
As noted earlier, a number of opportunities exist for combining courses already offered in new certificate programs for the adult student market. Programs already in place - certificate and degree - can be more effectively marketed to attract the adult student population.
G2. Extension (104) funds should be utilized to supplement unit resources supporting adult and returning student program development and delivery.
Extension (104) funds allow for added flexibility over 101 funds to experiment with program offerings. While credits earned under extension funding do not count toward the campus tuition revenue, utilizing this funding mechanism makes it possible for units to continue with current offerings while earning revenue to support additional efforts targeted to new adult and returning students.
G3. Permanent budget recommendations should be made following the pilot experiences.
Ultimately, credit programs serving adult and returning students should be fully funded through the 101 general program revenue. The pilot projects recommended in this report will provide experiences which will inform resource planning to continue and expand these program developments.

H. The recommendations of this report should be implemented immediately as resource allocations are being determined for the 1997-98 fiscal year.

The Working Group has outlined a number of steps for campus units to take to broaden UWM's adult student market. It has not made specific recommendations for programs and courses to be developed because such decisions for program development must take place within the academic units themselves. However, the key to UWM's success in further developing its adult student programs is the addition, without delay, of specific programs and sites to these recommendations. To this purpose, the Working Group recommends the following administrative steps:

H1. The recommendations as well as an implementation time lines should be transmitted to the academic deans along with a request for projects in each unit that are proposed for the campus pilots as well as for long-term development.
H2. Projects developed in response to these recommendations should be supported through mechanisms agreed upon between the provost and dean in planning the 1997-98 and subsequent budgets.


APPENDIX A

The Adult Access Working Group surveyed academic departments regarding programs in place as well as ideas for development of programs for the adult and returning students market. The following list summarizes the suggestions the Working Group received for new program development. These suggestions have been categorized by discipline areas for reporting purposes only - the categories do not reflect the sources of these recommendations nor do these listings signify endorsement by the Adult Access Working Group.


CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

HEALTH AND SERVICE DISCIPLINES

Addiction Prevention and Treatment
Advanced Practice Nursing (post masters)
Bioethics (coord. with MCW)
Biotechnology
Child and Youth Care
Clinical Lab Sciences for Nurses
Family Nurse Practitioner
Gerontology
Health Care Administration
Human Service Administration (postmasters)
Long-term Care
Managed Care
Mental Health Clinical Nurse Practitioner
Nutrition
Speech-Language Pathology Assistant
Program
Women's Health Nurse Practitioner

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Advanced Inventory Management
Advanced Purchasing Management
Business French
Business Spanish

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Distributed Computing
Information Technology
Object Oriented Programming
WWW Site Development and Administration

PERSONNEL AND HUMAN RELATIONS MANAGEMENT

Mediation
Multicultural Affairs and Diversity
Public Administration
Urban Community Leadership

EDUCATION

College Student Personnel
Higher Ed. Administration
Home Schooling
Instructional Technology and Design

ARTS AND MUSIC

Intermedia Arts
Jazz
Music and Business
Popular Music

OTHER

Aquatic Ecology
Ethics
Environmental Studies
Environmentally Sensitive Design
Forensic Science
International Studies
Microbiology
Public Policy
Professional licensure renewal programs
Professional/Technical Writing


MASTER'S PROGRAMS

Addiction Prevention and Treatment
Applied Economics
Aquatic Ecology
Biotechnology
College Student Personnel
"Customized" Masters (Education)
Dance (mfa)
Ethics
Forensic Science
Gerontology
Higher Ed. Administration
International Studies
Liberal Studies or Liberal Arts and Sciences
Master's of Arts in Teaching (general)
Master's of Arts in Teaching (Dance)
Professional licensure renewal programs
Professional/technical Writing
Public Policy