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Archive

Resource Planning Document
Division of Academic Affairs
1999-2000


Prepared by the
Office of the Provost
and Vice Chancellor



Table of Contents

Introduction

A. Progress In Meeting the Goals of the Strategic Plan

  1. Strengthening and integrating the university's main purpose - the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge
  2. Advance UWM's stature as a center of scholarly excellence and improve its position in the Carnegie ranking of Research II universities
  3. Responding to conclusions and recommendations of program reviews and the program array review process
  4. Enriching the learning experience of UWM students
  5. Expanding UWM's urban mission and reinforce the university's commitment to enhancing the quality of life and economic base of the Milwaukee metropolitan area and the State of Wisconsin
  6. Stabilizing enrollments and resources
  7. Ensuring that resource distribution and recruitment plans are consonant with strategic objectives and the maintenance of quality programs and services. Raising private funds to augment state funding
  8. Expanding technology. Employ appropriate information and communication technology to improve the academic, student service and administrative operations of the campus
  9. Enhancing the campus environment: Improving the support systems and physical facilities that make the campus environment conducive to learning and working
  10. Achieving the goals of the Milwaukee Initiative/Commitment
  11. Meeting equal opportunity expectations for faculty, staff and students

B. 1999-00 Budget Allocations

  1. Allocations made at the onset of the budget planning process
  2. Allocations to implement the recommendations from the Program Array Review (PAR)
  3. Allocations of undergraduate initiative funds
  4. Allocations of Campus Opportunity Funds
  5. Allocations of the Educational Technology Fee
  6. Allocations for the Milwaukee Idea

C. Planning for UWM's Future





INTRODUCTION

The past year has been one of change, planning for new directions and initiatives and consolidation of past gains for UWM. Most noteworthy, of course, was the change in campus leadership when the sixth chancellor of UWM, Dr. Nancy L. Zimpher, arrived to begin her duties on August 1, 1998.

Following Dr. Zimpher's arrival, the campus embarked on an ambitious and broadly inclusive planning initiative which came to be known as the Milwaukee Idea. Planning for the Milwaukee Idea involved more than 200 students, faculty, staff and community members and led to the identification of 10 First Ideas that have been given to the same number of Action Teams for development of implementation plans. The Action Teams and their Advisory Councils are due to report their work in August, 1999, for review and decisions about investment in any or all of these First Ideas.

Each of the First Ideas developed around themes of partnership, inclusion, diversity and engagement and was built upon existing campus strengths and identified community interest and need. Ultimately, the Milwaukee Idea can be seen as an articulation of the Strategic Plan for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee as it seeks to:

  • integrate our traditional teaching, research and outreach missions

  • provide a mechanism for moving the university forward on its quest to more solidly establish itself as a premier urban research university

  • expand our investment in and partnership with our urbancommunity

  • stabilize our resources

  • build a stronger campus community

All are priorities of the UWM Strategic Plan.

The remarkable progress and wide acceptance of the Milwaukee Idea prompted questions about our ability to make necessary investments in these new and focused initiatives and to continue our investments in all of the other important things the university must do. In April of 1999, a retreat of about 50 faculty, staff and students spent a day and a half developing a set of "investment priorities" and outlining sources of income for these priorities. This retreat, called Planning for the Future of UWM, was attended by all members of the Academic Planning and Budget Committee, the Chancellor's Cabinet, the Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee, the Academic Dean's Council and members of the Provost's staff.

The report of that retreat called for targeted investment in seven crucial areas over the coming five years. These are:

  • research and research infrastructure

  • the Milwaukee Idea

  • planned enrollment growth

  • The Milwaukee Commitment for increased diversity

  • a new student information system for the campus

  • ?targeted compensation adjustments

  • contingency needs.

During the summer, the Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee is meeting to hear reports on how we can plan for and accomplish these investments and to develop a much more detailed revenue and investment plan.

The retreat also targeted several important sources of revenue to fund these investments. These include:

  • tuition from expanding enrollments

  • growing extramural funding levels

  • a major capital campaign

  • a biennial budget request for additional state funding in 2001-2003 and beyond

  • the use of excess reserves in some auxiliary accounts

Again, the CBAC is working to develop firmer estimates of the amounts that might be available to the campus in each of these categories.

It is very important to remember that our ability to make commitments of considerable magnitude for this campus at this time rests substantially upon our success in the past 4-5 years in bringing our campus enrollments back to targeted levels in Fall 1998 for the first time since 1992. We project increasing enrollments in the years ahead, based upon the larger freshman classes the past four years and expanding service to non-traditional students. UW System policy automatically returns 75% of excess tuition derived from enrollments above our target levels and we are seeking access to 100% of these tuition revenues. These returned excess tuition revenues will be an important investment source for the campus over the next five years.

Our enrollment successes of the past few years come as we begin the preparation for the UWM part of a systemwide enrollment plan entitled EM21. This enrollment plan will be more flexible than systemwide enrollment plans of the last twelve years and promises to enable UWM to take advantage of its strengths: a reputation for high quality, a strong tradition of access, a large base of potential students in our immediate area, a diverse and broad program array, and an excellent physical plant to name just a few. All of those governance groups which have been involved in the budget planning described above will be closely consulted as we continue to develop the UWM plan for EM21.

Coupled with our success in bringing enrollments to and above expected levels, the campus must also be more successful in generating increased external funding. UWM became a Research II university several years ago based upon its annual number of Ph.D. recipients and the level of federal funding coming to the campus. We are, though, second from the bottom in federal funding on the most recent list of Research II universities. We have the potential to do much better. Graduate Dean and Associate Provost for Research Rayburn, working with the Research Policy Committee, is developing a Research Plan that will propose strategies to move the campus forward in its quest to increase substantially its extramural funding levels. If we are to accomplish this, one of the direct benefits of investment in the Milwaukee Idea must be a markedly increased level of extramural support for our research, instruction and outreach efforts.

The Milwaukee Idea, integrated with our research, enrollment and diversity plans, will form the basis for a campus specific request for funding in the next state biennial budget (2001-2003). The partnership of the State of Wisconsin will be a critical element of our plans to build our external support, expand our enrollment base and access, and become even more engaged in the life of metropolitan Milwaukee. We will work to develop this budget request over the next several months.

Finally, a key element of our engagement over the next few years will be the development of a successful capital campaign for the campus. The Milwaukee Idea and our other planning have laid very important groundwork for such a campaign. A new assistant chancellor has been hired for the areas of development and alumni relations and he will be key to plans for a successful campaign.

Several other leadership positions will change hands in the next year or two. I have announced that I will retire next June 30 and the recruitment for a new Provost and Vice Chancellor has begun with the appointment of a search and screen committee and advertising for the position. We also have in place a search and screen committee for Dean of the School of Allied Health Professions and will interview finalists this fall semester. We are in the process of appointing a search and screen committee to identify candidates for Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science. That recruitment should be completed next spring. We have recently experienced the resignations of the deans of the School of the Arts and the School of Nursing. Interim deans have been appointed and discussions about recruitment strategies will begin this fall semester.

In short order, then, we will replace the campus provost and 1/3 of the campus deans. Of the eight continuing deans, only three have been at UWM more than four years. This cadre of new leadership will work with Chancellor Zimpher and the faculty, staff and students to carry UWM into the 21st century amidst a spirit of optimism that surpasses anything I have experienced in my 30 years here. This optimism and the willingness of so many to work so hard toward common goals leads to my conviction that the future for UWM is indeed bright.


A. PROGRESS IN MEETING THE GOALS OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN

As part of the annual planning process, each dean and director ranked his/her unit's progress to date in accomplishing implementation of the UWM Strategic Plan. These self-reported rankings are listed below; the full text of each unit's planning document is available on the Academic Affairs web site. The Provost's rankings for UWM are based not on the average of the unit rankings but rather on his own view of the overall progress of the campus as a whole.

Scale:
1. Not applicable
2. Minimal achievement compared to unit goal

3. Moderate achievement compared to unit goal
4. Substantial achievement compared to unit goal
5. Extensive achievement compared to unit goal

1. Strengthening and integrating the university's main purpose - the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge.

A. Development, promotion and reward policies are in place and have been reviewed in the past two years for consistency with the goals of the strategic plan.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
CurrentProgress 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3

With the adoption of the campus strategic plan, a key implementation step has been the review and modification of development, promotion and reward policies. Several units have addressed this effectively. We still need to engage campus-wide governance and administrative bodies in such a review. Its importance grows as we pursue the implementation of the Milwaukee Idea and its focus on partnerships and inter-unit cooperation.

B. Unit and/or institutional barriers to cross-unit and integrated collaboration in teaching, research, and service have been reduced.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 5 4 3 5 3 5 3 3 3



DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 3 3 4 5 3

As the unit planning documents illustrate, there are several examples of programs which have been or are being developed collaboratively between units. At the same time, much of the campus conversation over the past year has reflected general frustrations with the difficulty of collaboration.

C. Students are engaged in the scholarship of creation of knowledge.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DOCE DSAD UWM
Current Progress 4 4 5 3 4 5 5 3 4 5 3 3 4


2. Advance UWM's stature as a center of scholarly excellence and improve its position in the Carnegie ranking of Research II universities.

A. Extramural support is increasing


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DOCE DSAD UWM
Current Progress 2 4 2 3 4 4 2 3 4 4 4 3 2

Extramural support across all categories of gifts, grants, and contracts is increasing. The low UWM ranking reflects our decrease as an institution in federal research expenditures. These are the expenditures that are taken into account by the Carnegie Commission in classifying research institutions. UWM is one of only 125 US institutions designated as a research institution by the Carnegie Commission. In the category of Research II institutions, UWM ranks 36 of 37. Our greatest concerns rest with our record of growth in federal expenditures. From 1987-88 through 1991-92, we experienced a 14.2% annual growth compared with a 9.8% average annual increase across all Research II universities. But in the interval from 1991-92 through 1996-97, our average annual increase fell to 1.3% while the average annual increase across Research II universities was 6.2%.

Indicator = average/97-98; awards include grants issued over multiple years


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
# PROPOSALS/FTE FACULTY AND RESEARCH STAFF 0.6 1.1 0.2 1.4 0.4 0.04 0.0 0.7 0.7 0.5 0.5
$ (000) PROPOSED/FTE FACULTY AND RESEARCH STAFF 168.5 32.7 17.2 472.8 71.8 1.9 0.2 104.1 108.1 98.1 89.0
# AWARDS/ FTE FACULTY AND RESEARCH STAFF 0.6 1.4 0.6 1.6 0.6 1.4 0.7 0.7 1.4 1.4 0.9
$ (000) AWARDS/ FTE FACULTY AND RESEARCH STAFF 12.8 19.7 19.8 44.7 22.8 14.5 5.1 25.4 42.6 91.7 24.8

Indicators = 97-98


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
RESEARCH EXPENDITURES ($ 000) 242 451 760 2,864 5,804 1 0 467 698 660 18,943
EXTRAMURAL FUNDS EXPENDED/STATE ACTIVITY 4 FUNDS ($ 000) NA 4.4 2.4 2.5 3.6 NA NA 1.8 2.4 NA 1.9
EXTRAMURAL FUNDS EXPENDED/FACULTY FTE 8,003 13,911 11,952 37,842 15,080 81 0 4,789 17,982 28,286 17,872

In the data reported below, each school/college reported on the number of faculty submitting one or more extramural proposals and the number of faculty receiving one or more awards in 1997-98. Combining these self-reports yields an overall campus participation rate of 36% faculty submitting proposals and 26% receiving awards in 1997-98. Of the faculty active in research with federal extramural funding, 32 faculty/staff have extramural funding averaging more than $100,000/year (FY 93-98).


DOCE SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
A
# FACULTY SUBMITTING ONE OR MORE PROPOSALS IN 1997-98



7



13


17


11


43.4


78


6


25


22


18


9
B
# FACULTY IN 1997-98


7


34.3


30.0


49.4


53.7


324.9


7


68.0


66.3


27.5


22.5
A/B
FACULTY PARTICIPATION RATE


1.0


0.38


0.56


0.22


0.81


0.24


0.86


0.37


0.33


0.65


0.40





DOCE


SAHP


SARUP


SBA


CEAS


L&S


SLIS


SOA


SOE


SON


SW
A
# FACULTY RECEIVING ONE OR MORE AWARD IN 1997-98


7


12


17


7


36.4


31


2


25


13


19


8
B
# FACULTY IN 1997-98


7


34.3


30.0


49.4


53.7


324.9


7


68


66.3


27.5


22.5
A/B
FACULTY PARTICIPATION RATE


1.0


0.35


0.56


0.14


0.65


0.09


0.30


0.37


0.20


0.69


0.35

B. The quantity and quality of scholarly productivity is increasing


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DOCE UWM
Current Progress 3 4 4 NA 4 4 5 3 3 5 4 3

The Program Array Review required programs to report productivity for the department as a ratio per faculty member (and research academic staff) in the following categories: Monographs, Chapters, Articles, Creative Expression, Presentations, Professional Service, Community Service, and University Service. This was the first time that such information was collected in a common format across all academic programs. There clearly are limitations to the value of this information; for example, data are self-reported, and the quality of scholarly work is not taken into account. However, these reports do provide benchmarks for internal assessment by programs and units of the collective work of faculty and research academic staff. As part of the 1999-00 planning process, each department was asked to update this information for the 1997-98 year. Reports included the categories Professional Service and Community Service, but these categories are not included in the summary table below. While these activities are crucial to the strategic goals of the campus, there is no common definition nor understanding of what constitutes a reportable unit; thus comparisons are not as meaningful as for Articles or Chapters, which are better defined. In the following table, the '97-98 data are compared with the '94-97 ratios reported in the Program Array Review. A one-year window is not adequate to compare against the preferred 3-year average; such a comparison will be possible after two more years of data are collected.

The provost's assessment of moderate progress is based on these quantified reports; it may very well be the case that the quality of scholarly productivity warrants a higher assessment.

SCHOLARLY PRODUCTIVITY REPORTS *





Allied Health Professions
Monographs Chapters Articles Presentations
94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98
Occupational Therapy 0.40 1.35 0.80 0.81 5.50 1.62 18.14 3.51
Human Kinetics 0.05 0.24 0.52 1.20 0.90 1.56 2.90 3.25
Health Care Administration 0.04 0.55 0.00 0.00 8.40 0.67 10.40 0.17
Health Information Admin. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.35 0.50 2.10 3.50 2.40
Clinical Laboratory Sciences 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.80 2.38 4.20 7.38









Architecture & Urban Planning







Architecture 0.16 0.16 1.77 0.95 0.30 0.65 2.88 2.94
Urban Planning 0.40 0.29 0.46 0.29 1.86 1.49 3.06 5.30









Business Administration 0.02 0.08 0.07 0.12 1.00 1.18 0.64 1.56









Education







Administrative Leadership 0.19 0.13 0.41 0.76 2.52 1.63 3.37 3.67
Curriculum & Instruction 0.63 0.55 0.65 0.65 2.15 2.43 7.60 8.12
Educ. Policy & Community Studies 0.70 0.0 0.00 0.12 5.0 5.1 3.20 2.30
Educational Psychology 0.0 0.4 0.22 0.50 3.0 2.2 4.1 3.6
Exceptional Education 0.6 0.79 0.42 1.46 0.83 2.58 8.5 11.57









Engineering & Applied Science







Civil Engineering 0.62 0.08 0.40 0.42 4.47 2.58 7.78 5.00
Computer Science 0.03 0.18 0.00 0.18 3.44 5.80 3.67 5.36
Electrical Engineering 0.03 0.0 0.17 0.82 0.0 4.08 3.03 3.27
Industrial Engineering 0.28 0.0 0.00 0.28 3.56 0.60 4.95 4.00
Materials Engineering 0.80 0.0 0.80 0.28 11.00 5.97 7.90 3.19
Mechanical Engineering 0.37 0.21 0.60 0.57 10.30 13.14 7.20 9.14




Letters & Science
Monographs Chapters Articles Presentations
94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98
Natural Sciences 0.10 0.16 0.37 0.31 2.41 1.97 3.94 3.87
Humanities & Communication 0.24 0.28 0.48 0.65 1.12 1.38 1.41 3.06
Social Sciences 0.36 0.36 0.50 0.60 1.42 1.49 2.14 3.04









Library & Information Science 0.90 0.14 0.50 0.57 3.00 5.43 3.50 3.71









Nursing 0.02 0.0 0.94 0.67 1.25 1.50 4.12 3.87









Social Welfare







Criminal Justice 0.6 0.6 0.68 0.6 1.6 3.28 2.2 3.28
Social Work 0.14 0.53 0.47 1.06 2.3 2.32 4.83 3.11








School of the Arts
Creative Expression Chapters Articles Presentations
94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98 94-97 97-98
Art 2.30 5.14

0.00 0.54 0.00 0.86
Dance 6.40 7.30



0.00 3.10
Film 0.70 2.27

0.00 0.91 5.10 13.33
Music 0.30 18.72 0.06 0.29 0.08 0.68 0.30 2.12
Theatre 3.50 3.24



2.10 2.31

* Ratios reported are numbers of items produced annually by department, as reported by the department, divided by the number of faculty and research academic staff.

1994-97 ratio as reported by departments in the program array review conducted during 1997-98.

1997-98 numerator as reported by departments in the 1999-2000 planning process; denominator includes faculty in all funds and activities plus academic staff in all funds but only activity 4 (research).

Departmental data are available for the College of Letters and Science from the Office of the Letters & Science Dean or from the Office of the Provost.

3. Responding to conclusions and recommendations of program reviews and the program array review process.

A. Program changes and intra-unit resource allocations are planned and/or are underway to implement the Program Array Review (PAR) and other program changes resulting from program reviews completed within the last two years.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DSAD GML Grad School UWM
Current Progress 3 3 5 NA 4 3 3 3 3 5 3 1 5 4

History of the Program Array Review: The campus strategic plan, adopted in June 1996, called for UWM to "adjust its academic program array to maintain high quality and meet the needs of students." On the request of campus administration, the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee designed a program array review process that was approved May 6, 1997 by the faculty senate as Faculty Document 2084. The purpose of the Program Array Review (PAR) was to assess program quality and need for attention, and to recommend areas of investment to increase the overall program quality at UWM. The provost has planned two major base allocations of campus funds: $250,000 in 1999-00 and $250,000 in 2000-01. The schools/colleges are expected to match these investments, bringing the total investment to $1.0M. During the 1997-98 academic year, each program was provided quantitative measures and asked to prepare additional quantitative descriptions of its scholarly productivity as well as a narrative report describing its strengths and value to the campus strategic goals. A faculty committee comprised of the members of the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee, the Graduate Faculty Council's Committee on Reviews, and the Academic Program and Curriculum Committee reviewed the program reports and assigned scores on program quality and need for attention. On behalf of the comprehensive review group, the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee forwarded to the provost the scores and review comments on 31 programs identified as "in need of attention." In April, 1998, the provost requested the advice of the Academic Program and Curriculum Committee and the Committee on Reviews as to further actions recommended for the 16 undergraduate programs and 15 graduate programs identified. The APCC and COR, following consultation with respective deans and departments, submitted to the provost the following recommendations, along with suggestions for implementation:


PhD Masters Undergraduate
Strengthen

Library & Info. Sciences
Film
Social Work
Mass Communication
Human Kinetics
Film
Mass Communication
Art History
Bio. Aspects of Conserv.
Women's Studies
Provide Attention to Maintain Program Strength Chemistry
Physics
English
Foreign Language and Literature Chemistry
Physics
Health Sciences
Human Kinetics
Curriculum and Instruc.
Materials Engineering
Dance
Consolidate Mathematics Music
Reorganize
Public Administration
Urban Studies
Music
Music Education
Phase Out Geography
Geosciences

Italian
Slavic Languages

The provost accepted these recommendations and requested that the deans overseeing programs identified in need of attention work with the departments involved to develop plans addressing the recommendations. The provost also invited proposals for $250,000 for one-time allocations in 1998-99 and permanent allocations beginning in 1999-00. Plans and proposals were submitted with the annual planning documents.

Actions in response to the PAR recommendations to date have focused most intently on the programs identified for strengthening or for phasing out. Upon the advice of the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee, the provost allocated 1998-99 1-time PAR funding and 1999-00 base PAR funding to programs identified for strengthening. These allocations are also summarized in the resource section of this planning document.

Update on programs identified for strengthening

Library and Information Science MA: The goal for the program is to maintain the strength and instructional capacity while supporting faculty scholarship. The program received $60,022 in 1-time 1998-99 PAR funds and $90,000 in base 1999-00 PAR funds to support a new faculty position, graduate assistants, and supplies and expenses.

Film MA and BA: The Dean continued a multi-year plan to provide supplies and expenses while supporting additional faculty lines. The program received $41,800 in 1-time 1998-99 PAR funding ($20,900 from the provost and $20,900 from the dean) to fund equipment needs, and $62,000 in base 1999-2000 funding ($31,000 each from the provost and the dean) for a new faculty line and two graduate teaching assistants.

Social Work MA: The program will maintain its current capacity and increase faculty productivity. With an allocation of $60,000 in base 1999-2000 PAR funds from the provost, the program will have additional support for two clinical assistant professors. (The provost is also allocating $50,000 in 1999-2000 Campus Opportunity Funds to seed the development of a Joint Partnership program for Social Welfare and Outreach and Continuing Education to provide courses for certification for social workers.)

Mass Communication MA and BA: The dean plans two faculty positions to support the program, with a particular focus on building the areas of advertising/public relations and urban journalism, and to work in these areas with both high school and college students. The provost provided the College with $80,412 in 1-time 1998-99 PAR funds to increase instruction; the College provided additional instructional funds.

Human Kinetics MS: The School of Allied Health Professions instituted a comprehensive reorganization plan which will strengthen this program. The Human Kinetics department, with the addition of the new Physical Therapy program, is becoming the Department of Physical Therapy and Kinesiology. The combined faculties are naturally aligned to collaborate in research endeavors and funding opportunities will be enhanced. Collaborations with members of other UWM, MCW, and MSOE departments represent early efforts to develop a group of Laboratory Affiliate Researchers. The Recreation program is joining Occupational Therapy to form the new Department of Occupational Therapy. The provost supported the Kinesiology (Human Kinetics) program with $60,000 in 1-time 1998-99 PAR funds for equipment and $31,000 in base 1999-2000 PAR funds (matched by $16,500 from the dean) to support a research specialist, graduate teaching assistant, and supplies and expenses.

Art History BA: Art History faculty have focused on increasing interdepartmental connections and integration of courses in film and television. Collaborations are also being pursued with the School of the Arts and the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The dean is working with the program on developing areas of future focus, and anticipates requesting campus 2000-01 PAR support for a Curator/Programmer for film and video.

Biological Aspects of Conservation BS: Administration of the program, which has been needed but not supported, will be provided. The provost provided $18,103 in 1-time 1998-99 PAR support and $12,000 in base 1999-2000 PAR funds to support partially a faculty director. The College is supporting a 25% lecturer appointment.

Women's Studies: The Graduate School and the College of Letters and Science have developed a major reorganization plan to strengthen both the research and instructional components of Women's Studies. The instructional component will be transferred to the College of Letters and Science, and plans are being developed to support a new major and department of Women's Studies. A Research Institute in Women's Studies will be developed in the Graduate School. The provost provided $22,000 in base 1999-00 PAR funds to support a project assistant and graduate teaching assistant; the Graduate School provided a match for a .75 administrative program specialist and a 2-year appointment of a social scientist post-doctoral fellow.

Update on programs identified for phasing out

Geography PhD: The program is undergoing a focused review, utilizing the advice of consultants, to determine its opportunities to refocus. The provost has asked the program for a plan by Fall, 2000 before determining, with the dean, whether the program will be continued with direction or phased out.

Geosciences PhD: Admission of doctoral students has been suspended as the program undergoes changes in response to the PAR report. The faculty have voted to eliminate the PhD program. Atmospheric Science faculty are leaving the department to join the Department of Mathematics; other Geoscience faculty are investigating other campus areas for research and doctoral education affiliation.

Italian and Slavic Languages BA: The provost recently initiated discussions with the dean regarding the future of these majors within the larger context of language programs and instruction.

Update on other programs identified as needing attention

The School/College Planning Documents include additional plans for programs identified in the PAR other than those listed above. Of particular note are the plans to build research productivity in the natural science departments, including Chemistry and Physics, identified in the PAR as needing additional attention to maintain their strength and quality. The College of Letters and Science plans to recruit six faculty in Physics and Chemistry, and focused its resource requests for PAR and Campus Opportunity Funds on assistance in starting costs for research faculty. The provost provided $109,078 in 1-time 1998-99 PAR funds to the College, indicating that College funds freed up by this PAR allocation support these faculty start-up costs. In addition, the provost provided $200,000 in 1-time 1999-00 Campus Opportunity Funds to provide additional start-up support for natural science faculty. The Department of Mathematical Sciences, responding to the recommended consolidation, has expanded its Applied Mathematics emphasis and has been joined by the four atmospheric science faculty formerly in Geosciences.

Next Steps: The Program Array Review process challenged the faculty and administration to conduct a thorough self-analysis. Out of the process came agreement on factors by which programs should be evaluated and a growing sense of the expectations faculty hold for their campus peers. The overwhelming conclusion of the PAR faculty review committees was that UWM is made up of a broad array of programs which continually demonstrate quality in research, teaching, and outreach despite limited resources. The PAR committees also recognized the need for UWM to invest its limited resources in programs of the highest quality, even if that means curtailing support for other fine programs.

As the campus prepares for the 2000-2001 PAR funding allocation process, the faculty will be conducting a thorough assessment of the analysis used in the PAR process, and will recommend modifications, if necessary, for ongoing campus program array review. The faculty senate will determine if a comprehensive simultaneous PAR process will be repeated in the near future. Even if such a comprehensive process is not repeated, elements of the PAR analysis have been incorporated in the 10-year program review process, offering an opportunity to assess continually the quality of ongoing programs and the need to reallocate campus resources to support those programs which most successfully meet the campus expectations and UWM's strategic goals.

Program Reviews

Significant progress was made in 1998-99 in ongoing reviews of academic programs:

Undergraduate Program - Status
Clinical Laboratory Science - Done
Health Care Administration - Done
Architectural Studies - In progress
Education - In progress
Educational Studies - Done
Engineering - Done
Art - In progress
Art Education - In progress
Inter-Arts - In progress
Music Education - In progress
Theatre - Done
Applied Mathematics & Physics - Done
Art History & Criticism - In progress
Biological Aspects of Conservation - In progress
Biological Sciences - In progress
Film Studies - In progress
History - Done
International Studies - Done
Linguistics - Done
Mass Communication - Done
Physics - In progress
Psychology - In progress
Social Work - In progress

Graduate Programs - Status
Clinical Laboratory Science - In progress
Urban Planning - Done
Administrative Leadership - In progress
Curriculum & Instruction - In progress
Educational Psychology - In progress
Educational Rehabilitation & Counseling - In progress
Art - In progress
Art Education - In progress
Art History & Criticism - In progress
Biological Sciences - In progress
Economics - In progress
History - In progress
Mass Communication - In progress
Library & Information Science - In progress


4. Enriching the learning experience of UWM students.

A. Efforts to improve student retention and graduation rates are effective.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 3 5 3 4 4 3
3 5



Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 4 3 4 4 1 3

For the fourth consecutive year, the retention rate of new freshmen increased. The one-year retention rate for the most recent cohort - freshmen entering in Fall, '97 and enrolled in Fall '98 - increased to 69.8% from 68.5% the previous year. The percentage of students entering as freshmen graduated or still enrolled after six years remained at 44% for the most recent measurable cohort - the freshman class of 1992. Progress is clearly being made, albeit incrementally. Credits to degree, however, continue to increase rather than decrease.


Indicators = 97-98

SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
6-YEAR FRESHMEN GRADUATION RATES (GRADUATED OR STILL ENROLLED AS OF 1997-98)

42.8%


61.2%


53.5%


46.2%


44.4%


NA


41.1%


47.2%


31.0%


46.2%


44.4%
CREDITS TO DEGREE FOR NEW FRESHMEN

139.0


122.5


124.0


142.0


126.0


NA


136.0


150.0


147.0


123.0


130.0
1-YEAR RETENTION OF NEW FRESHMEN (AS OF 1997-98)

73.0%


80.5%


70.0%


68.6%


66.1%


NA


64.2%


73.3%


71.8%


70.4%


68.5%


B. The undergraduate and graduate learning experiences are being improved by effective student outcomes assessments.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DSAD UWM
Current Progress 4 4 3 2 4 4 5 3 4 4 3 2

Some units describe effective student outcomes assessments that are in place. However, UWM has not progressed in developing and institutionalizing assessment of student learning outcomes as part of its strategic approach to improving student learning. Assessment of learning is still based, in too many programs, on the time students and faculty put into each course and grades in individual courses, rather than being based on skills and knowledge gained and success of students upon completion of their total educational experiences.


5. Expanding UWM's urban mission and reinforce the university's commitment to enhancing the quality of life and economic base of the Milwaukee metropolitan area and the State of Wisconsin.

A. Community partnerships and alliances, research and scholarship that address community and state issues, and student community placements that contribute to the student learning experience are increasing.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 5 5 3 4 4 5 3 5 4



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 4 3 4 3 3 4 5 4

With Chancellor Zimpher's leadership of The Milwaukee Idea, all campus units are focusing on strategies across the university and within units which strengthen UWM's partnerships with its communities. Over the summer, the action plans for the First Ideas will be developed, which will not only launch the ideals of the Milwaukee Idea, but also serve as models of interdisciplinary activities which connect the research, teaching and outreach strengths of UWM with the urban community.


6. Stabilizing enrollments and resources.

A. The unit is meeting its enrollment/revenue targets and student program completion goals.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DOCE DSAD Student Affairs UWM
Current Progress
3 5 4
5 4 2 2 4 3 3 5 5

For the first time in five years, the campus attained its Fall, 1998 FTE enrollment target established by UW-System Enrollment Management III. It was still necessary, however, to "buy back" outreach credits to attain this goal. Given our enrollment projections, we expect to meet our Fall, 1999 FTE target without needing to convert any credit outreach FTE.

The following table summarizes the optimal Fall enrollment planning ranges that have been negotiated between the provost and unit deans over the past several years as UWM has needed to increase enrollments to meet UWS targets. "Optimal ranges" represent estimates, based on the unit's historical delivery of FTE student credits hours per instructional staff, of the enrollments that can be supported on the unit's base budget, given no additional revenues or increases in instructional efficiencies. All schools/colleges are, or will be, in their optimal Fall enrollment planning range next Fall or the Fall of 2000, with the exception of the School of Business, where enrollments currently exceed the optimal estimated range.

The table also provides the Fall enrollment targets that have been established for each school/college for Fall, 1999. It is anticipated, as the UW-System progresses from EMIII to EM 21 and as UWM meets and exceeds its enrollment expectations, that Fall enrollment targets will become an increasingly insignificant measure. Rather, annual enrollments, and the tuition revenues generated by those enrollments, are becoming the more significant measure at both the UW System level and the campus level.

As a first step in moving toward annual projections, an annual tuition revenue target has been established for each School and College, as summarized in the table. The unit tuition revenue target is calculated on the actual tuition revenues earned in 1998-99 and adjusted for enrollment changes built into the unit's Fall enrollment target. The revenue targets listed below are estimates at this time; they will be adjusted for final 1998-99 revenues and for tuition rate increases in 1999-2000.

Tuition revenues earned at the school/college level in excess of the tuition revenue target will be returned to the unit at an 80% rate, with 20% remaining at the campus level to fund campus-wide needs as defined in our long-range planning - Planning for UWM's Future.

Fund 101 Enrollments and Revenues


Optimal FTE Target Range Fall, 1998 Actual Optimal Target Range FTE SCH/Instructional Staff Fall, 1998 FTE SCH/Instructional Staff Fall, 1999 Enrollment Target Planned Enrollment Growth Adjusted FY 98-9 Tuition Revenues FY 99-0 Tuition Revenue Target Planned Revenue Growth
SAHP 667 -717 629 14.5 - 15.0 11.7 667 1.060 2,522,269 2,673,605 151,336(6.0%)
SARUP 510 - 525 518 13.5 - 14.0 13.2 520 1.004 2,128,237 2,146,790 8,553 (0.4%)
SOA 1,174 - 1,229 1,224 11.1 - 11.5 11.6 1,224 1.000 4,332,995 4,332,995 0 (0.0%)
SBA 1,600 -1,700 1,891 20.4 - 21.7 24.1 1,894 1.002 8,785,877 8,803,449 17,572 (0.2%)
SOE 1,085 - 1,135 1,051 13.1 - 13.6 12.2 1,102 1.049 4,627,607 4,854,360 226,753 (4.9%)
CEAS 835 - 914 858 10.5 - 11.5 10.3 858 1.000 3,075,303 3,075,303 0 (0.0%)
L&S 8,641 - 9,176 8,370 16.5 - 17.5 15.5 8,555 1.022 28,976,519 29,614,002 637,483 (2.2%)
SLIS 176 -181 166 17.0 17.5 12.8 176 1.060 1,128,330 1,196,030 67,700 (6.0%)
SON 510 - 530 471 9.5 - 10.0 10.9 490 1.040 1,556,301 1,618,553 62,252 (4.0%)
SW 531 -547 528 17.5 - 18.0 15.1 528 1.000 2,535,642 2,535,642 0 (0.0%)
 
UWM 16,200 - 17,125 15,706 15.0 - 15.5 14.6 16,014 1.020 59,679,080 60,850,729 1,171,649 (2.0%)


Indicator = 97-98 degrees/FTE instructional staff

DEGREES CONFERRED

SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
BACHELORS 3.3 2.7 5.8 2.0 1.3 NA 1.3 2.3 5.0 5.7 2.2
MASTERS 0.6 1.9 2.0 0.6 0.3 8.7 0.4 2.3 1.0 4.5 1.0
DOCTORAL

0.1 0.1 0.1 0
0.1 0.3
0.1
TOTAL 3.9 4.6 8.5 2.7 1.7 8.7 1.7 4.8 6.3 10.2 3.3

B. The unit is progressing in implementing the campus Adult Access Plan.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 2 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 3



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 4 3 5 4 1 4


The campus has progressed in meeting the needs of adult and returning students in a number of ways. An ad hoc group recently reported to the chancellor and provost on the campus response to the recommendations made by the Adult Access Working Group. In that report, the group noted considerable achievements in courses, programs and services for adult and returning students. The group also listed several recommendations for furthering progress, and identified the following action steps:

  • Program Structure: While some courses and programs have been offered on weekends, UWM needs to further increase adult programming on the UWM campus during weekends, offer programs scheduled for adult learners (variations of "standard" 16 week semesters), and become an active participant in online delivery.
  • Learning Sites: One or two off-campus sites should be leased, and programs/courses should be offered at those sites.
  • Programmatic Ideas: Departments should again be surveyed for adult access ideas to capture the growth in programming since they were last surveyed. The survey will also serve to initiate campus discussions and planning for EM 21.
  • Incentives: Departments offering adult access programming need to be assured of revenue return to cover their costs. Similarly, faculty and instructional staff need to be assured of appropriate compensation and support, whether as part of their work loads or as overhead payments.
  • Policies and Procedures: We need to identify and modify UW-System and campus policies and procedures which are barriers to effectively serving adult students.
  • Evaluation: We need to develop both internal and external benchmarks related to UWM's performance and priorities in serving adult and returning students.
  • Leadership: While progress in serving adult and returning students has been achieved, the institution can benefit from targeted leadership in this effort. We recommend that the Associate Provost for Outreach assume this leadership role, working with the assistance of the ad hoc group and liaisons.

7. Ensuring that resource distribution and recruitment plans are consonant with strategic objectives and the maintenance of quality programs and services. Raising private funds to augment state funding.

A. The unit demonstrates effective actions in improving the efficient utilization of its resources.



SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 5 5 4 5 5 4 3 5 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 4 5 3 3 3 5 5 4

At a campus level, a number of strategies are in place to improve efficiencies of resource utilization and allocation:

  • The annual resource planning process itself provides an annual update from all units on campus strategic initiatives and goals.
  • The planning process has been designed to be as open and fair as possible, such that criteria defining for what purposes and how resources will be made available are published and utilized in resource decision-making. In keeping with this goal, the 1999-2000 planning process guidelines specified resources available for allocation and invited proposals from all campus units for initiatives in three areas: Implementation of the program array review; Campus Opportunity Funds; and Undergraduate Initiatives. In addition, the provost notified units at the beginning of the process of a number of allocation decisions that were made based on prior commitments; these are summarized in the resources allocation section of this document. At the same time, the provost also made allocations in the areas of laboratory modernization, desktop computers, and faculty recruitment and retention at the beginning of the process. These allocations transferred base budget funds in the vice chancellor's holding account to the base budgets of the schools/colleges and divisions. By doing so, the provost provided the deans and other unit heads the long-term authority and oversight of these base budget funds. Desktop computer access funds were allocated in proportion to the Faculty FTE; Classroom and Laboratory Modernization funds were allocated per formula that accounted for 101-2 budget, FTE SCH produced, the Faculty FTE, and the unit's 10-year history of prior Class/Lab mod. allocations.
  • The Program Array Review provided a process for assessing investments of resources in academic programs and a methodology for recommending financial attention for high quality program.
  • A review of administrative functions will be initiated in Fall, 1999 to review and ensure effective utilization of resources in the non-academic functions of the university.

SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
TOTAL REVENUES/STAFF ($000)
(excludes general purpose revenue and financial aid)


38.9


44.5


77.5


67.5


44.0


60.8


32.9


51.2


32.6


77.5


37.7
TOTAL EXPENDITURES/STAFF ($000)
(includes state funds only; excludes fringe benefits)


50.6


55.9


65.6


88.4


48.8


47.4


52.2


55.9


49.8


62.1


74.0

"Revenues per staff" and "expenditures per staff" are not directly comparable. These data are most meaningful when analyzed over time for any one unit. Nonetheless, the summary table alone generally reflects that the relationship of tuition revenues generated and the state resources utilized varies widely across units. The differences are, to a great extent, inherent in disciplinary approaches to instruction. For example, instructional programs highly dependent on laboratories or clinical settings expend more than other programs.


B. A unit fund raising plan and campaign is in place and meeting its goals.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
Current Progress 2 4 2 2 5 3 5 3 5 4 3

Selected units have engaged in extremely successful fund raising campaigns. The self-assessed rankings are good indicators of which schools/colleges have been particularly strong in this area. The formulation of the Milwaukee Idea over the past several months has formed the basis for a campus capital campaign that will begin taking shape in the 1999-2000 fiscal year.


C. The unit's 1998-99 recruitment activities in preparation for hiring for1999-2000 are approved and continue to be consistent with 1999-2000 resource plans.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
Current Progress 4 4 5 5 5 3 3 3 5 5 4


D. The unit collaborates effectively with other campus units in program development, support for multidisciplinary programs, and support for research and outreach initiatives.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 4 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 4 4 3 4 5 5 3

Many examples of effective cross-unit collaboration in program development and offerings exist. However, far too much isolation and insulation continue to hamper successful interdisciplinary cooperation and productivity.


E. The unit minimizes duplication of academic courses and programs and student and administrative services supported in other campus units.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 3 4 5 1 4 5 3 5 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 4 5 4 2 4 4 5 3

While the units may accurately rate themselves as effectively minimizing duplication of academic programs and administrative services, duplication does exist. Duplication is not necessarily a bad thing, but if combined or centralized approaches match or exceed effectiveness and gain efficiencies, then such duplications must be reviewed and eliminated whenever appropriate. The administrative functional review process that will be implemented in 1999-2000 will examine these areas.

8. Expanding technology. Employ appropriate information and communication technology to improve the academic, student service and administrative operations of the campus.

A. A unit technology plan that is consistent with the campus Learning through Technology Plan is in place and being implemented.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 4 5 4 4 5 3 4 4 1



Administrative Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 4 2 5 3 1 4


B. The unit's plans for technology funds are consistent with its technology plan and adhere to the guidelines dictating campus use of technology funds.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
Current Progress 5 3 5 NA 4 5 2 4 4 2 3


C. Satisfactory access is being provided for faculty and staff to desktop technology.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 5 5 5 4 5 5 3 5 4 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 5 5 5 4 3 5 5 4

The unit's reports summarized in the following table indicate, with the exception of the School of the Arts and the Division of Students Affairs, that 100% - or close to 100% - of faculty and staff have access to desktop computers. The campus goal continues to be to provide access - for those faculty and staff who require such access - to updated desktop technologies.

Indicator = please complete table


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
% of faculty with access to desktop computers (98-99) 100 100 100 96 100 100 70 100 95 100
% of staff with access to desktop computers (98-99) 100 100 100 100 100 100 70 100 80 100
Target % of faculty with access to desktop computers (2000-01) 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
Target % of staff with access to desktop computers (2000-01) 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 90 100



Administrative Affairs

Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School
% of faculty with access to desktop computers (98-99)

100



% of staff with access to desktop computers (98-99) 100 60 100 99 100 100 100
Target % of faculty with access to desktop computers (2000-01)

100



Target % of staff with access to desktop computers (2000-01) 100 60 100 100 100 100 100

D. Technology projects enhance student learning experiences.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
Current Progress 5 3 5 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4


E. State funds are being augmented with extramural support for technology.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
Current Progress 4 4 5 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 3


F. The unit is planning and addressing modifications needed to be Year 2000 capable: The unit has inventoried its computer hardware, software, and other equipment with time or date sensitive components central to its operation; if appropriate, vendor-supplied hardware, software, or services are certified as Year 2000 capable; and any Y2K problems have either been corrected or documented.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 5 3 5 4 2 4 3 4 4 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 4 4 3 4 5 5 4

The campus has formed a Y2K review team to assess and address the Y2K readiness at the campus and unit levels.


9. Enhancing the campus environment: Improving the support systems and physical facilities that make the campus environment conducive to learning and working.


A. The unit is planning and conducting activities which effectively improve connections between students, faculty, and staff within the unit and across the university.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 4 5 3 5 5 4 2 4 4



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 4 4 4 4 5 4


B. The unit has a plan and system in place for effective communication regarding its plans and initiatives with unit faculty and staff, other units, campus administration and governance groups.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 5 4 5 3 5 5 5 2 4 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 4 4 4 3 5 2


Despite sincere efforts on the part of campus and school/college administration, departments, faculty, and staff to communicate plans and concerns, effective communication continues to be a great challenge and a great concern for the UWM community.


C. Unit governance and advisory groups are included in resource, program and strategic planning.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 4 5 4 5 4 5 3 5 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 4 4 4 3 5 4


The University Committee has appointed a special ad hoc committee to examine the role of governance groups in school/college planning and decision making. The roles of the Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee and the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee continue to evolve and gain clarity.


D. The unit addresses issues raised in survey assessments and responds to improve student satisfaction.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 3 5 3 4 5 4 4 4 4



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 4 3 4 3 3 4

Units attend to the student survey information, as evident in the planning documents. Student concerns continue to focus on improved parking and desire for a stronger campus community and student experience.


Indicator = Graduating senior responses to selected items for selected years of survey


1998 GRADUATES


SAHP


SARUP


SBA


CEAS


L&S


SLIS


SOA


SOE


SON


SW


UWM
QUALITY OF EDUCATION
EXCELLENT/GOOD
14.8/80.2 18.9/67.6 17.2/70.0 5.3/65.8 9.4/81.1 NA/NA 15.3/63.9 11.8/76.5 9.1/75.0 13.5/76.4 12.4/71.6
HELPFUL FACULTY/STAFF
FREQUENTLY/SOMETIMES
55.0/43.8 60.5/36.8 45.2/49.2 29.7/58.1 50.0/47.9 NA/NA 38.9/61.1 51.8/44.6 42.9/57.1 50.0/48.9 44.7/51.5
QUALITY ADVISING 69.6 62.2 73.4 39.5 56.9 NA 61.1 54.7 70.5 68.9 62.1
FEEL PREPARED FOR FUTURE 77.2 73.7 77.3 64.0 73.1 NA 55.1 70.6 79.5 75.0 69.9
FEEL PREPARED FOR CAREER 87.0 65.8 72.0 66.7 55.1 NA 47.9 71.4 79.5 72.1 67.9
COMMITTED TO UWM 50.0 47.4 40.4 25.7 32.1 NA 24.7 35.3 30.2 30.2 33.8
PARTICIPATED IN EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 45.7 42.1 45.4 53.8 28.3 NA 40.5 48.8 34.8 34.4 41.7
WOULD CHOOSE UWM AGAIN
DEFINITELY/MAYBE
36.3/53.8 44.4/38.9 30.7/56.4 14.5/56.6 32.1/56.6 NA/NA 21.1/57.7 25.3/61.4 27.3/54.5 34.8/53.9 27.4/56.2


E. A faculty/staff development plan is in place and internal allocations are budgeted to support the plan.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 4 5 3 4 5 3 4 3 3



Administrative Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 4 3 3 4 5 3


10. Achieving the goals of the Milwaukee Initiative/Commitment:

A. The unit is achieving success with its programs and activities directed toward increasing the diversity of its students and their successful completion of their academic goals.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 2 4 3 3 4 3 2 4 3 4



Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 5 3 4 4 3 5 3


The diversity of the student population, as measured by the percentage of multicultural students, has continued to increase since the inception of the Milwaukee Initiative. The goals of the Milwaukee Commitment challenge the campus to create an academic and student support environment that will attract and retain multicultural students in proportions closer to those of the metropolitan Milwaukee area. The data below show that the completion rate of multicultural students lags behind that of the overall undergraduate and graduate populations.


Indicator = underrepresented students enrolled 97-98




SAHP


SARUP


SBA


CEAS


L&S


SLIS


SOA


SOE


SON


SW


UWM
# OF UNDERREPRESENTED UNDERGRADUATES 90 61 394 418 962 NA 107 418 97 165 2663
UNDERREPRESENTED AS % OF UNDERGRADUATES 9.0% 9.3% 13.3% 22.3% 17.3% NA 8.5% 22.3% 12.6% 20.2% 15.0%
# OF UNDERREPRESENTED GRADUATES 4 11 26 168 89 14 7 168 13 51 406
UNDERREPRESENTED AS % OF GRADUATES 3.8% 5.3% 3.1% 18.2% 8.1% 4.7% 6.0% 18.2% 6.7% 11.1% 8.8%


Indicator = underrepresented students graduating 97-98



SAHP


SARUP


SBA


CEAS


L&S


SLIS


SOA


SOE


SON


SW


UWM
# OF UNDERREPRESENTED BACHELORS DEGREES 9 7 37 10 73 NA 13 53 17 35 254
UNDERREPRESENTED AS % OF BACHELORS DEGREES 5.5% 7.2% 8.3% 6.4% 10.8% NA 9.0% 23.9% 11.0% 18.8% 11.3%
# OF UNDERREPRESENTED GRADUATE DEGREES 1 1 8 1 13 1 2 31 1 15 74
UNDERREPRESENTED AS % OF GRADUATE DEGREES 3.2% 1.4% 3.8% 1.8% 5.7% 1.1% 4.5% 13.4% 2.5% 10.4% 6.5%


B. Productive steps are being taken to enhance the climate for underrepresented students and the unit's and institution's reputation as supportive of diversity.

SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 3 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 4 5 4 3 4 5 3



C. Unit graduates are prepared, through the unit curricula, to work in a multicultural world and workplace.

SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
Current Progress
4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 5 3


11. Meeting equal opportunity expectations for faculty, staff and students.

A. The unit demonstrates equitable tenure and promotion rates of minority/nonminority faculty and staff.

SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 3 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 5 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 4 5 4 5 4 5 4


1998-99 PROMOTION ACTIONS TOTAL WOMEN MINORITY

Current Changes of Status
Promotion to Associate Professor 14 9 3
Promotion at Rank 1 0 1
Promotion to Full Professor 25 11 6
Appointment at Associate Professor 1 1 0
Appointment at Full Professor 1 1 1

Pending
Promotion to Associate 0 0 0
Promotion to Full 2 0 0

Out-of-Cycle (approved)
Promotion to Full 0 0 0
Promotion to Associate 0 0 0
Appointment at Full 4 3 0
Appointment at Associate 0 0 0

One denial occurred in 1998-99: an Asian male was denied promotion to full professor at the divisional level. The promotion will be reconsidered in 1999-2000.

B. The unit demonstrates equitable tenure and promotion rate of female/male faculty and staff.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 5 3 NA 4 5 4


C. The unit demonstrates equitable career development of probationary faculty and staff .


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 3 3 NA 4 5 4


D. The unit demonstrates evidence of effective mentoring and affirmative promotions of women and minorities in administrative positions.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 4 3 5 4 4 4 3 4 3 5



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 3 5 4 4 NA 4 5 4


E. An affirmative action plan is in place and goals are being accomplished, including recruitment goals for minority and female faculty and staff.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW
Current Progress 1 3 5 4 4 4 3 4 3 4



Administrative Affairs Student Affairs DOCE DSAD I&MT GML Graduate School UWM
Current Progress 4 5 4 2 NA 5 5 4


F. The unit is effectively monitoring enrollments and degrees granted by gender, and addressing issues of student access and success.


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW DSAD UWM
Current Progress 4 3 5 3 3 4 5 4 5 4 2 4



Indicator = 97-98


SAHP SARUP SBA CEAS L&S SLIS SOA SOE SON SW UWM
FEMALES AS % OF UNDERGRADUATES 76.4 27.1 44.5 14.8 54.9 NA 54.8 72.7 86.0 64.5 54.3
FEMALES AS % OF GRADUATES 83.8 39.4 44.5 18.7 50.8 79.2 62.4 75.9 93.8 83.3 59.8
FEMALES AS % OF BACHELORS DEGREES 82.3 19.6 48.4 14.0 53.3 NA 56.9 78.9 81.8 62.9 55.8
FEMALES AS % OF MASTERS DEGREES 93.5 44.3 41.1 17.8 55.2 76.1 59.5 78.4 100 86.8 64.0
FEMALES AS % OF DOCTORAL DEGREES
100 0 20.0 42.2 NA
50.0 87.5 42.2 41.2


B. 1999-00 BUDGET ALLOCATIONS

The major base budget allocations by unit are summarized at the conclusion of this section and are described below.

1. Allocations made at the onset of the budget planning process.

The 1999-00 planning process began in September, 1998 with the distribution of guidelines for the process and announcement of allocations that were being made to (1) distribute to the base budgets of schools, colleges and divisions funds formerly held centrally in the vice chancellor's contingency for laboratory modernization and faculty recruitment and retention, and (2) meet commitments made prior to the budget planning process. In previous years, units competed for these centrally-held funds, making it difficult for them to predict funding they could plan on applying to equipment and recruitment needs. The distribution of lab. mod. funds was based on a formula which included the 101-2 budget, FTE SCH of the unit, FTE faculty, and the ten-year history of lab. mod. allocations. In total, $754,900 was distributed to unit base budgets for lab. mod. expenditures. All base budget recruitment and retention funds held by the vice chancellor - $143,582- were allocated on the basis of the percentage of indirect costs generated by the unit. In addition, the vice chancellor allocated to the schools and colleges the $500,000 of indirect costs that had previously augmented his recruitment and retention fund. These funds were distributed for 1999-00 based on the percentage of actual indirect costs generated by the unit in 1998-99.

Prior commitments made for 1999-2000 totaled $315,000, and included the required institutional match for funds received from UW System, base allocations to I&MT for ongoing network and technology expenses, and other obligations made to deans in prior years.

2. Allocations to implement the recommendations from the Program Array Review (PAR).

The vice chancellor committed $250,000 in 1999-00 base budget support for activities implementing the PAR recommendations. In order to put these funds to work in the 1998-99 fiscal year, the vice chancellor requested proposals from deans for both one-time uses in 1998-99 and base budget support in 1999-2000. The vice chancellor was advised by the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee in reviewing proposals and making allocations.

One-time commitments for the 1999-2000 year:

College of Letters and Science - $109,078

To fund activities described in the proposals submitted for programs identified in need of strengthening in the Program Array Review (Mass Communications and Biological Aspects of Conservation). The vice chancellor noted in his allocation letter that if the college had already made adjustments to fund the activities proposed, the allocated funds should be utilized to further support the findings and recommendations of the Program Array Review. For the College of Letters and Science, this allocation enabled the support of activities strengthening Mass Communications and Biological Aspects of Conservation and start-up costs for research faculty in Chemistry and Physics.

School of Library and Information Science - $60,022

To fund the graduate assistants, equipment, and supply and expenses requested in the proposal for the master's program in Library and Information Science, identified in the PAR as a program in need of strengthening.

School of Allied Health Professions - $60,000

To fund the motion analysis system requested in the proposal for the master's program in Human Kinetics, identified in the PAR as a program in need of strengthening.

School of the Arts - $20,900

To fund equipment and remodeling requested in the proposal for the Film program, identified in the PAR as a program in need of strengthening.

The vice chancellor and the faculty Academic Planning and Budget Committee applied the following criteria in reviewing proposals for base funding support for PAR recommendations:



  • The budget request is consistent with a long-range plan for the program.
  • PAR funds are essential to the plan for the program; i.e. these funds are not replacing other funds available to support these activities.
  • The proposal adequately describes how funds will be used and the anticipated measurable outcomes.
  • The proposal addresses recommendations of the Program Array Review.
  • The funding request is reasonable and proportional to the total amount available for allocation.
  • Matching funds, if required, are sufficient in amount and the source is adequately described.

The 1999-00 base funding allocations totaling $257,000 are summarized below. Descriptions of the activities supported by these funds and the unit matches are provided in Part A of this document under section 3. A (pp. 10-14).


PAR BASE FUNDING DECISIONS SUMMARY
Program 1999-2000 Base PAR Requests Provost Funding Decision
SLIS MA
Unit match: not required
$219,022 $90,000
Film BFA, MA and MFA
Unit match: $31,000
$31,000 $31,000
MSW
Unit match: not required
$80,000 $60,000
Mass Communications MA and BA
Unit match: ad hoc instruction and funds to bring senior lecturer to full academic year salary
$11,000 $11,000
Human Kinetics MS
Unit match (not required): $16,500
$31,035 $31,000
Biological Aspects of Conservation BS
Unit match: 25% of lecturer appointment
$12,000 $12,000
Women's Studies
Unit match: salary for 0.75FTE administrative program specialist and 2-year post-doc. appointment
$32,000 $22,000
TOTAL FUNDS REQUESTED FROM PROGRAMS IDENTIFIED FOR STRENGTHENING $416,057 $257,000

REQUESTS FROM PROGRAMS NOT IDENTIFIED IN NEED OF STRENGTHENING:
Chemistry PhD and BS . . . $100,000
Physics PhD and BS . . . $145,500
Health Sciences BS . . . $40,000
Human Kinetics BS . . . $35,000
Dance BFA and BA . . . $50,000


REQUESTS FROM PROGRAMS NOT IDENTIFIED BY PAR
Computer Science . . . $28,000
Mechanical Engineering . . . $54,000
Architecture and Urban Planning . . . $10,000


3. Allocations of undergraduate initiative funds.

The vice chancellor allocated all of his remaining Undergraduate Initiatives funds on a matching basis to units in support of new student service/academic support positions. The Academic Administrative Policy Committee reviewed the applications and made allocation recommendations which the vice chancellor modified slightly in the following decisions. Criteria for successful proposals included: anticipated impact on student recruitment and retention; collaboration with other units; provision of direct services to undergraduate students; and justification of need for the position.

Undergraduate Academic Advisor, School of Business Administration ($22,000)

Learning Disabilities Student Services Specialist, Student Accessibility Center ($22,000)

Freshman Academic Advisor, College of Letters and Science ($22,000)

Transfer Student Services Coordinator, Enrollment Services ($14,000)

Co-op Coordinator/Academic Advisor, Engineering and Applied Science ($22,000)

Student Information Specialist, School of Education ($22,000)

Coordinator of Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students, Architecture and Urban Planning ($6,100)



OTHER PROPOSALS SUBMITTED BUT NOT FUNDED

DSAD:
Program Manager of Students with Physical Disabilities $22,000
Program Manager of Supported Education (Services for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities) $22,000
Advisor Position (#2) $22,000
Learning Specialist $22,000
Retention Specialist $22,000
GML:
Reserve Materials Cataloger/Internet Resources Assistant $22,000
Electronic Reserve Coordinator $30,600
Minority Studies Librarian $37,000
GIS Librarian $18,500
I&MT:
Classroom Support Media Specialist $22,000
Manager of Campus Computer Labs $22,000
Unix Support Staff $22,000
PeopleSoft/Data Warehouse Project Administrator $22,000
Asynchronous Training Coordinator $22,000
SW:
Undergraduate Advisor Position $22,000
L&S:
Internship Coordinator $22,000
Coordinator of the Peer Mentoring Center $22,000
University Honors student services/academic support position $22,000
STUDENT AFFAIRS:
Student Life: Student Development/Service Learning Coordinator $12,000
Enrollment Services: Evening Advising/Service Center Coordinator $14,000
Financial Aid and Student Employment Services: Career Counselor $15,000
SLIS:
Academic Advisor $22,000


4. Allocation of Campus Opportunity Funds.

In anticipation of meeting the UWS enrollment target in Fall, 1999, the vice chancellor invited proposals for a "Campus Opportunity Fund", redirecting funds that were needed in prior Fall semesters to "buy out" outreach credits in order to meet the UWS enrollment target. The solicitation of proposals for the Campus Opportunity Fund also continued, from the previous planning year, the opportunity for faculty and staff from across the campus units to submit contributions to an "idea bank" for potential funding opportunities. The following criteria were distributed, along with the invitation for proposals, with guidelines for the 1999-2000 planning documents:

  • The proposed activities are appropriate for effective utilization of one-time funds in 1999-00.
  • The activities are collaborative and make efficient and effective use of activities in other campus units.
  • The proposed activities are highly likely to yield additional resources for the unit and campus.
  • The unit is prepared to match a campus investment with its own funds.

The Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee reviewed and ranked the 56 proposals submitted, employing the vice chancellor's criteria plus the following:

  • The activities support UWM's strategic goal to become a premier urban research university
  • The activities support infrastructure needs.

Projects funded reflect the CBAC recommendations as well as responses of units to the vice chancellor's request to provide additional information. The Center for Forensics Science, which will receive a one-time seed fund of $100,000, was developed following the collaboration of the College of Letters and Science and the Schools of Allied Health and Social Welfare. The vice chancellor requested that these units work together after receiving two original proposals that were not collaborative and yet addressed similar needs and ideas. The vice chancellor elected to reserve some of the $1.0M for seed funding for the Milwaukee Idea in 1999-00.

All proposals are listed below, with the amounts allocated by the vice chancellor in the far right column:


Requests Funded
SBA:
Implementation of BA in Global Studies - Proposal submitted jointly with College of Letters and Science $405,050
Internet-Based Multimedia Distance Learning - Proposal submitted jointly with College of Engineering and Applied Science $152,242
DSAD:
Establishing UWM On-Campus Capacity for Real Time Captioning and Post-Production Captioning $90,000
UWM Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Learning Disabilities (LC) Coaching Clinic $62,900
American Multicultural Student Leadership Conference $50,000
Retention Initiative Proposal $153,945
GML:
Acquisitions $1.0 M
Student Salaries $50,000
Emergency Lighting and Automatic Lighting $50,000
Security Improvements $120,000
Facility Improvements $80,000
Hardware and Installation Requirements for the Endeavor Automation System $60,800
Academic Staff Salaries $90,000
I&MT:
Leveraging I&MT's Student Training (LIST) $118,000
SW:
Expansion of credit and non-credit extension - meet demand of professional social workers and police officers for certification $50,000 $50,000
Development of Masters of Science in Forensic Pathology
(Submitted with SAHP)
$132,000
SAHP:
Establishment of a Center of Rehabilitation Sciences and Technology $75,000
Development of a Master of Science Program in Forensic Pathology
(Submitted with SW)
$132,000 $100,000
Proposal to Establish a Graduate Program in Bio-Electrical Science $138,000 (SAHP,SW,L&S
Proposal for UWM Long-Term Care Program $70,800
DOCE:
An Analysis of the Post-Secondary Education and Employment Experience of Ten Years of High School Graduates at UWM, 1985-1995 $75,000  
An Interdisciplinary Proposal to Promote Youth Development in Milwaukee $75,000
CEAS:
Women's Engineering Service Program $75,000
Computer Science and Information Technology Initiatives and Service Functions $73,000
Internet-based Multimedia Distance Learning $152,242
Supporting Collaborative Research and Education over Distance - Videoconferencing over the vBNS $56,000 $46,000
Establishment of a Thermal Engineering Technology Laboratory for CEAS Undergraduate Students and MPS $150,000
Graduate Program in Bio-Electrical Science
$138,000
Biomaterials at the Nanoscale $70,000
Center for Design Visualization $150,000
GRAD:
Creating an Institute for Service Learning $73,661
SOE:
Interdisciplinary Certificate and Master's in Educational Technology $103,200 $103,200
SON:
Graduate Level Certificate Program $69,000
Interdisciplinary Health Professionals Education Initiative $65,000
SARUP:
Community Design Group: Enhancing the Quality of Life of Milwaukee Residents and Wisconsin's Communities through Participatory Development, Planning and Design Services $75,000
SLIS:
Electronic Archives Digitalization Program $65,000
Web-Based School Library Media Specialists Certification Program $98,000 $35,000
Center for Information Policy Research Program $65,550
L&S:
Reinvesting in Natural Science Research $200,000 $200,000
Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies $405,050
Bachelor of Arts in Computational Studies $160,000
Enrichment of Undergraduate Instruction (Edison Initiative) $208,200
Corporate University Programs $91,733 $66,000
Masters in Liberal Studies $61,050
Center for Industrial Mathematics $74,237
Enhancing Earth Science in Milwaukee Pre-College Classrooms $90,995
Biochemistry and Ecology of Pollutants in the Milwaukee Ri$ $103,000 $103,000
Technical Communication and Professional Writing Initiatives $51,000 $51,000
Film and Video Arts Facility $98,000
Certificate in Forensic Science Laboratory Experience $50,700
Web Courses in the Chemistry of Terrorist Chemical and Bio. Agents $96,346
Center for Economic Development and the Milwaukee Idea $115,700
Archeology and the "Environment of our Urban Environment" $79,881
Partnering with Milwaukee Public Schools to Recruit and Retain Promising Minority Students $123,750
Academic Enrichment Opportunities for AP MPS Teachers/Students $54,410 $28,000
Student Affairs:
PeopleSoft training for enrollment services staff $60,000
Administrative Affairs:
Campus signage program $325,00
Accelerate classroom maintenance program $75,00
CIPD:
Instructional Designer/Media Developer $83,41
TOTAL $6,627,561 $782,200


5. Allocation of the Educational Technology Fee.

The vice chancellor, acting on the recommendations of the Educational Technology Advisory Committee, approved the following projects for 1999-00 funding by the Educational Technology Fee:

Project: I&MT initiatives: Campus Computer Laboratories, Help Desk, On line CBT training, I&MT Discount for short courses, I&MT
Amount: $912,748
Unit: I&MT
Description:
Support and equipment for CCLs and Help Desk, continuation of CBT training courses and discounts for students for I&MT short course program.


Project:
Electronic Reserve and Evening and Saturday Information Literacy Workshops
Amount:$55,000
Unit:
Golda Meir Library
Description:
Expand and continue the Electronic Reserve system. Walk-in and class centered workshops on evenings and Saturdays
Project: Continuation of LIB E159 CCL and Reserve Desk

Amount: $93,660
Unit:
Golda Meir Library
Description:
Maintain overnight CCL and overnight Reserve Desk in Library.
Project: Tutorial Software for Academic Support
Amount:
$2048
Unit:
Tutoring and Academic Resource Center
Description:
Software purchases for Electronic Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, Learning Plus, and Business, Math, Science and Speed-Reading CD-ROMs.
Project:
E-Mail Delivery of Interlibrary Loan Articles
Amount:
$8,100
Unit:
Golda Meir Library
Description:
Purchase software to allow for the electronic receipt and forwarding to students and faculty of electronic versions of interlibrary loan articles.

6. Allocations for The Milwaukee Idea.

A great deal of discussion, thought, and planning over the past year has resulted in the First Ideas - the launching of the Milwaukee Idea, UWM's focus on becoming a premier urban university by integrating its strengths in research, teaching and outreach with partnerships with its communities. The success of these efforts is already evident in the investment by the UW System of seed funds for the Milwaukee Idea. UW-System's commitment provides $750,000 in both 1999-00 and 2000-01. UWM will match these investments, utilizing central funds such as those made available in the COF and through tuition revenues. The UWM Foundation also is committed to a $750,000 match in each of these two years. These investments should be viewed as a bridge funding to bring the campus to the 2001-2003 biennium when it will submit a major budget request.

Summary of 1999-00 Budget Allocations:

The following spreadsheet provides a summary of the major base budget allocations made to unit budgets in 1999-2000, described in the paragraphs above.


SPREADSHEET 1

SPREADSHEET 2

SPREADSHEET 3



C. PLANNING FOR UWM'S FUTURE

The future is bright for UW-Milwaukee! As Section A of this planning document demonstrates, the university is making measurable progress in meeting its broad array of strategic goals and is aware of and preparing to address areas of minimal progress. Enrollments are increasing and are expected to continue to increase. The Milwaukee Idea has brought focus and vision to UWM's future as a premier urban university. And, UWM has begun the important task of planning its resource needs over the next five years, in concert with its strategic plan and the Milwaukee Idea.

Planning for UWM's Future, a long-range plan for financing and supporting UWM's priorities, was launched with a two-day retreat in April, 1999. Participating in the retreat were the Chancellor and Provost, the Chancellor's Cabinet, the Academic Deans Council, the Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee, the Milwaukee Idea staff, and the Vice Chancellor's staff. Prior to the retreat, these 40 individuals prepared a description of potential resources that could be available over the next five years and arguments and rationale for investing in seven areas: The First Ideas; Academic Programs and Enrollments (EM 21); Research; Student Information Systems and Student Services; Milwaukee Commitment; Competitive Salaries; and Contingencies. Each "planning domain" presentation is posted on the Academic Affairs website, as is the complete report of the goals and accomplishments of the retreat. The retreat confirmed that investments in all planning domains are critical, not only because of our need to excel in these areas, but also because most such investments will yield the additional resources necessary to finance - over the long term - investments in strategic goals.

The goals of the retreat, and an update on progress in meeting these goals, are summarized below:

GOAL: To strengthen a sense of community based on a shared vision for UWM's future that is grounded in the UWM Strategic Plan and the Milwaukee Idea.

Our 2-day discussions culminated in a shared recognition that planning for UWM's future as a premier urban research university requires investment of both resources and creative efforts of faculty, staff and students in research, academic programs and modalities of teaching and learning, competitive salaries, diversity, student information system enhancement, and contingent needs. A key budgetary and conceptual component of our institutional long-range planning is the Milwaukee Idea. As stated by Chancellor Zimpher, "Like threads through a cloth, these Milwaukee Ideas will be woven into the fabric of the university and into the way in which we do our work, adding color and luster to our strong tradition of teaching excellence, research and scholarship, service and engagement." Within this broad framework, we agree that:

  • Our research, scholarship, and creative expression are central to our vision, and our position and status as a Research II university must be maintained and enhanced.

  • We will increasingly become engaged with our communities.

  • We will become a destination campus in Southeast Wisconsin.

  • We are committed to serving a diverse population of faculty, staff and students.

  • We must ensure that growth in the quality of teaching, learning and outreach parallels our growth in research, scholarship and creative activity.

  • Infrastructure must be supported by investing in appropriate technologies and support systems.

  • We need to generate revenues to support our mission, recognizing that quality contributes to growth, and purposeful growth contributes to quality.

The following Preamble summarizes the shared vision in Planning for UWM's Future:

In five years, UWM will increase its status as a premier Research II university. The overall organizing principle for UWM programming begins with our identification as a research university, engaged in scholarship across the campus with our basic intellectual and creative capital. Our foundation in scholarship provides the capacity to challenge the student learning community with paradigms of discovery and to engage the surrounding communities (city, state, world) with a robust base of scholarly expertise. The major themes of the Milwaukee Idea will contribute to our growth in research strengths and enable a 14% increase per annum in extramural funding.

As an urban university, we will continue our commitment to student access reflecting the diverse population of the Southeastern Wisconsin community.

Our enrollment will grow with a balance of traditional and nontraditional students utilizing innovative instructional programs that meet the unique needs of our community.

We will accomplish these goals by attracting a diverse, highly qualified faculty and staff with nationally competitive salaries.



GOAL: To develop within the university's leadership community a shared understanding of - and agreement on - the issues that require long-term financial planning, the resources that are available to address these issues, and the tradeoffs that will need to be made.

  • To reach a working consensus on potential sources of funding for resource investment priorities and on the parameters of potential growth of these sources.

We agree that potential sources include anticipated revenue growth from:

  • an aggressive and successful biennial budget request and capital campaign,

  • growth in extramural grants and contracts, and

  • purposeful enrollment increases.

    • As we plan substantial growth across all potential revenue sources, we have in-hand a long-awaited resource of revenues achieved by meeting and exceeding our institutional enrollment targets. We will grow and invest these resources - always for the purpose of enhancing quality, cooperation and collegiality - in enhancing the quality of teaching and learning, supporting scholarship, meeting instructional priorities, encouraging interdisciplinary studies, and supporting infrastructure needs. Deans in units generating these revenues will incorporate these quality investment principles in their utilization of 80% of this tuition revenue resource, while the provost will apply the same quality investment principles to the utilization of 20%.

We need to reexamine the overall structure of UWM in the context of achieving our shared vision and utilizing our resources most effectively. The chancellor has begun this review over the summer of 1999, employing the consulting services of A. T. Kearney.

  • To reach a working consensus on an initial set of priorities for resource investments that are consistent with this shared vision.

We agree that planning for UWM's Future as a premier urban research university requires investment of both resources and creative efforts of faculty, staff and students in all of the following areas:

  • Research, scholarship, and creative activity: Faculty positions, S&E and capital, research infrastructure
  • Academic programs and new modalities of teaching and learning: Faculty and instructional staff positions, seed funds for new modalities to serve new student markets
  • Competitive salaries: Bring faculty, staff, and teaching assistant salaries to levels competitive with peer institutions
  • Diversity: Pre-college programs, faculty and staff positions for diversity hiring, program initiatives
  • Student information system enhancement: PeopleSoft Student Information System
  • Contingent needs: Capital campaign initiation, marketing, loans and grants
  • The Milwaukee Idea: Resources for the development of the First Ideas:
    • Education: Cultures and Communities, International Initiative, Partnerships for Education
    • Economy: Consortium for Economic Opportunity, Technology Center, Knowledge Fest
    • Environment: Partnerships for Environmental Health, Fresh Water Initiatives, Healthy Choices, Campus Design Solutions

We agree that these areas extensively overlap, such that investments in positions, seed funds, programs and infrastructure will serve multiple uses.


  • To develop an initial draft of a long-range (5-year) plan for funding major issues and initiatives that are critical to the achievement of our shared vision.

The planning participants engaged in long-range budget modeling for the purpose of determining overall agreement on areas critical for planned investment and for expected resource growth. The group supports the importance of each area of investment identified for the retreat and agrees conceptually that the relative magnitudes of the ranges of investment suggested by each resource group serve as useful starting places in the formation of a long-range plan. It is important to recognize that a great deal of discussion and analysis needs to occur before finalizing a long-range plan that includes anticipated investments. Such analysis needs to take into account that investment figures coming out of the retreat exceed, collectively, the high range of projected resources - a projection which is built on extremely optimistic assumptions. They also do not take into account the restricted nature of sources against specified planned uses, nor do they factor in the considerable overlap and synergies across all areas of resource investment.

Nonetheless, despite its oversimplifications and likely overstatements, the planning model that emerged from the planning retreat provides an excellent first draft which reflects the priorities of the collective Chancellor's Cabinet, Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee, and the Academic Deans Council.

Our first iteration of a 5-year investment strategy is represented by the graphic on the following page which identifies the relative magnitudes of the areas of investment and the extensive overlap between these areas.


  • To identify the next steps (including issues or initiatives that require additional analysis or planning) that are necessary to complete a first iteration of the long-range plan, to develop an appropriate schedule, and to assign responsibility for completing these steps in a timely manner.

The Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee will continue to advise the provost and chancellor as the long-range planning models are refined. The CBAC is continuing to meet over the summer of 1999 to further refine the sources and planning domains of the short and long-range plan.

The provost will present draft planning strategies for the following tasks as well as others identified for CBAC and campus review no later than Fall, 1999

  • Coordinate planning of Research Plan III, Milwaukee Commitment, EM21, etc, with ongoing Milwaukee Idea planning.
  • Plan the capital campaign
  • Plan for increasing efficiencies
  • Conduct salary analysis and design plan.
  • Formulate plans for hiring and supporting faculty and staff in clusters enhancing the research productivity, program development, and the Milwaukee Idea



[Research, Academic Programs, First Ideas,
Mke Commitment Programs, Salaries, Capital Campaign Marketing &
PeopleSoft]


GOAL: To bring closure to certain elements of financial planning which require immediate decisions, e.g.:


  • To determine the amounts that will be reserved in the FY99-00 budget to begin implementing the long-range plan, including the Milwaukee Idea;

Our hypothetical model suggests a willingness to debt finance the identified areas of investment growth potential in FY 99-00. Known investment sources include $2.5M in existing resources (PAR allocations, COF programs, restricted funds supporting the first year of PeopleSoft implementation). We need to come to closure, after extensive assessment of the long-range models, as to the degree we are willing to debt finance additional 1999-2000 investments against future revenue growth.


  • To arrive at a decision regarding the purchase of the PeopleSoft Student Information System within the time frame offered by the UW System contract;

We agreed to implement PeopleSoft SIS and approved a draft financial strategy; restricted sources of draft financial plan need to be approved within appropriate committees and routes.



  • To lay the foundation for the FY00-1 annual resource planning process.

The annual resource panning process will be in place at the end of August, 1999.



To start planning for a major UWM funding proposal to be included in the 2001-2003 biennial operating budget.



The work of the First Ideas action teams and EM 21 planning over the summer, '99 will provide the framework for the 2001-03 biennial budget request.



IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FUTURE:

Prospects for UWM's future are closely linked to the extensive time, energy and careful thought invested in reviewing our priorities and practices and rethinking our actions. Most notably, The Milwaukee Idea has prompted partnerships and planning activities that have changed our internal processes as large numbers of campus and community representatives have become part of critical discussions. Some of the implications of the Milwaukee Idea include:

A. "Horizontal" approaches to planning major initiatives. The First Ideas involve a number of units across campus and within the Milwaukee community. Their success requires partnerships as well as ownership, and extensive cooperation across units.

B. Greater participation of faculty, staff, students and community partners in planning the future of our campus.

C. Evaluation of the First Ideas and their success in furthering the goals and reputation of the institution, with the continuing expansion of ideas which focus on UWM's unique opportunities as an urban research university.

D. Successful capital campaigns and biennial budget requests built upon the Milwaukee Idea.



The impact of change in leadership has already been clearly evident. Chancellor Nancy Zimpher conceived of the Milwaukee Idea soon after taking the helm at UWM. The chancellor also alerted the campus at that time to her interest in reviewing campus organization and possibly making changes to better serve our strategic goals. A number of events will bring opportunities for review and revision as appropriate:

A. Provost Kenneth Watters announced in the Fall of 1998 that he would retire in June, 2000. The search for provost has been initiated.

B. In line with the search for a provost, the chancellor has initiated a review of upper administration which includes the appropriate role for the next provost. She has engaged the consulting services of A.T. Kearney; a report is anticipated by the end of the summer.

C. The chancellor has also announced that she plans to review the organization of schools and colleges in the Fall, 1999 semester.

D. The Chancellor's Budget Advisory Committee will lead a campus review and evaluation of administrative functions. The primary purpose of this review is to enhance the quality of administrative functions and services; a secondary purpose is to identify opportunities for campus efficiencies.



The campus is also reviewing and revising its budget management strategies. Most notably, short and long-range financial planning has been initiated with the April, 1999 retreat on Planning for UWM's Future. Among other things, the retreat endorsed a campus goal to grow its resources through judicious enrollment growth and efficient utilization of tuition revenues generated by that enrollment growth. Implications of this approach to UWM's future include:

A. Anticipated enrollment growth of 2% to 4% per year for the next five years.

B. Return to deans of 80% of fund 101 tuition revenues generated by schools/college above and beyond the tuition revenue target established by the provost. Deans will utilize these revenue enhancements to their base budgets to support the expanded instructional delivery as well as other purposes which enhance the quality and effectiveness of the unit in meeting the institution's strategic goals.

C. The remaining 20% of fund 101 tuition revenues generated above and beyond the institutional revenue target will be retained at the campus level to support campus-wide priorities, including infrastructure needs.

D. All other instructional program revenue sources - fund 189, fund 136, etc. - will operate in a similar way. That is, 80% of the revenues generated by a unit will be retained by the unit, and 20% will contribute to a campus fund pool for infrastructure and campus-wide priority support.

E. Pricing options will be reviewed, not for the purpose of whole-scale increases in costs to students, but rather to examine specific markets, access, and financial assistance policies that enable UWM to increase access to programs with resources that can support continuing and enhanced quality.