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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017


College of Health Sciences


Kinesiology



Athletic Training

Certified athletic trainers are healthcare professionals who specialize in preventing, recognizing, managing, and rehabilitating injuries in physically active individuals. As part of a complete healthcare team, the certified athletic trainer works under the direction of a licensed physician and in cooperation with other healthcare professionals, athletics administrators, coaches, and parents.

Master of Science in Athletic Training (MS-AT)
To continue our leadership in Athletic Training education, we are revising our program to reflect the changed nature of professional practice demanding more interprofessional collaboration, a higher degree of autonomy requiring advanced development of clinical reasoning skills, and a skill set in evidence-based practice that allows graduates to actively engage in the rapidly changing science surrounding healthcare practice. Therefore, we have established a graduate, professional education program where students would earn a Master of Science in Athletic Training. The program was implemented during the 2015-2016 academic year, with the first students beginning the program for the summer session of 2016. Please refer to the program website for additional information and updates (www.atep.uwm.edu).  

Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training

As of February 1, 2015, the Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training program has suspended admission. This means that unless you have been accepted into this degree program prior to February 1, 2015, you will not be able to earn a bachelor’s degree in Athletic Training at UWM. The following information is provided solely for the benefit of students accepted into the BS - Athletic Training program prior to February 1, 2015. 

Course of Study. The Department of Kinesiology offers a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training as a four-year curriculum. The major consists of one semester of pre-Athletic Training study, and 7 semesters once admitted to the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) leading to the completion of 130 credits and a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training degree. The program is accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education.

Admission. Admission to the University is done by satisfying UWM admission requirements. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training must apply specifically to the ATEP. The application process begins during the fall pre-Athletic Training semester and students are admitted into the ATEP in January. Students must meet the following criteria to be eligible for application to the ATEP:

  1. Cumulative UWM GPA of 2.5 (12 credits minimum);
  2. Enrollment in Introduction to Kinesiology (Kin 200), Field Work in Athletic Training (Kin 212), and Responding to Emergencies (HMS 310) courses; and
  3. Enrollment in Anatomy and Physiology I (Bio Sci 202) (earned grade of C or better prior to admission).

Students who meet the minimum eligibility requirements are invited to apply for admission into the ATEP. Application materials are distributed as part of the Field Work in Athletic Training (Kin 212) class. Admission is competitive, since the ATEP can accommodate approximately 40 students. Selection is based on the following criteria:

  1. Performance evaluations and final grade in Field Work in Athletic Training (HMS 212);
  2. Academic performance;
  3. Interview;
  4. Responsive essay; and
  5. Fulfillment of technical standards.

Detailed information regarding the selection process and technical standards is available in the Office of Student Affairs (NWQ Building B, 6th Floor) and Department of Kinesiology reception area (Enderis 411) or on the ATEP website: www.atep.uwm.edu.

Retention Criteria. Once admitted into the ATEP, the student must attain a minimum semester GPA of 2.75 each semester to remain in good standing. Failure to attain a semester GPA of 2.75 or higher will result in the student being placed on academic probation for one semester. A second semester GPA below 2.75 will result in dismissal from the program. To remain eligible for clinical education coursework, students must attain a grade of B- or better in each of the five competency courses.

Foundation Courses. The following courses must be completed with a grade of C or better prior to beginning the junior year. One-semester appeals may be granted provided the student has a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 and is concurrently enrolled in the course(s) necessary to satisfy the requirement.

  • Math 105 - Intermediate Algebra
  • Psych 101 - Introduction to Psychology
  • Sociol 101 - Introduction to Sociology
  • Bio Sci 202 - Anatomy and Physiology I
  • Bio Sci 203 - Anatomy and Physiology II
  • Chem 100 - Chemical Science
  • Physics 120 - General Physics (Non-calculus)
  • Kin 200 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Kin 270 - Statistics in the Health Professions
  • BMS 232 - Introduction to Nutrition

Internship Eligibility Criteria. To enroll in Kin 489 Kinesiology Internship and Seminar, the student must meet the following criteria:

Athletic Training Core Courses. The student must complete all of the following courses with a minimum GPA of 2.75:

  • Kin 216: Organization and Administration in Athletic Training
  • Kin 312: Introduction to Athletic Training
  • Kin 314: Recognition and Evaluation of Injuries: Lower Extremity
  • Kin 315: Recognition and Evaluation of Injuries: Upper Extremity
  • Kin 316: Recognition and Evaluation of Injuries: Head, Neck, and Trunk
  • Kin 336: Principles of Strength and Conditioning
  • Kin 410: Medical Aspects of Illness Management
  • Kin 413: Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training
  • Kin 414: Therapeutic Exercise and Evaluation in Athletic Training

Kinesiology Core Courses. The student must have a minimum GPA of 2.75 in all of the following courses that have been completed, and have no more than three courses remaining.

  • Kin 320: Biomechanics
  • Kin 325: Anatomical Kinesiology
  • Kin 330: Exercise Physiology
  • Kin 350: Psychological Aspects of Sport and Exercise
  • Kin 351: Sociological Aspects of Health and Human Movement
  • Kin 400: Ethics and Values in the Health and Fitness Professions
  • Kin 460: Motor Development Across the Lifespan
  • Kin 461: Principles of Motor Learning

Students should be aware that the Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (Kin 489) course requires either a full-time (40 hours per week) commitment for 16 weeks, or a 20-hour-per-week commitment over two consecutive semesters. In addition to the criteria listed previously, the student must be in good standing within the ATEP and have approval from the ATEP Director of Clinical Education to begin the internship.

Graduation Requirements. The following requirements must be met to graduate:

  1. Completion of the required 130 degree credits;
  2. Cumulative UWM GPA of 2.5; and
  3. GPA of 2.75 in Human Movement Sciences Core courses.

Kinesiology

Students majoring in kinesiology study the social, behavioral, mechanical, and physiological principles of human movement. Kinesiology students are the future health and fitness providers who use preventative and rehabilitative intervention techniques in commercial health/fitness clubs, community fitness centers, corporate/industrial fitness facilities, and clinical agencies with specialization in cardiac/pulmonary rehabilitation. Those students wishing to go in to these settings require hands-on skills and practice to propel them in their future careers. The Kinesiology major with the Health Promotion track will give these students the skills needed to do so. This track still allows students the flexibility to complete a minor or certificate making it ideal for those with particular interests. For instance, the student could acquire a business minor in preparation for entering the job market at a supervisory/administrative level, which should provide a fast track to management within health and fitness facilities, community fitness centers, and with entrepreneurial ventures.

Many careers in Kinesiology require post baccalaureate and continuing education for practice. The Kinesiology major with the Exercise Science track can be tailored to prepare individuals seeking specialized future careers in the allied health/movement science fields, such as physical therapy, exercise physiology, or chiropractic care, as well as the medical field in areas such as nursing, physician assistant, or traditional medicine.

Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional Organizations. Students should be aware that some professions, occupations, and employers are subject to licensing and/or bonding requirements. When a course of study includes clinical or field training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students may be subjected to a check of criminal conviction records, prior to acceptance of a student by the placement site. Students are responsible for obtaining the information necessary for them to become knowledgeable about these requirements and plan their studies accordingly. Please contact the appropriate department or program office for further information.

Course of Study. The undergraduate program in the Department of Kinesiology is a four-year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology. The program has two tracks, Health Promotion and Exercise Science. Both tracks consist of foundational studies, lab classes, and professional preparation leading to the completion of 120 credits for the Bachelor of Science degree.

Admission and progression criteria (including curricular requirements) for the BS Kinesiology Program are subject to change as of the publication date of this catalog. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs, NWQ Building B, 6th Floor, 414-229-2758, for the most current information.

Eligibility. Students interested in Kinesiology will remain eligible for continuation in the degree by

  1. Completion of the UWM’s General Education Requirements (students are encouraged to use CHS courses when appropriate);
  2. Maintenance of a UWM cumulative grade point average over 2.5;
  3. Completion of the Kinesiology Foundation Courses with a grade of C or better. Students may not repeat more than four (4) of the Kinesiology Foundation Courses:
    • KIN 200: Introduction to Kinesiology
    • KIN 270: Statistics in the Health Professions: Theory and Practice
    • BIO SCI 202: Anatomy & Physiology I
    • BIO SCI 203: Anatomy & Physiology II
    • CHEM 100: Chemical Science
    • COMMUN 103: Public Speaking
    • ENGLISH 207: Health Science Writing
    • NUTR 235: Introduction to Nutrition for the Health Professions
    • PHYSICS 120: General Physics I
    • PSYCH 101: Introduction to Psychology
    • SOCIOL 101: Introduction to Sociology
    • SPT&REC 110-192: Physical Activity Requirement
    • SPT&REC 292-298: Physical Activity Requirement

Admission. In order to move on to the Kinesiology Core courses, the following admission criteria must be met:

  1. 2.5 cumulative GPA;
  2. Minimum grade of C in the following foundations courses:
    • KIN 270: Statistics in the Health Professions: Theory & Practice
    • BIO SCI 202: Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO SCI 203: Anatomy and Physiology II
    • CHEM 100: Chemical Science
    • PHYSICS 120: General Physics I
  3. Completion of UWM’s General Education Requirements; and
  4. Completion of online application for admission to the Kinesiology major;

When the criteria are met and application accepted, the student will be admitted to the Kinesiology program.

NOTE: Admission and progression criteria (including curricular requirements) for the BS Kinesiology Program are subject to change. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs, NWQB 6425, (414) 229-2758, for the most current information.

Retention.  Retention in the program and graduation is dependent upon:

  1. Maintenance of a 2.5 cumulative UWM GPA;
  2. Completion of all courses in one of the following track curriculum with an average GPA of 2.75 in the Kinesiology Core. Students may not repeat more than three (3) of the Kinesiology Core courses.
  3. Completion of all required courses, correlates/internship, and elective credits (120 minimum degree credits).

All students will complete the Kinesiology core requirements:

Kin 300

Professional Preparation Seminar

1

Kin 320

Biomechanics

3

Kin 330

Exercise Physiology

4

Kin 350

Psychological Aspects of Sport and Exercise

3

Kin 351

Sociological Aspects of Health and Human Movement

3

Kin 360

Motor Development Across the Lifespan

3

Kin 361

Principles of Motor Learning

3

Kin 400

Ethics and Values in the Health and Fitness Professions

3

Total

23

 

In addition to the Kinesiology core requirements listed above, students will chose one (1) of the following tracks to follow:

Exercise Science Track

Correlate Coursework Requirements

3 credits Kin 300 – 599

3 credits Kin 500 – 599

12 credits from approved list

Total

18

Total Program Credits

120

Kinesiology Core GPA

2.750

UWM Cumulative GPA

2.500

 

Health Promotion Track

Professional Skill Development Requirements

Kin 301

Field Experiences in Kinesiology I

1

Kin 302

Field Experiences in Kinesiology II

1

Kin 303

Field Experiences in Kinesiology III

1

Kin 325

Anatomical Kinesiology

3

Kin 336

Principles of Strength and Conditioning

3

Kin 430

Exercise Testing for Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription

3

Kin 480

Organization and Administration in the Exercise and Fitness Industry

3

Total

18

Internship and Seminar

Kin 489

Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (480-560 hours)

12

Total Program Credits

120

Kinesiology Core GPA

2.750

UWM Cumulative GPA

2.500

 

Internship Eligibility. The following requirements must be met before enrolling in KIN 489 Kinesiology Internship and Seminar:

  1. Completion of all other curriculum requirements;
  2. A 2.5 or greater cumulative GPA;
  3. A 2.75 or greater cumulative GPA for all Kinesiology Core requirements (KIN 300, 320, 330, 350, 351, 360, 361 and 400);
  4. A C or greater in all Health Promotion track Professional Skill Development requirements;
  5. Verification of 100 hours of post-high school paid or volunteer work experience in the health/fitness field; and
  6. Verification of First Aid/CPR certification.

Students should be aware that the Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (KIN 489) course requires a full-time (34 hours per week) commitment for 16 weeks.

Graduation Requirements. The following requirements must be met to graduate:

  1. Completion of the required 120 degree credits;
  2. Cumulative UWM GPA of 2.5; and
  3. GPA of 2.75 in Kinesiology Core curriculum courses (listed above). 

Students Interested in Physical Therapy

Physical therapy is an integral and unique component of the healthcare system. As a health profession, physical therapy focuses on the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and cardiopulmonary systems of the human body as these systems relate to human motion and function. Human movement and the ability to interact physically with one's environment are essential components of physical, emotional, and social well-being. The physical therapist is dedicated to promoting health, preventing disease, and rehabilitating individuals disabled by injury or disease.

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) requires students pursuing a career in physical therapy to enter the profession with a post-baccalaureate degree.

An undergraduate degree in Kinesiology will prepare students by providing them with the necessary coursework required to enter most physical therapy graduate programs in the country, provided the student meets other admission criteria.

Admission to a DPT program is competitive. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better to be eligible for admission. Completion of UWM's Kinesiology Bachelor of Science degree does not guarantee admission to UWM's DPT program. Also, be aware of the admission requirements for each individual program as they do vary.

Sample Plan for Kinesiology Major Student Interested in Physical Therapy

Sample 4-Year Plan

Minor in Kinesiology
The Minor in Kinesiology affords students opportunities to study the multidisciplinary science of human movement.

Students who complete the Minor in Kinesiology will be able to:

  1. Describe, from a multidisciplinary approach, the value and benefits of all forms of physical activity and a healthy lifestyle; and
  2. Summarize and apply theoretical and scientific knowledge from multiple Kinesiology sub disciplines such as: biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor behavior, sociological and psychological aspects of physical activity, health, and sport.

To declare the Minor in Kinesiology, students must:

  1. Have completed a minimum of 24 credits;
  2. Have a minimum UWM GPA of 2.5; and
  3. Complete the online declaration form.

The Minor in Kinesiology involves completing 18 credits of kinesiology coursework. Students must:

  1. Complete no fewer than 12 credits from the following list (declaration of minor is a prerequisite for each of these courses):
  2. KIN 320: Biomechanics (3 credits)
  3. KIN 330: Exercise Physiology (4 credits)
  4. KIN 350: Psychological Aspects of Sport and Exercise (3 credits)
  5. KIN 351: Sociological Aspects of Health and Human Movement (3 credits)
  6. KIN 460: Motor Development Across the Lifespan (3 credits)
  7. KIN 461: Principles of Motor Learning (3 credits)
  8. Complete 6 additional Kinesiology credits level 300 or above.

To be awarded the Minor in Kinesiology, students will need to earn a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the 18 credits in the Kinesiology minor. Students must satisfy published prerequisites of any course.

Academic advisors within the College of Health Science Office of Student Affairs will assist students enrolled in the program with the development of career goals and the selection of appropriate courses to further those goals. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs at 414-229-2758.

Certificate Programs

Healthy Aging

The Undergraduate Certificate in Healthy Aging is an interdisciplinary program housed in the Center for Aging and Translational Research. The primary goals of the certificate are:

  1. To acquire basic foundational knowledge in the processes of aging, issues regarding aging, and the challenges of older adulthood. 
  2. To understand the interdisciplinary and integrative nature of gerontology.
  3. To have practical experiences with older adults.

The certificate is open to all undergraduate students as well as non-degree seeking students. Undergraduate students may earn the certificate in conjunction with any major. Non-degree students may choose to complete the program to enhance their job performance or increase their marketability in the field of aging. Certificate completion will be posted on a student’s official transcript and an official paper certificate will be sent to the student. 

The program consists of 18 credits including:

  1. Core Curriculum Courses (9 credits): 
    • SOC WRK 300: Aged to Perfection: An Introduction to the Study of Aging (3 credits)
    • Six credits from core curriculum courses in the following areas: biological, psychological, or social dimensions of aging. No more than three credits can be taken in one area. See the program coordinator for a current list.
  2. Elective (6 credits): Students select aging-related courses after consulting with the academic advisor for their program and the certificate coordinator. A maximum of 3 credits of approved independent study may be counted as an elective. 
  3. Practicum, Field Placement, Internship, or Service Learning (3 credits): Three credits must be in a practicum, field placement, internship or service learning course working primarily with older adults or caregivers. 

The student must maintain a 2.5 GPA for the 18 credits that meet certificate requirements. 

For additional information, contact the program coordinator in the Center for Aging and Translational Research, catr@uwm.edu, (414) 229-7313.

Strength and Conditioning

The Strength and Conditioning Certificate Program is designed to prepare students for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist exam. In addition, this program provides the basic knowledge for individuals to succeed on the NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer examination and the American Council on Exercise's Certified Personal Trainer examination.

The Strength and Conditioning Program incorporates the basic movement science curriculum with a number of courses that focus on 1) the application of fundamental principles of exercise and strength training, and 2) preparation for nationally recognized certification exams (i.e., American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer, National Strength and Conditioning Association's Personal Trainer, and Strength and Conditioning Specialist). The program may be taken by UWM undergraduates concurrently with their chosen major.

Course Requirements

 
Credits

Kin 230

Health Aspects of Exercise and Nutrition

3

Kin 320

Biomechanics

3

Kin 330

Exercise Physiology

4

Kin 336

Principles in Strength and Conditioning I

3

Kin 430

Exercise Testing and Prescription

3

Kin 480

Organization and Administration in the Exercise and Fitness Industry

3

Kin 481

Program Development and Evaluation in Exercise and Fitness

3

 

Total

22


NOTE
: Program requirements subject to change. Contact the Student Services Office, NWQB 6th Floor, for the most current requirements. Completion of this academic program alone does not afford credentials as a "Certified Strength Specialist." Individuals must pass a national certification exam.

Forms for declaring an intention to complete the Strength and Conditioning Certificate are available in the Office of Student Affairs, NWQ Building B, 6th Floor.

Kinesiology Contact: Dr. Christy Greenleaf, Professor, Undergraduate Program Director, Enderis Hall, Room 419, (414) 229-5341, cgreenl@uwm.edu.

Study of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (Available Online)

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM; integrative healthcare) is an important component of the American healthcare system and supports a focus on health and wellness. The CAM modalities advocate for care that is patient-centered, healing oriented, emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, and uses therapeutic approaches originating from conventional and alternative medicine. Health and wellness, mind and body, and natural products are key areas of focus within this area of study. Healthcare professionals and future healthcare professionals, wellness and fitness oriented professionals and students, and interested individuals benefit from competency in understanding and critically evaluating the various practices considered as complementary and alternative or integrative.

The focus of this certificate program is an educational foundation regarding the broad use of complementary and integrative practices. Through coursework, learners explore and evaluate the most common forms of CAM, the history and cultural applications of CAM practices, evidence-based and ethical use of CAM, and the critical evaluation of CAM information and research. Completion provides basic scientific knowledge and skills to critically evaluate the current and future use of integrative healthcare.

NOTE:

Students must declare their intent to pursue this academic certificate. Professional advisors provide information and guidance to help students make informed educational decisions. Students are encouraged to meet with an advisor at least once each semester. To schedule an advising appointment, call the Office of Student Affairs appointment line at (414) 229-2758.

Course Requirements

Required Courses (12 Credits)

Offered

Credits

BMS 260*

Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine

F/S

3

Kin 365*

Mind-Body Integration and Interventions in Complementary Medicine

S

3

Kin 368*

Complementary Self-Help Strategies and Therapies in Rehabilitation

F

3

Kin 400*

Ethics and Values in the Health and Fitness Professions

F/S

3

Elective Courses (3 Credits)

Offered

Credits

General Focus

BMS 245*

Client Diversity in Health Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

S

3

Commun 381*

Health Communication

F/S

3

Philos 244*

Ethical Issues in Healthcare

F/S

3

Psych 254

Physiological Psychology

F/S

3

Sociol 331

Sociology of Healthcare

F/S

3

Health and Wellness Focus

BMS 232*

Introduction to Nutrition

F/S

3

Kin 241*

Why We Eat What We Eat

Varies

3

Kin 556

Multilevel Approaches to Changing Physical Activity and Eating Behaviors

S

3

Nutr 235

Introduction to Nutrition for Health Professionals

F

3

Nutr 245

Lifecycle Nutrition

S

3

Nutr 355

Modifying Nutrition and Eating Behavior

F

3

Active Learning (Experience) Focus

Spt&Rec 296

Energy Vinyasa Yoga

F/S

1

Spt&Rec 298

Mind Body Awareness

F/S

2

Spt&Rec 298

Meditation with a Touch of Yoga

F/S

2

Spt&Rec 298

Running with the Mind of Meditation

F

2

Spt&Rec 298

The Art of Healing: Introduction to Self-Care Practices

Varies

1

Spt&Rec 298

Wellness: Conscious Living

F

2


Asterisk (*) denotes online offering available. Course offerings are subject to change.
To earn the academic certificate, a minimum GPA of 2.5 is required in the 15 credits.



Courses

Kinesiology


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