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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014


College of Letters and Science


LETTERS AND SCIENCE

Office of L&S Student Academic Services
Holton Hall 142
(414) 229-4654
lsadvising@uwm.edu

http://www.uwm.edu/letsci/


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DEGREE PROGRAMS

Bachelor of Arts: Actuarial Science; Africology; Anthropology; Art History and Criticism; Biochemistry; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Chinese (CIM); Classics; Committee Interdisciplinary; Communication; Comparative Literature; Conservation and Environmental Science; Economics; English; Film Studies; French; Geography; Geosciences; German; Global Studies; History; International Studies; Italian; Japanese (CIM); Jewish Studies; Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies; Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies; Linguistics; Mathematics; Microbiology; Philosophy; Physics; Political Science; Psychology; Religious Studies; Russian; Sociology; Spanish; Urban Studies (CIM); Women's Studies

Bachelor of Science: Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Atmospheric Sciences, Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Committee Interdisciplinary, Conservation and Environmental Science, Course in Chemistry, Geography, Geosciences (Geology-Geophysics Option only), Mathematics, Medical Science (for early admits to medical school only), Microbiology, Physics

Master of Arts: Art History; Communication; Economics; English; Geography; History; Language, Literature, and Translation; Linguistics; Media Studies; Philosophy; Political Science; Sociology; Women's Studies

Master of Science: Anthropology, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Geography, Geosciences, Mathematics, Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Physics, Psychology, Urban Studies

Master of Human Resources and Labor Relations

Master of Public Administration

Master of Liberal Studies

Doctor of Philosophy: Africology, Anthropology, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Communication, Economics, English, Geography, Geosciences, History, Linguistics, Mathematics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Urban Studies

Administration

Rodney Swain
Dean

Karen Brucks
Associate Dean, Natural Sciences

James Moyer
Associate Dean, Social Sciences

Jennifer Watson
Associate Dean, Humanities and Communication

Deanna Ding
Assistant Dean, College Relations, Marketing, Communication, PR

Chuck Schumacher
Assistant Dean, Administrative Affairs and Personnel

Connie Jo
Assistant Dean, Curriculum, Governance, and Assessment

Patricia Kissinger
Assistant Dean, Unit Business Representative

Cindy Piercy
Interim Assistant Dean, Student Academic Services

Sherry Kulhanek
Assistant to the Dean, Data Management

Diane Amour
Coordinator, American Indian Student Services

Dao Vang
Coordinator, Southeast Asian Student Academic
Services

Susan Fields
Coordinator, African American Student Academic Services

The College of Letters and Science is the largest academic unit of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Nearly every student at UWM completes a significant amount of course work in the College prior to graduation.

Study of the liberal arts and sciences in the College encourages students to develop critical and open minds and provides them with an intellectual foundation in the basic areas of knowledge. Students acquire a broad range of essential skills including the ability to communicate effectively, approach problems analytically, and adapt to new and changing situations.

Admission

Students who meet the standard University admission requirements are admissible to the College of Letters and Science. The same criteria for acceptance are applied to in-state and out-of-state students. See Admission section.

Advising

The College of Letters and Science provides academic advising for all students pursuing a degree in the College, undecided majors, and any students seeking information concerning majors, minors, and courses in the College. Letters and Science offers specialized advising services to any UWM student interested in the areas of pre-law, pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-chiropractic medicine, pre-optometry, pre-podiatry, pre-physician assistant, pre-pharmacy, and pre-veterinary medicine. Upon admission, students are assigned an advisor in the College advising office. Academic advising is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Evening advising is available during registration periods and at other times by appointment. The advising office is located on the first floor of Holton Hall, phone 229-4654.

When students declare a major, they are assigned an additional advisor within the major department. Prior to the assignment of a specific major advisor within the discipline, students may obtain major advising from the department’s undergraduate advising coordinator. All students should consult their academic advisors in Holton Hall and in their department prior to each registration period.

Declaration of Pre-major. Students who are not yet eligible to declare a major formally may declare a pre-major in an academic discipline of interest to them. The declaration of a pre-major is encouraged as soon as a student finds s/he is interested in a particular area. This action permits the department to identify students to whom to send information concerning programs, awards, opportunities (e.g. internships), and other matters relating to the area of study. Students may declare a pre-major by completing a brief form available from the L&S Advising Office (HLT 142) or from the department office.

Course of Study - Bachelor of Arts Degree

(For all new freshmen beginning Fall, 2008; students who entered prior to that date may follow requirements in the 2006-07 Undergraduate Catalog.)

In addition to the requirements listed below, L&S students must complete the University-wide GERs. (http://www4.uwm.edu/current_students/ger_information/index.cfm)

I. ENGLISH WRITING REQUIREMENT

Students must satisfy the English Writing Requirement by completing English 102 with a grade of C or higher or by placing beyond English 102 on the English Placement Test (EPT).

II. MATHEMATICS AND FORMAL REASONING REQUIREMENT

To satisfy the Mathematics and Formal Reasoning Requirement, students must satisfy the following two requirements:

A. achieve a math placement code of at least 30 or earn at least 3 credits with a grade of C or higher in Math 103 (106), 105, 175, or an equivalent course;

B. complete one course (at least 3 credits) at the 200 level or above chosen from courses in mathematics, Philos 211 (Elementary Logic), or Letters and Science statistics courses. For a list of approved statistics courses, see the College of Letters and Science website: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/statistics.cfm.

III. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

Students may satisfy the language requirement in one of two ways: (1) successful completion of the fourth semester of college work or equivalent in one language other than English or (2) successful completion of the third semester of college work or equivalent in one language other than English PLUS the second semester of college work or equivalent in another language other than English. Contact your academic advisor or the L&S Advising Office for an explanation of equivalent work.

IV. INTERNATIONAL REQUIREMENT

Students must satisfy the International Requirement by 1) completing three courses (at least 9 credits) in a single foreign language (not including literature-in-translation) at the 200 level and above, or 2) completing three non-language courses (at least 9 credits) with international content chosen from at least two curricular areas, or 3) completing 9 credits in combination from options 1 and 2. For a list of approved courses, see the College of Letters and Science website: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/international.cfm.

V. BREADTH REQUIREMENT

L&S Breadth Areas

Credits

Humanities

12

Social Sciences

12

Natural Sciences (must include at least one laboratory or field course)

12

No more than 6 credits from a single curricular area may be used to satisfy any single area of the Breadth Requirement. For a list of approved courses, see the College of Letters and Science website: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/upload/breadth.pdf.

VI. THE MAJOR

After completing 15 credits and before 75 credits have been earned, students must declare a major by contacting the appropriate academic department or program. Failure to declare the major before 75 credits have been earned may result in a delay of graduation. Some departments or programs specify course and/or GPA requirements that students must satisfy prior to declaring the major.

The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA in all credits in the major attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all major credits attempted, including any transfer work. Individual departments or programs may require higher GPAs for graduation. Some departmental majors require courses from other departments. Contact your major department for information on whether those credits will count as part of the major GPA. The College requires that students must complete in residence at least 15 credits in upper-division (numbered 300 or above) courses in their major.

Research Requirement. Within their majors, students must complete a research experience approved by the L&S Faculty.

To complete a major, students must satisfy all the requirements of the major as stated in the department or program entry later in this catalog. Students who declare their majors within five years of entering the UW System as a degree candidate may satisfy the requirements outlined in any catalog from the time they entered. Credits used to satisfy the major also may be used to satisfy other degree requirements.

MAJOR OPTIONS
Students may declare a departmental major, an interdepartmental major, or a committee interdisciplinary major.

Departmental Major. A departmental major ordinarily offers one of three orientations: 1) general concentration in the discipline, 2) preparation for graduate work in the discipline, or 3) pre-professional training. Students should select one of these orientations in consultation with their major advisor.

Interdepartmental Major. For the requirements of the seven interdepartmental majors offered, see the Interdepartmental Majors section later in this catalog.

Committee Interdisciplinary Major. The purpose of the committee interdisciplinary major (CIM) is to accommodate Letters and Science students whose academic or career goals extend beyond the standard major structure.

The committee interdisciplinary major requires a minimum of 30 credits, of which at least 15 must be in upper-division (numbered 300 or above) Letters and Science courses taken in residence at UWM. The CIM must include course work in at least two L & S departments. Courses from most units outside the College also may be identified as part of the major. However, at least 18 credits in the major must be earned in Letters and Science courses. Non-L&S courses selected as part of a CIM will not count toward the 90 L&S credits required for the degree, but they will satisfy part of the 30 elective credits available to L&S students.

To propose a committee interdisciplinary major, students should obtain a “Declaration of Committee Interdisciplinary Major” form from the Office of Student Academic Services. They must prepare a written statement defining the goals of their proposed major, and then identify three faculty members from two or more departments who are willing to function as the major oversight committee. At least two faculty members must be from L&S, and one of these persons serves as committee chair and major advisor. The student and committee members together identify the courses that will be required for the major. The declaration form is completed and signed by the committee chair and then sent for approval to the chair of every department in which courses in the major will be taken.

Students present the completed declaration form to the Office of Student Academic Services at any time between the 15th and 75th credits. An academic advisor, in consultation with the interim assistant dean for Student Academic Services, will either approve or deny the proposal. Should the proposal be denied, the student and the committee chair will receive a written explanation of the denial. Students may appeal a denial to the L&S Academic Policies and Curriculum Committee. The proposal also may be reworked and resubmitted.

Second Major. With the approval of the interim assistant dean for Student Academic Services, students may elect a second major.

VII. THE MINOR

The completion of a minor is optional. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA in all credits in the minor attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor credits attempted, including any transfer work. Individual departments may require higher GPAs for graduation. Students must complete in residence at least 9 credits of upper-division (numbered 300 or above) courses in the minor.

VIII. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS AND LIMITATIONS

To complete the B.A., 120 degree credits are required, including at least 36 credits in upper-division (numbered 300 or above) courses offered by the College of Letters and Science. At least 90 credits must be completed in L&S courses, allowing students to take as electives up to 30 credits in courses offered by other UWM academic units. There is no limit to the number of credits that may be taken in one department. No more than 6 credits in any single course outside the College may be counted toward the B.A. (or B.S.) degree. A maximum of 6 credits in military science courses may be counted toward the degree as non-L&S electives. No more than 6 credits of field experience taken outside the College and no more than 6 credits in sport and recreation courses may be counted toward the degree. No “life experience” credits may be counted toward the degree.

Course of Study-Bachelor of Science Degree

(For all new freshmen beginning Fall, 2006; students who entered prior to that date may follow requirements in the 2005-06 Undergraduate Catalog.).

In addition to the requirements listed below, L&S students must complete the University-wide GERs (http://www4.uwm/edu/current_students/ger_information/index.cfm)

Students seeking the BS degree are urged to begin their math and science studies in the earliest possible semester to avoid delays in graduation.

I. ENGLISH WRITING REQUIREMENT

See Bachelor of Arts Degree.

II. MATHEMATICS AND FORMAL REASONING REQUIREMENT

All candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete Math 211, 221, 226, 227, 228, or 231 and one additional course at the 200 level or above chosen from courses in mathematics, Philos 212 (Modern Deductive Logic), or Letters and Science statistics courses. For a list of approved statistics courses, see the College of Letters and Science website: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/statistics.cfm.

III. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

Two courses (minimum 6 credits) in a language (including American Sign Language) other than English at the 100 level or above are required. This requirement is satisfied by two years of a single language (including American Sign Language) other than English taken in high school.

IV. INTERNATIONAL REQUIREMENT

See Bachelor of Arts Degree.

V. BREADTH REQUIREMENT

L&S Breadth Areas

Humanities

12

Social Sciences

12

Natural Sciences (must include laboratory courses from three different curricular areas)

12

No more than 6 credits from a single curricular area may be used to satisfy any single area of the Breadth Requirement. For a list of approved courses, see the College of Letters and Science website: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/upload/breadth.pdf.

VI. THE MAJOR

Requirements are the same as for the Bachelor of Arts degree, with the exception that students must declare a science major. The science major may be one of three kinds: a departmental major from among atmospheric sciences, biological sciences, biochemistry, chemistry, geography, geosciences (geology-geophysics option only), mathematical sciences, microbiology, and physics; the conservation and environmental sciences major; or a committee interdisciplinary major. (See Bachelor of Arts Degree for the last option.) The courses for the committee interdisciplinary major must be selected from the departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Geography (physical), Geosciences, Mathematical Sciences, and Physics or from other courses approved to meet the natural science requirement (http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/natsci.cfm).

Second Major. With the approval of the interim assistant dean for Student Academic Services, students may elect a second major. The second major need not be selected from the natural sciences.

VII. THE MINOR

The completion of a minor is optional. Requirements are the same as for the Bachelor of Arts degree. The minor need not be selected from the natural sciences.

VIII. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

To complete the B.S., 120 degree credits are required, including at least 36 credits in upper-division courses (numbered 300 or above) offered by the College of Letters and Science. For the Bachelor of Science degree, at least 30 of these 36 credits must be from natural science curricular areas or other courses approved as advanced natural sciences (http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/requirements/2006/natsci.cfm).

See Bachelor of Arts Degree for additional credit requirements and limitations.

Eligibility for Prior Degree Requirements. Students enrolled at UWM prior to September, 2006 and transfer students who began their studies prior to September, 2006 may meet the requirements listed above or may satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts/Science degree programs outlined in the Undergraduate Bulletin or Catalog between 1998-99 and 2005-06.

Course of Study - Second Baccalaureate Degree

Candidates for a second baccalaureate degree must satisfy all current requirements for an undergraduate degree in the College of Letters and Science. Transfer work may be used for these requirements. In addition, students must complete at least 30 credits in residence at UWM after the date on which the first degree is awarded. If more than 30 credits are needed to complete all degree requirements, the last 30 credits must be completed in residence. Of these 30 credits, at least 24 must be in courses in the College of Letters and Science. At least 20 of these credits must be in upper-division courses. Students must satisfy current requirements for a major. Students who have been awarded a Bachelor of Arts by the College of Letters and Science are not eligible for a second BA degree from L&S. Those who have earned a Bachelor of Science in L&S are not eligible for a second L&S BS degree.

Course of Study - Additional Majors Program

All College of Letters and Science departments participate in the University’s Additional Majors Program. This program serves students who have completed a degree, either at UWM or elsewhere, as well as those currently enrolled in another school/college at UWM who wish to complete an additional major in L&S. Students who opt for an additional major must complete only the major requirements; they are not required to complete an entire second degree. A regular departmental major, an interdepartmental major, or a committee interdisciplinary major may be selected.

All credit and grade point average requirements currently in effect for the selected major are enforced. This means that students must complete a minimum of 15 advanced credits (numbered 300 or above) in residence at UWM, and they must complete the version of the major in effect at the time of declaration. Students participating in the program must provide transcripts of all prior non-UWM work. Those with a prior degree are admitted with senior standing. Completion of the major is certified by the major department and recorded on an official UWM transcript.

Residence Requirements

In order to provide maximum flexibility while preserving the institutional identity of a UWM degree, the College requires residence (a) during the last 30 credits, (b) during 45 of the last 60 credits, or (c) during any 90 credits of a student’s undergraduate career.

Students who transfer to UWM from a UW two-year college, Milwaukee or Madison Area Technical College, or Nicolet Technical College may transfer up to 72 credits taken at a two-year school.

Students who transfer to UWM from a junior college outside Wisconsin must earn the final 48 credits here or in another bachelor’s-degree-granting college or university in accord with the requirements stated above.

At least 15 credits of advanced work in the major, and 9 credits of advanced work in the minor (if applicable), must be completed in residence at UWM. Departures from this rule due to extraordinary circumstances require a recommendation, including evidence of equivalent work completed elsewhere, from the major or minor department to the Office of Student Academic Services.

Credits earned through credit-by-examination, retroactive credit in foreign languages, and the College Level Examination Program do not interrupt residency.

Grade Point Average

To be eligible for a bachelor’s degree, students must attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 on all credits that count toward a degree in the College, including any transfer work. In addition, students must earn a cumulative 2.0 GPA on all UWM credits that count toward the degree.

Semester Course Load

Students in Letters and Science may carry a maximum of 18 credits in a regular semester. In extraordinary circumstances, an overload may be granted to a student with a high GPA who has no outstanding incompletes. Students should contact the College's advising office for instructions on requesting an overload. Additional fees are assessed for credits beyond 18.

Academic Regulations

For information on actions on unsatisfactory grades and honors for scholarship, see Academic Information.

Special Opportunities

ATTAINMENT EXAMINATIONS

Students may take an attainment examination in some departments to demonstrate mastery of the subject matter of courses that are prerequisite for advanced courses or are required for graduation. Although passing such an examination does not grant credits toward graduation, it enables students to move more quickly to advanced work in a subject area.

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION STUDY

With the permission of the interim assistant dean for Student Academic Services, students may take correspondence courses through the University of Wisconsin-Extension for credit while enrolled in the College of Letters and Science. The total number of credits per semester may not exceed 18, including correspondence courses and work in residence.

CREDIT FOR DEMONSTRATED EQUIVALENT PREPARATION

In special cases, a department may grant credits toward graduation for knowledge or abilities attained through previous work, i.e., course work or other systematic study as determined by the department. Although the College of Letters and Science places no limit on the number of credits that may be obtained in this way, departments, if they choose to do so, may set limits on the number of credits they will grant.

Departments other than foreign language departments may grant a student credits toward graduation for a University course in which s/he requests and passes a special University examination. An examination for credit must be based on work equivalent to a course given at UWM, and the credits granted will be for the corresponding course. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department. Permission for such examinations must be secured in advance from the Dean of the College upon recommendation of the department chair. Examinations for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department. In general, a student may not take such an examination if any previous enrollment in the target course appears on the student's record, whether or not the course was completed.

Foreign language departments may allow students to receive credit for some prerequisite language courses at the 100 and 200 level upon completion of specified higher-level "entry" courses. A student who skips a course or courses in the 100-200 language sequence after having taken a lower-level course may earn credits for demonstrated equivalent preparation ("retro" credits) in the skipped course(s) if s/he earns a grade of B or better in the higher-level course. As a general policy, a grade of B or above is required, but individual departments may set a higher grade requirement. Only the grade in the completed course is computed into the grade point average. A student who earns below the required grade in this entry course becomes, thereafter, ineligible for "retro" credits in the language involved.

The number of credits that can be earned in this way is limited to a maximum of 16 in any one language. Credits granted for prerequisite courses will be equal to the credit value of the prerequisite course(s) or a maximum of 4 credits for each prerequisite course, whichever is the smaller number. Students may not be granted "retro" credits for courses at the 300 level and above.

In the foreign languages, credit for prerequisite courses ("retro credits) also may be granted to transfer students under the following circumstances:

• Retro credits granted by another institution will be accepted at UWM if they were granted based on a course that generates retro credits at UWM and if the student has earned the grade that is required at UWM.

• A transfer student coming from an institution that does not grant retro credits but who took a foreign language course that transfers as a qualifying course at UWM may apply for retro credits if the student satisfies UWM standards for receiving retro credits.

In both cases, the number of retro credits awarded will be limited to the number of credits students at UWM are granted for each prerequisite course.

Students who want more information should contact the chair of the appropriate language department.

EVENING DEGREE OPPORTUNITIES

The College of Letters and Science seeks to accommodate the needs and interests of students who plan to complete degree programs during the evening hours. At present, six degree programs offered by departments in the College can be completed through evening course work. With the approval of the major department and the interim assistant dean for Student Academic Services, modifications often can be made in degree programs that cannot be completed in this manner. Questions concerning the availability of courses and specific degree programs during late hours should be directed either to Lenore Hoeft, 229-5899, or to the appropriate department.

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR PROGRAM

The First-Year Seminar Program affords freshmen the opportunity to participate in a small learning community during their first year at UWM, helping to ease the transition to college. The Program offers a range of seminars to students of all ability levels.

Limited to just 20 first-year students, each first-year seminar provides a unique opportunity for students to get to know their professors and fellow students. In this small seminar setting, the professor serves as a mentor, coaching and helping students to achieve success in their first year. First-year seminars emphasize the development of collaboration, teamwork, written and oral communication skills, creative and analytical thinking, and university literacy.

Seminars are offered in a wide variety of interest areas. Course titles in recent semesters have included What is Randomness; Urban Legends of the Supernatural; Aspects of Hell; and What’s So Funny? Most first-year seminars are offered for three credits and can be applied to degree requirements. See the Schedule of Classes for a list of first-year seminars taught in the current semester.

For more information, visit the First-Year Seminar website at http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/freshmanseminars or call Associate Dean Jennifer Watson at 414-229-4924.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Certain departments allow qualified students to register for independent study. Credits are awarded for academic activities pursued outside the formal classroom setting under the supervision of a member of the Letters and Science faculty or instructional academic staff. The activities may include reading, research, or special projects. In most departments, independent study is offered at the lower and upper levels, although both levels are not available in all departments.

Students register in course numbers 199 or 699 in an appropriate department (290 in Bio Sci or 399 in Sociol) after preparing, with the approval of the supervising instructor, a statement (study proposal) describing the plan of study. The study proposal must be approved by the department chair and forwarded to the Office of Student Academic Services.

In order to apply for lower-level independent study, students must have a 2.5 GPA or above on all credits attempted at UWM. The upper-level independent study course carries a prerequisite of junior standing and a 2.5 UWM GPA. Departments may opt to set higher GPA prerequisites. To ascertain class standing and cumulative GPA for new transfer, special, and summer-only students, a transcript of all previous college work must be submitted. Some independent study courses may have departmental prerequisites in addition to these college-wide prerequisites. Departments do not have the authority to waive college-wide prerequisites. See the course listings later in this catalog to determine if a particular department offers independent study.

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

The Washington Center Internship. The College of Letters and Science participates in a program that arranges internships in Washington, D.C. Students earn 15 UWM credits in the fall or spring semester and 12 credits during the summer semester. The internships are full-time, nonpaid positions. For more information on this opportunity, contact Lenore Fuller, Office of Student Academic Services, Holton 148, (414) 229-5899.

International Internships. A limited number of overseas internship opportunities are available to students accepted to some of the overseas study programs sponsored by the College. For more information on internships abroad, contact the Center for International Education, (414) 229-5182.

Local and Regional Internships. Internships are available in a variety of public and private agencies in the Milwaukee metropolitan area. For more information on internship opportunities, contact Cindy Piercy, Office of Student Academic Services, Holton 118, (414) 229-5872.

OVERSEAS STUDY OPPORTUNITIES

The College of Letters and Science, through the Center for International Education, offers a wide range of opportunities for students to study overseas through a variety of exchange and study abroad programs. Foreign language proficiency is required for some of the programs but is not required for all. Students accepted for participation earn UWM credits and make progress in their major and/or toward their degree at UWM. There also are numerous faculty-led, short-term UWinteriM or summer programs of two- to four-weeks duration in which students may earn three to six credits. Program locations change from year to year and have included Taiwan, Cuba, Ghana, Italy, Peru, India, United Kingdom, China, Brazil, Costa Rica, and France. For certain programs, students may apply for national, regional, or program-specific scholarships.

The programs listed below are sponsored by the College of Letters and Science through the Center for International Education. For additional program information, see the International Study entry in the Academic Opportunities section of this catalog.

Australia and New Zealand: Students may earn UWM credit and receive a small program fee reduction by studying in a wide variety of disciplines at five Australian or two New Zealand universities sponsored by UWM through our affiliation with Australearn.

Canada: Université de Montreal Exchange. Students may study at the Université de Montreal in Quebec Province for the fall or spring semester or for an academic year. French language and literature courses, as well as a wide variety of liberal arts courses, are offered.

Chile: Pontificia Universidad Católica Study Abroad. Located in Santiago, Chile, this fall or spring semester or academic year program offers participants the opportunity to study a wide variety of courses from many disciplines, including liberal arts and Spanish language courses, at the prestigious Catholic University.

China: China Studies Institute Study Abroad. Study in Beijing at this Chinese language and culture unit within Peking University. Non-language courses are taught in English in a broad range of disciplines. Field studies and internships are available.

Egypt: American University in Cairo Study Abroad. Study in this American-style university in the city center of Cairo. For students of all majors with an interest in Arabic studies and languages.

Egypt: AMIDEAST Cairo Study Abroad. AMIDEAST partners with the Arab Academy for this program. Students can choose from a Middle East Studies Track and an Egyptology Track. In both, students take Arabic language and relevant subject-area courses. Internships are available.

Egypt: Cairo University Exchange. Located in the Giza area of greater Cairo; courses available in mass communication, radio and TV, journalism, information studies, public relations, and advertising.

England: London Study Program. Located in central London, this spring semester study abroad program offers a liberal arts curriculum with guest lecturers, regional excursions, internships, and cultural events.

England: British Universities Exchange Programs. Selected students enroll in spring semester or academic year courses at the University of Birmingham, University of Sheffield, University of Sunderland, or University of Kent at Canterbury. Students may take a wide variety of courses in many different disciplines.

England: Herstmonceux Castle Study Abroad. Located in East Sussex about one hour south of London, students can study liberal arts and business for a fall, spring, or summer term in this renovated 15th-century castle. Scholarships, regional excursions, and social events are highlights of this program.

France: Paris Semester Study Abroad. This is a spring semester program with course offerings in French language and literature, art, history, geography, and politics at the Institut de Langue et de Culture Françaises of the Institut Catholique in Paris as well as a credit internship teaching in French schools and the opportunity to take a business class at a French business school. The program includes tours and visits to places of historical and cultural interest.

France: Université de Paris IX-Dauphine Exchange. This exchange offers a mixture of courses in French and English, with a good selection of business, literature, and history courses.

France: Sciences Politiques Exchange. This is an academic year exchange for advanced French speakers with strong social science backgrounds (political science, international studies, history), which is offered at one of the most prestigious higher education institutions in France. Many French presidents and diplomats have graduated from this school, located in Paris.

France: Advanced Negocia Exchange. A spring semester offering at Advanced Negocia in Paris, this program focuses on business and marketing, with course work taught in English. A wider variety of courses are available for advanced French speakers.

France: MICEFA Exchange. An academic year or spring semester program coordinated by the Mission interuniversitaire de coordination des echanges franco-americaines (MICEFA) in Paris, this immersion program is for advanced French speakers who are placed at one of ten different Parisian universities for study of a wide variety of subjects.

France: ESA Exchange. Enroll in Architecture and Urban Planning course offerings in French at the Ecole Speciale d’Architecture (ESA) in Paris.

Germany: Giessen Exchange. This is a spring semester or academic year program in which qualified UWM students enroll at Justus Liebig Universität in Giessen, Germany. Participation in the exchange fulfills a large portion of credits needed for a German Studies Certificate. Several scholarships are available for this program.

Germany: Hessen-Wisconsin Exchange. This is a unique program, managed by UWM, for students of the University of Wisconsin System. The exchange can be for a semester, year, or summer session at any one of the 13 participating Hessian universities. Immersion courses, language learning at all levels, and some courses in English are offered.

Germany/Poland: European University Viadrina Exchange. This is a fall and spring semester or academic year program located on the border between Germany and Poland. Students can pursue law, economics, and cultural studies in German, Polish, or English languages.

Northern Ireland: Colmcille Study Abroad. This unique spring semester study program starts in Dublin and moves to Gleanncolmcille (both in the Irish Republic) for Irish language and culture training; then the program continues in Derry, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) for studies in peace and conflict resolution at the Magee College of the University of Ulster.

Israel: Rothberg International School - Hebrew University of Jerusalem Study Abroad Program. Students have the opportunity to study in English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in a wide variety of subjects, such as religious, Israeli, and Middle Eastern studies; business; psychology; environmental studies; dance and music. Students also develop a proficiency in Hebrew and participate in a comprehensive program of extracurricular activities including tours in Jerusalem and throughout the country.

Israel: Ginsburg Ingerman Overseas Student Program at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Students will study Hebrew language in addition to choosing from a variety of courses taught in English that are designed to enhance and connect their experience in Israel. Students will be encouraged to participate in volunteer service to deepen their knowledge of and exposure to Israel and its people.

Italy: Cortona Study Abroad. Sponsored by the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia, several art and art history courses are offered during this summer or semester-long study abroad program. Students will participate in course-related and weekend field trips as well as cultural activities with the local community.

Japan: Chiba University Exchange. This exchange is located in Chiba, the prefecture adjacent to Tokyo and the sister-state of Wisconsin. Take courses in Japanese language and culture. For those proficient in Japanese, a wide variety of courses in many different disciplines are offered.

Japan: Nanzan University Exchange. This exchange in Nagoya, Japan is ideal for learners of Japanese at all levels. Courses in a variety of disciplines are taught in English.

Japan: Seijo University Exchange. Qualified students may enroll for spring semester or academic year course offerings at Seijo University in Tokyo, Japan. An intensive Japanese language course precedes the start of the program.

Japan: Japan Center for Michigan Universities (JCMU) Study Abroad. Students participating in this fall, spring, or academic-year program will take classes in Japanese language and elective courses in Japanese area studies.

Jordan: AMIDEAST Jordan Study Abroad Program. Study in Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The Qasid Institute for Modern Standard & Classical Arabic is AMIDEAST's partner for this program. Students will take up to 7 credits of Arabic and an interdisciplinary course on contemporary Jordan, and they will choose from elective courses in several diverse subject areas including social sciences, the humanities, and natural sciences. Internships are available.

Korea: Ajou University Exchange. This summer, spring semester, or academic year program is located in Suwon, South Korea. The University is unique because there are over 100 courses taught in English that closely match UWM offerings, especially in the sciences. Korean language and culture classes also are offered.

Korea: Keimyung University Exchange. Students study Korean language and culture, choosing from more than 100 courses in international studies, business, and art taught in English.

Mexico: Tec Monterrey Exchange. This fall, spring, summer or academic year exchange at the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey offers students a wide variety of liberal arts, business, and engineering courses for intermediate to advanced Spanish speakers.

Morocco: AMIDEAST Study Abroad in Rabat. AMIDEAST partners with Mohammed V University-Agdal and the Institute of African Studies for this program. All students take Modern Standard and Moroccan Arabic and then choose from various Middle East and North African studies courses. French courses also are available.

Morocco: AMIDEAST Study Abroad in Ifrane. For this program, AMIDEAST partners with Al Akhawayn University (known as AUI) located in the mountain resort town of Ifrane about 60 miles south of Fez. AUI was established in the mid-1990s and is the only English language institution in Morocco based on the US model of higher education and campus structure.

Peru: Pontifícia Universidad Católica del Peru Study Abroad. Located in Lima, Peru, this fall or spring semester or academic year program offers participants the opportunity to study a wide variety of courses from many disciplines, including liberal arts and Spanish language courses, at the prestigious university.

Spain: CIEE Seville Study Abroad Program. This semester, year, or summer program in Seville is sponsored by CIEE. Students study Spanish language and choose a variety of other courses in civilization, culture, business and education by following a distinct program track. Credit-bearing internships also are available. Courses taken through this program cannot be counted toward a Spanish major or minor at UWM.

Spain: Universidad de Vigo Exchange. Located in Galicia, Spain, students will have the opportunity to earn undergraduate or graduate credits in a variety of disciplines during a semester or year-long stay.

Spain: Universidad de Santiago de Compostela Exchange. In this semester or year-long exchange program, students can earn undergraduate or graduate credits in a wide variety of disciplines.

Sweden: Jonkoping Exchange. Students may study at Jonkoping University for a semester or for an academic year. Engineering, business, and economics courses are taught in English.

Sweden: Malardalen Exchange. Learn about Swedish language and culture, Scandinavian studies, and a variety of other classes, some of which are conducted in English.

Taiwan: Mandarin Training Center Study Abroad. The Mandarin Training Center is the Chinese language training unit of the National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei, which is known for its innovative curriculum and small class sizes.

Thailand: Mae Fah Luang University Exchange. Students select from a variety of courses in English that include Hmong and heritage studies, computer science, management and law.

Turkey: Middle East Technical University Exchange. Study at one of Turkey's most competitive universities located in Ankara, Turkey's urban capital. Students will be offered courses taught in English in a variety of disciplines.

For more information concerning these exchange and study abroad programs, please contact the Center for International Education, located in Pearse Hall 166, (414) 229-5182, www.studyabroad.uwm.edu.

UROP

The Undergraduate Research Opportunity (UROP) in the College of Letters and Science pairs students with faculty researchers across the University. Building on a long tradition of undergraduate research at UWM, the UROP assists undergraduates, even in their first years at UWM, to have the opportunity to engage, in a structured setting, with the research mission of the University. Students work side-by-side with faculty members on faculty research projects, and they receive academic credit for their work. The UROP is designed for highly motivated students who want to contribute to the creation of knowledge instead of just acquire it.

Interested students can request information online at our.uwm.edu or by contacting the UROP office (414-229-2641). The UROP staff will help students identify possible research projects and arrange for students to meet with the faculty members. Accepted students commit to a year-long course (for up to 6 credits) as an apprentice to a faculty mentor and, in addition, participate in a required one-credit research seminar with other students in the program. For more information, visit the UROP website.

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITIES UNITED NATIONS SUMMER SEMINAR

Since 1966, students from all UW System campuses and other universities have participated in this 6-credit program. Selected students spend one week at UW-Milwaukee in intensive study of international organizations and the United Nations. The Seminar then moves to New York City for one month, where attention shifts to briefings, library research, and personal interviews with the personnel of the UN and various national missions. Students also use the UN’s Dag Hammarskjold Library for documentary research.

This program is administered by the Center for International Education (CIE) in the College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. For more information, contact CIE, Pearse Hall 166, (414) 229-5182.

Cultures and Communities Program

Cosponsored by the College of Letters and Science, the Cultures and Communities Program is open to undergraduate students in all of UWM's schools and colleges. The Cultures and Communities (CC) certificate brings together students and faculty members from many areas of the arts, sciences, humanities, social sciences, education, and the health professions.

The CC certificate provides a meaningful general education experience through courses focusing on U.S. multicultural studies, global and international perspectives, and the community and cultural contexts of art, science, health, and technology. It also contains a service learning/community engagement component that offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of off-campus learning experiences in the Milwaukee community.

Students may earn the CC certificate while satisfying their L&S distribution and University general education requirements. In doing so, students can strengthen their preparation for careers in education, business, law, government, health care, and any other career areas that involve community engagement. Such professions increasingly demand applicants who have developed multicultural awareness, intercultural communication skills, and an understanding of how globalization affects us all.

More detailed information about the CC certificate can be found online at cc.uwm.edu. Requirements for the certificate are listed in the General Education Requirements section of this catalog. A list of courses approved for the certificate appears in the L&S Certificate Programs section of the catalog. For more information, consult with the Interdepartmental Programs coordinator, Kate Powers, at powersk@uwm.edu or (414) 229-6686.

 


 [ TOP ]

Certificate Programs

Like a departmental minor, certificate programs offer a specific academic focus but differ by being interdisciplinary, allowing students to combine related courses in different disciplines to explore a common theme. Students who earn certificates demonstrate their intellectual commitment to a subject and their competence in scholarly areas, which can prove valuable at the graduate level or in the workplace.

The certificate programs listed below are available to all UWM undergraduates and, in most cases, to students who have previously earned a bachelor's degree from UWM or any other accredited institution. Others may be able to enroll as non-degree students if they meet UWM admission requirements.

Certificates are awarded at the time of graduation or upon completion of the program requirements.


Pre-Professional Programs


 [ TOP ] Pre-Forestry (Wildlife Management)


 [ TOP ] Pre-Dentistry


 [ TOP ] Pre-Law


 [ TOP ] Pre-Medicine


 [ TOP ] Pre-Pharmacy


 [ TOP ] Pre-Veterinary Medicine


 [ TOP ]

Other Pre-Professional Health Study

Students interested in chiropractic medicine, optometry, physician assistant, and podiatry careers can fulfill the admission requirements of these professional programs in the College of Letters and Science. Information concerning these requirements and the admission tests for the professional schools is available in the Student Academic Services office. The advisor for these areas is Patricia Cobb.

See also the Colleges of Health Sciences and Nursing for information on health studies programs that students can complete at UWM.


 [ TOP ]

Special Areas of Study

Courses that do not appear elsewhere in this catalog are listed herein.

Courses


 [ TOP ] L&S Humanities (L&S HUM)


 [ TOP ] L&S Natural Sciences (L&S NS)


 [ TOP ] L&S Social Sciences (L&S SS)


 [ TOP ] Literature in Translation

Peer Mentoring. See L&S HUM 291, 292, 391.

UROP. See L&S HUM 296, L&S NS 296, L&S SS 294, 295, 296.

Washington Internship. See L&S SS 498.


University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014:
College of Letters and Science
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