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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014


College of Letters and Science


Anthropology


Anthropology is the study of human beings and their cultures, past and present, throughout the world. The discipline examines and compares the world’s culture patterns in all their variety and studies humans as biological organisms. Through archaeology, it attempts to shed light on the long history and evolution of humans and their ways of life. In these pursuits, anthropologists favor comparative and evolutionary perspectives. As a result, anthropological studies are wide-ranging with respect to topic and far-reaching with respect to both space and time.

A major in anthropology serves the needs of at least three kinds of students: 1) those who seek as part of their liberal arts education to gain a broad understanding of human behavior, 2) those whose professional or career interests require insight into otherwise unfamiliar peoples and cultures, and 3) those who wish to specialize in anthropology or one of its subfields.

A major in anthropology provides a useful and relevant foundation for many kinds of jobs and career interests. These include numerous types of positions abroad working with people of varied cultural backgrounds, such as community development work in the international field, foreign diplomatic service, international business, and international exchange programs. They also include positions in museum work, the communications field, community cultural projects, urban planning, and other social professions. There are opportunities for students majoring in anthropology to develop skills in conservation archaeology and environmental impact assessment.

Course of Study: Major

Students majoring in anthropology can select from a wide variety of courses organized under four subfields: cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical (or biological) anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Although majors take some course work in each of the four subfields, they are encouraged to shape their own programs to meet individual needs and interests.

The major in anthropology requires 36 credits within the department, including Anthro 101, 102, 103, 105 (360), and one course from each of the five curriculum categories below. At least 15 credits in advanced-level courses (numbered 300 or above) must be taken in residence at UWM.

The College requires that all students must complete a research experience in their majors. Anthropology majors will complete the research requirement in the context of one of the following courses:

Anthro 401

Primate Populations

Anthro 497

Study Abroad: "Peru, Past and Present - Archaeological Perspective" subtitle

 

Anthro 525

Zooarchaeology

 
Anthro 535 Analysis of Archaeological Ceramics  

Anthro 560

Introduction to Research Methods in Anthropology

Anthro 566

Archaeological Analysis and Report Preparation: (Subtitle)

Finally, Anthro 460, "Anthropology Theory," which is the program’s capstone course, is required for all students majoring in anthropology. Only seniors may enroll, and it is recommended that they do so after having completed all other anthropology course requirements.

Students majoring in anthropology must earn a GPA of 2.5 or better in anthropology courses attempted at UWM. In addition, the College requires that students attain a 2.5 or better GPA in all anthropology courses attempted, including any transfer work.

CURRICULUM CATEGORIES

Physical Anthropology

Anthro 301

Human Evolution and Variation

3

Anthro 401

Primate Populations

3

Anthro 402

Primate Evolution

3

Anthro 403

The Human Skeleton

3

Anthro 404

Seminar in Human Evolutionary Physiology

3

Anthro 405 Forensic Anthropology 3
Anthro 406 Evolutionary Biology and Human Diseases 3
Anthro 407 Neuroanthropology 3
Anthro 408 Hormones and Behavior 3
Anthro 651 Biology of the Primates 3

Archaeology

Anthro 304

Violence and Warfare in Prehistory

3

Anthro 305

The Celtic World

3

Anthro 306 European Archaeology 3

Anthro 307

World Archaeology: Foundations of Civilization

3

Anthro 308

Archaeology of North America

3

Anthro 309

Archaeology of Central and South America

3

Anthro 310

Archaeology of Middle America

3

Anthro 311 The World of the Ancient Maya 3
Anthro 420 Power and Ideology in Archaeology 3
Anthro 421 Cities in the Ancient World 3
Anthro 425 Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways: Past and Present 3
Anthro 465 Historic Preservation in Archaeology 3
Anthro 466 Historical Archaeology 3
Anthro 501 Archaeology of Death 3
Anthro 525 Zooarchaeology: Analysis of Faunal Remains 3
Anthro 535 Analysis of Archaeological Ceramics 3
Anthro 565 Seminar in Regional Archaeology: (Subtitle) 3
Anthro 636 Geochronology 3

Ethnology and Related Sociocultural Subjects

Anthro 302

Anthropology and Popular Culture

3

Anthro 314

American Indian Societies and Cultures

3

Anthro 315

Peoples and Cultures of Mexico and Central America

3

Anthro 320

Peoples and Cultures of Africa

3

Anthro 322 Europe in Anthropological Perspective 3

Anthro 323

Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia

3

Anthro 325 Japanese Culture and Society 3

Anthro 326

Peoples and Cultures of South Asia

3

Anthro 328

Comparative Studies of Music, Race, and Gender in Nationalism

3

Anthro 335

American Indians of the Southeast

3

Anthro 340 Cultures of Online Games and Virtual Worlds 3

Anthro 349

Seminar in Ethnography and Cultural Processes

3

Anthro 354

Anthropology of Art

3

Anthro 355 Globalization, Culture, and Environment 3
Anthro 361 Anthropological Theories of Religion 3

Anthro 400

Human Sociobiology

3

Anthro 431

Urban Anthropology

3

Anthro 440

Medical Anthropology

3

Anthro 441 Nature, Knowledge, and Technoscience in Anthropological Perspective 3
Anthro 442 Humanitarianism in Global Perspective 3
Anthro 443 Medicine and Pharmaceuticals in the Global Age 3

Anthro 445

Psychological Anthropology

3

Anthro 446

The Child in Different Cultures

3

Anthro 447 The Global Politics of Human Rights 3

Anthro 448

Cultural and Human Ecology

3

Anthro 449

Economic Anthropology

3

Anthro 450

Political Anthropology

3

Anthro 540

Applications of Anthropology

3

Anthro 543

Cross-Cultural Study of Religion

3

Anthro 544 Religious Giving in Anthropological Perspective 3

Linguistic Anthropology

Anthro 361

Applications in Linguistic Anthropology

3

Anthro 362 System Failure: Globalization and Language Extinction 3

Anthro 366

Seminar in Aspects of Linguistic Anthropology

3

Anthro 570 Issues in Bilingualism 3

Methods Courses

Anthro 560

Introduction to Research Methods in Anthropology

3

Anthro 561

Techniques and Problems in Ethnography

3

Anthro 562

Techniques and Problems in Archaeology

3

Anthro 566

Archaeological Analysis and Report Preparation: (Subtitle)

3 or 6

Anthro 567

Archaeological Field School

3 or 6

Anthro 568

Introduction to Anthropological Statistics

3

Course of Study: Minor

The anthropology minor requires 18 credits within the department, including Anthro 101, 102, and one course from each of the following curriculum categories: physical anthropology, archaeology, ethnology, and linguistics. Waiver or substitution in any of these categories may be approved, in some circumstances, by the assistant to the chair for undergraduate affairs in consultation with the student’s advisor. Students must earn 9 credits in advanced-level courses (numbered 300 or above) taken in residence at UWM. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA on all credits in the minor attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor credits attempted, including any transfer work.

Related Programs

For the teaching major in the broad field of social studies, see the School of Education section. A related interdepartmental major is the international studies major. Also related are the certificate programs in American Indian Studies and in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Courses (ANTHRO)

Faculty

Cheryl Ajirotutu, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Fred Anapol, Prof., Ph.D.
State University of New York at Stony Brook

Kalman Applbaum, Prof., Ph.D
Harvard University

Bettina Arnold, Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

Erica Bornstein, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine

Paul Brodwin, Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

Benjamin Campbell, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

J. Patrick Gray, Prof., Ph.D., Chair
University of Colorado

Sidney M. Greenfield, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Tracey Heatherington, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

Jean Hudson, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Barbara

Robert J. Jeske, Prof., Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Ingrid Jordt, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

Donald Kurtz, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Thomas Malaby, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

Bernard Perley, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Harvard University

R. Jason Sherman, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Neil C. Tappen, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Trudy R. Turner, Prof., Ph.D.
New York University

Laura P. Villamil, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

William Washabaugh, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Edward Wellin, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

William Wood, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana

Associate Scientists

John D. Richards, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Patricia Richards, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Research Specialist

Brian Nicholls, M.S.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 



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