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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014


College of Letters and Science


Biological Sciences


Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze organisms at the cellular and molecular levels using genetics, biochemistry, and microscopy.  They also study interactions of organisms with each other and with the environment using behavior, morphology, and genetics.  These studies have applications across many areas including agriculture, medicine, and the environment.

Majors in biology are needed in areas such as farming, food processing, bioremediation, as well as the biomedical and biotechnology fields.  A biology major also prepares students for professional careers in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary science, and education, in addition to advanced studies in the life science field.

The Department offers two majors: biological sciences and microbiology. The biological sciences major has two options: the Standard option and the Cell and Molecular Biology option. Both majors and options are excellent preparation for a career in a life science field. The multiple offerings allow students a broad choice in their studies.

Course of Study: Biological Sciences Major

The biological sciences major requires a minimum of 34 credits in biology, of which 26 must be at the advanced (300 and above) level. At least 15 of the advanced credits must be taken in residence at UWM. Students must complete four laboratory courses. No more than 8 credits in 100-level courses in biological sciences may be applied toward the major, and students may not combine 150, 202, and 203 for more than 9 credits toward the major. Students must attain an average GPA of 2.5 in biological sciences courses attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain at least a 2.5 GPA on all major credits attempted, including any transfer work.

Additionally, Math 211, 221, or 231 for a Bachelor of Science (Math 105 or equivalent for a Bachelor of Arts), Physics 120 and 122 or equivalent, one semester of physics lab (121 or above), and either the survey of organic chemistry with lab (Chem 341, 342) or the one-year organic chemistry sequence with one lab (Chem 343, 344, 345) are required. For students in the cell and molecular biology option, Chem 343, 344, and 345 are required, and Physics 123 is strongly recommended. Students who plan to attend graduate or professional schools are advised strongly to take the one-year sequence of organic chemistry with lab, a course in biochemistry, and two semesters of calculus.

STANDARD BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES OPTION

Required Biological Sciences Courses

Bio Sci 150

Foundations of Biological Sciences I

4

Bio Sci 152

Foundations of Biological Sciences II

4

Bio Sci 325

Genetics

3

Either:

Bio Sci 310

General Ecology

4

or both

Bio Sci 315 Cell Biology 3

and

   

Bio Sci 316

Laboratory in Genetics and Cell Biology

2

Research Requirement: one of Bio Sci 611, 670, 671, or CES 490 (a senior seminar); Honors 686, 687, or 689 (Honors research, project, or thesis); or Bio Sci 698 or 699 (independent study).

Electives to reach a total of 26 upper-division credits and four laboratory courses.

CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OPTION

Core Courses

Bio Sci 150

Foundations of Biological Sciences I

4

Bio Sci 152

Foundations of Biological Sciences II

4

Bio Sci 315

Cell Biology

3

Bio Sci 316

Laboratory in Genetics and Cell Biology

2

Bio Sci 325 Genetics 3

Laboratory Courses - At least one of the following:

Bio Sci 203

Anatomy and Physiology II

4

Bio Sci 372

Animal Physiology and Neurobiology Laboratory

1
(take with Bio Sci 354 or 370: see below)

Bio Sci 383

General Microbiology

4

Bio Sci 402

Immunological Techniques

3
(take with Bio Sci 401; see below)

Bio Sci 539 Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Biology 4

Bio Sci 543

Scanning Electron Microscopy Laboratory

2
(take with Bio Sci 542; see below)

Bio Sci 544

Transmission Electron Microscopy Laboratory

3
(take with Bio Sci 542; see below)

Bio Sci 580

Experimental Microbiology

4

Electives

At least one of the following:

Bio Sci 354

Introduction to Neuroscience I: From Neuron to Brain

3

Bio Sci 356

Developmental Biology

4

Bio Sci 370

Animal Physiology

3

Bio Sci 383

General Microbiology

4

At least one of the following:

Bio Sci 401

Immunology

2

Bio Sci 490

Molecular Genetics

3

Bio Sci 500

Plant Physiology

3

Bio Sci 529

Molecular Biology of Microorganisms

3

Bio Sci 540 Microbial Diversity and Physiology 3

Bio Sci 542

Biological Electron Microscopy

3

Bio Sci 545

Physiology of Reproduction

3

Bio Sci 556

Developmental Neurobiology

3 or 4

Bio Sci 564

Endocrinology

3

Bio Sci 565

Eucaryotic Gene Regulation

3

Bio Sci 573

Cellular Evolution

3

Bio Sci 587

Molecular Signal Transduction

3

Bio Sci 595

Molecular Biotechnology

3

Bio Sci 596

Neuropharmacology

3

Bio Sci 597

RNA Structure, Function, and Metabolism

3

Bio Sci 607

Environmental Microbiology

3

Capstone - At least 1 credit in one of the following:

Bio Sci 697

Independent Study in Cell and Molecular Biology

1-3 (under development)

Bio Sci 672

Undergraduate Seminar in Cell and Molecular Biology

1 (under development)

Students must select additional courses from the above list to reach a total of 18 credits beyond the core courses.

Course of Study: Microbiology Major

Microbiology is the study of microorganisms such as bacteria, archaea, protists, fungi, and viruses. The major in microbiology requires a minimum of 35 credits in microbiology; the required and elective courses in Bio Sci, Chem 501, and C L Sci 534, 535, 539, and 540 count as "microbiology" courses for this purpose. At least 15 credits of advanced (300 and above) microbiology courses must be taken in residence at UWM. Students must attain an average GPA of 2.5 in microbiology courses attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all major credits attempted, including any transfer work. The following courses are required:

Required Microbiology Courses

Bio Sci 150

Foundations of Biological Sciences I

4

Bio Sci 152

Foundations of Biological Sciences II

4

Bio Sci 315 Cell Biology (or Chem 501 Introduction to Biochemistry) 3

Bio Sci 325

Genetics

3

Bio Sci 383

General Microbiology

4

Bio Sci 529

Molecular Biology of Microorganisms

3

Bio Sci 540

Microbial Diversity and Physiology

3

Bio Sci 580

Experimental Microbiology

4

or    
Bio Sci 539 Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Biology 4

Research Requirement
: Bio Sci 495, 671, 698 or, when determined by the student's microbiology faculty advisor to have microbiology content, Bio Sci 699, or Honors 686, 687, or 689. (For titles and credits, see electives list.)

Elective Microbiology Courses: students must take a minimum of 6 credits from among the following courses.

Bio Sci 316

Laboratory in Genetics and Cell Biology

2

Bio Sci 401

Immunology

2

Bio Sci 402

Immunological Techniques

3

Bio Sci 405

General Virology

3

Bio Sci 425 Plankton Biology 4

Bio Sci 490 (660)

Molecular Genetics

3

Bio Sci 4951

Internship in Biotechnology, Upper Division

3-6

Bio Sci 536

Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

2

Bio Sci 539

Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Biology

4 (if not selected above)

Bio Sci 542

Biological Electron Microscopy

3

Bio Sci 544

Transmission Electron Microscopy Laboratory

3

Bio Sci 572

Genomics

3

Bio Sci 573

Cellular Evolution

3

Bio Sci 580 Experimental Microbiology 4 (if not selected above)
Bio Sci 595 Principles of Genetic and Molecular Engineering 3
Bio Sci 607 Environmental Microbiology 3
Bio Sci 667 Advanced Techniques in Microbial, Molecular, and Cellular Biology 4
Bio Sci 671 Undergraduate Seminar in Microbiology: (Subtitle) (may not count for more than 1 of the elective credits) 1
Bio Sci 698 Independent Study in Microbiology
1-3 (per semester)
Bio Sci 6991 Independent Study 1-3 (per semester)
Chem 501 Introduction to Biochemistry 3 (if not selected above)
Chem 601 Biochemistry: Protein Structure and Function 3
BMS 5342 Medical Microbiology 2
BMS 5352 Medical Microbiology Laboratory

2

BMS 5392 Public Health Microbiology 2
BMS 5402 Public Health Microbiology Laboratory

1

Honors 6861 Research in Honors 2-3
Honors 6871 Senior Honors Project 1-6
Honors 6891 Senior Honors Thesis 3

1 Only Bio Sci 699 or Honors 686, 687, or 689 projects that are determined by the student's microbiology faculty advisor to have microbiology content count toward the major.

2Students may elect to take these BMS courses to earn credit toward the microbiology major option provided that they earn 30 credits in Natural Sciences within the College of Letters and Science, as required for the B.S. degree.

Other Required Courses

Chem 343

Organic Chemistry

3

Chem 344

Organic Chemistry Laboratory

2

Chem 345

Organic Chemistry

3

Math 211

Survey in Calculus and Analytic Geometry

4

or

   

Math 221

Honors Calculus I

5

or

   

Math 231

Calculus and Analytical Geometry

4

One of the following sets of three physics courses:

Physics 120

General Physics I (Non-calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 122

General Physics II (Non-calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 123

General Physics Laboratory II (Non-calculus Treatment)

1

or

Physics 209

Physics I (Calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 210

Physics II (Calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 215

Lab Physics II (Calculus Treatment)

1

Prospective microbiology majors should consult with a faculty advisor as early as possible, preferably before the beginning of the junior year, in order to outline an appropriate course of study. A list of faculty advisors in microbiology is available in the Biological Sciences Department office or on the department's home page (www4.uwm.edu/letsci/biologicalsciences/). Students should consult their advisor at least once each semester.

Honors in the Major

Students in biological sciences who meet all of the following criteria are awarded honors in the major upon graduation:

1. 3.5 cumulative GPA in all UWM graded credits;

2. 3.75 GPA in UWM courses counting toward the major;

3. complete a laboratory or field research independent study (Bio Sci 698 or 699) or internship (Bio Sci 489 or Env St 489).

Students who believe they may qualify for honors in biological sciences should apply to the Department during their last semester of study.

Course of Study: Minor

Students with a major in another discipline can apply for a minor in biological sciences by meeting the requirements listed below, completing the appropriate “Declaration of Minor” form, and meeting with a Department of Biological Sciences advisor.

Requirements: The minor consists of 19 credits in biological sciences including 150 and 152 (or equivalent). The 11 additional credits must be in courses that carry credit toward the major. At least 9 credits must be taken at or above the 300 level in residence at UWM and at least one course must be a laboratory course at the 300 level or above. Students must maintain an average GPA of 2.5 in minor courses attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor courses attempted, including any transfer work.

Declaration of Major or Minor in Biological Sciences
Students should contact an advisor (see list below) as soon as possible in their freshman year about required courses and the recommended course sequence within biological sciences.  They should complete Bio Sci 150 and 152, Chem 102 and 104, and Math 105 before officially declaring a major in biological sciences.  Upon declaring the major, the student must select from the list below a Department of Biological Sciences faculty advisor who will guide the student in planning his/her curriculum and will help the student accomplish his/her goals.  Failure to complete the declaration of major, as recommended, may result in a delay in graduation.

Procedure for Processing a Declaration of Major or Minor:

1. Obtain and complete a “Declaration of Major (or Minor) Form” from the Department of Biological Sciences office (Lapham Hall S181).

2. Select a departmental advisor in the area of interest (see list below) and set up an advising appointment by sending an email to the prospective advisor as follows:

* The “subject box” of the email should say “Appointment to Declare Major (or Minor).”

* The text of the message should give days and times the student is available to meet for advice about the major/minor and curriculum. Take the “Declaration of Major/Minor Form” and an up-to-date student copy transcript to the advising appointment at which the advisor will sign the form.  After this initial meeting, return to meet with the departmental advisor regularly to discuss academic progress

3. Return the “Declaration of Major/Minor Form,” with the advisor’s signature, to Ms. Cynthia Bias in Lapham Hall S181.  Ms Bias will obtain the Department Chair’s signature and forward the form to the College of Letters and Science Office of Student Academic Services.

4. Meet each semester with the assigned College of Letters and Science adviso (in Holton Hall); the L&S advisor will monitor progress towards completion of the L&S degree requirements.

Department Advisors

Biological Sciences advisors

Lapham Office

E-mail (@uwm.edu)

Professor Berges -- Marine Biology
Professor Coggins – Parasitology
Professor Dunn – Behavioral Ecology
Professor Ehlinger – Aquatic Ecology
Professor Karron – Plant Ecology
Professor Schnitzer – Plant Ecology
Professor Strickler -- Ecology
Professor Whittingham – Behavioral Ecology
Professor Young – Plant Physiology

S587
S297
S497
S493
S585
S595
Water Inst. 137
S499
S593

berges
coggins
pdunn
ehlinger
karron
s1
jrs
whitting
ebyoung

Cellular & Molecular Biology option advisors

 

 

Professor Heathcote – Neuroscience
Professor Hutz – Physiology
Professor Steeber – Immunology
Professor Udvadia – Neuroscience
Professor Wejksnora – Molecular Biology
Professor Wimpee – Molecular Biology
Professor Witten – Neuroscience
Professor Zhao – Molecular Genetics

N411
N509
N211
SB80
220
S495
N409
462

rdh
rjhutz
steeber
audvadia
pjw
cwimpee
jlw
dzhao

Microbiology advisors

 

 

Professor Forst – Molecular Biology
Professor Kuchin – Genetics
Professor McBride – Molecular Biology
Professor Saffarini – Environmental Microbiology
Professor Yang – Genomics

458
442
N307
N309
131D

sforst
skuchin
mcbride
daads
chyang

 

Advisors for Related Programs

Major in Conservation & Environmental Science

 

 

Professor Fredlund – Biogeography

364

fredlund

Pre-professional (Med., Vet., Dental)

 

 

Patti Cobb

Holton 130

pacobb

Related Areas of Study

The Conservation and Environmental Science major is an alternative, interdisciplinary program for students with specific interests in conservation or environmental science (see Interdepartmental Majors, College of Letters and Science).

For the Pre-Forestry (Wildlife Management) curriculum, see the Pre-Professional Programs section (College of Letters and Science).

Pigeon Lake Field Station is a natural laboratory sponsored by the 14 campuses of the University of Wisconsin System, located in the Chequamegon National Forest, 30 miles from Lake Superior in northern Wisconsin’s Bayfield County. Pigeon Lake Field Station offers summer programs in a variety of disciplines, including biology. Work completed at Pigeon Lake is credited as resident study by UWM. For additional information, contact the Biological Sciences Department office.

The UWM Field Station is an area of almost 2,500 acres devoted to the study of natural history and biology. Located about 25 miles north of campus on the Cedarburg Bog in the Town of Saukville, the station includes a wide variety of natural areas ranging from old-growth forest to acid bog and several lakes. Many biological sciences courses use the Field Station for instruction and to provide hands-on research opportunities. The Field Station provides internship and independent study opportunities for biology students; it also offers short courses for credit through the department. For additional information, contact the Biological Sciences Department office.

Courses (BIO SCI)

Crosslisted Courses

The following courses offered by other departments may be used to fulfill the requirements of the undergraduate major and minor in biological sciences.

CES 471 Principles of Natural Resources Management  
CES 490 Senior Seminar: Conservation and Environmental Science  
Psych 254 Physiological Psychology  
Psych 654 Advanced Physiological Psychology  

Faculty and Staff

Felipe Alberto, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.,
University of Algarve, Portugal

Sonia Bardi, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Queen's University, Ontario

John Berges, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of British Columbia

Gerald Bergtrom, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Martin Boraas, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Arthur S. Brooks, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

John Buntin, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Yi-Qiang (Eric) Cheng, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Michigan State University

James R. Coggins, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Wake Forest University

Mary Lynne Perille Collins, Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Madhusudan Dey, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Jawaharlal Nehru University, India

Peter Dunn, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Alberta

Timothy Ehlinger, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Michigan State University

Millicent S. Ficken, Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Steven Forst, Prof., Ph.D.
New York University

Ralph Grunewald, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Jennifer Gutzman, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison

R. David Heathcote, Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Gerlinde Hobel, Asst. Prof., Dr. Nat. Sc.
University of Ulm, Germany

Sara B. Hoot, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Reinhold Hutz, Prof., Ph.D.
Michigan State University

Jeffrey Karron, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Colorado

Geoffrey S. Kennedy, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus

Sergei Kuchin, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Institute of Genetics (Moscow)

Emily Latch, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Purdue University

Jakob R. Loewenberg, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Mark McBride, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Clifford H. Mortimer, UWM Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, D.Sc.

Julie A. Oliver, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Marianna Orlova, Instrument Innovator
Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow

Heather A. Owen, Assoc. Scientist., Ph.D.
Miami University

Andrew Petto, Lect., Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Ruth B. Phillips, Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Gyaneshwar Prasad, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, India

Christopher C. Quinn, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Yale University

Charles C. Remsen, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Rafael Rodríguez, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Kansas

Daad A. Saffarini, Prof., Ph.D., Chair
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Peter J. Salamun, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Colin Scanes, Prof., Ph.D., D.Sc
University of Wales, Hull University

Dianne Seale, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Stefen Schnitzer, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh

Cynthia V. Sommer, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Douglas Steeber, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison

J. Rudi Strickler, Distinguished Prof., Ph.D.
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology

Ava Udvadia, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Duke University

Donna Van Wynsberghe, Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Eldon D. Warner, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Roslyn P. Warren, Prof. Emerita, Ph.D.

Peter J. Wejksnora, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Brandeis University

Linda A. Whittingham, Prof., Ph.D.
Queens University, Ontario

Charles F. Wimpee, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

Jane Witten, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Chicago

Ching-Hong Yang, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Riverside

Erica Young, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Monash University (Melbourne, Australia)

Dazhong Zhao, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Chinese Academy of Science

Adjunct Faculty

Gretchen A. Meyer, Adjunct Assoc. Scientist, Ph.D.
Cornell University

James R. Moyer, Jr., Assoc. Prof., Ph.D., Psychology
Northwestern University

Valerica Raicu, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D., Physics
University of Bucharest, Romania

James A. Reinartz, Adjunct Senior Scientist, Ph.D.
Duke University

Marius Schmidt, Asst. Prof., Ph.D., Physics
Technical University of Munich


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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