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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015

College of Letters & Science

Chemistry and Biochemistry

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry curriculum provides a thorough undergraduate education for students planning careers as research scientists, industrial chemists, and educators in universities or in secondary schools. In addition, department courses provide a foundation in the basic science of chemistry to students majoring in biological or physical sciences, students planning a career in medicine or other health-related fields, students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and students in the liberal arts. Especially in its graduate programs, the department stresses interdisciplinary approaches, as exemplified by the Laboratory for Surface Studies and the Great Lakes WATER Institute. It also cooperates with chemists of the Milwaukee area’s industrial and scientific community.

Prerequisite Preparation for Majors in Chemistry and Biochemistry

General chemistry is a prerequisite to all further courses in chemistry. This requirement is satisfied by Chem 102 and 104 (10 cr.). Students without high school chemistry or whose background in science is weak may need to take Chem 100 first.

Mathematics and physics also are required for a major in chemistry. Three semesters of calculus and two semesters of calculus-based physics (or equivalents) are prerequisites to physical chemistry, which in turn is required for the advanced chemistry courses that are part of the major.

Students considering a major in chemistry or biochemistry should enroll in general chemistry and mathematics in their first semester if at all possible, and physics should be started as soon as its prerequisites are met. Because the study of chemistry is cumulative, postponing one’s start in math and chemistry courses is likely to delay completion of the degree. It is recommended that chemistry majors follow the suggested sequence for the Course in Chemistry degree program as closely as possible for the first two years. (See L&S "Special Degree Programs" section of this catalog.)

Students are urged to contact the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department for academic advice as soon as they believe they have an interest in a major in chemistry.

Course of Study: Major Options in Chemistry and Biochemistry

Students may choose from four different curricular options in chemistry and biochemistry:

1. Standard Chemistry Major

2. Course in Chemistry Degree Program

3. Standard Chemistry Major with a Biochemical Option

4. Biochemistry Major

For any option, at least 15 credits must be taken in chemistry courses numbered 300 or above in residence at UWM. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA on all credits in the major attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all credits attempted, including any transfer work. Undergraduate research is encouraged strongly for students in any of the chemistry options. In some cases, students may start research with a faculty member as early as their freshman year. Information about research opportunities may be obtained from the department office or from SAACS (the American Chemical Society student affiliate group). Premedical students who choose to follow one of the chemistry or biochemistry options should see the L&S pre-professional programs section in this catalog and should consult their premedical advisor and an advisor in chemistry regularly.

Requirements and standard timetable for obtaining a degree with these fields of study are provided below.

Declaration of Major Requirements. To declare a chemistry or biochemistry major, the following are required:

  • Completion of Chem 102 and 104;
  • Completion or concurrent registration in Chem 343; and
  • A GPA of 2.5 or better in all Chem courses attempted.

Students who are interested in graduate work in biochemistry should follow the standard chemistry major with a biochemical option.

Standard Chemistry Major Option. The standard chemistry major option may be followed in either the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. It provides a suitable background for students preparing for employment in chemistry and related scientific fields or for subsequent graduate study.

REQUIREMENTS

General Chemistry (CHEM 102 & 104)

Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 221)

Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 311)

Organic Chemistry (CHEM 343, 344, & 345)

Instrument Analysis (CHEM 524)

Physical Chemistry (CHEM 561, 562, & 563)

Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 582 or 584)

Biochemistry or Advanced Inorganic Elective (CHEM 501 or 511)


Independent Research (CHEM 691 or 692) (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Calculus (MATH 231, 232, & 233, MATH 234 recommended)

Physics (calculus-based), with lab (PHYSICS 209, 210, 214, & 215)

Course in Chemistry Degree Program (Approved by the American Chemical Society)

The Course in Chemistry is a professional degree program that follows a curriculum approved by the American Chemical Society. It differs from the chemistry major in requiring more courses in chemistry and fewer in the social sciences and humanities. While any of the chemistry curriculum options (except the biochemistry major), with an appropriate choice of electives, provides a suitable basis for graduate study or employment in chemistry or a related field, the Course in Chemistry is a more complete program and carries additional professional recognition.

REQUIREMENTS

General Chemistry (CHEM 102 & 104)

Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 221)

Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 311)

Organic Chemistry (CHEM 343, 344, & 345)

Instrument Analysis (CHEM 524)

Physical Chemistry (CHEM 561, 562, & 563)

Advanced Chemistry Laboratories (CHEM 582 & 584)

Biochemistry (CHEM 501)

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 511)

Independent Research (CHEM 691 or 692)

Calculus (MATH 231, 232, 233 & 234)

Physics (calculus-based), with lab (PHYSICS 209, 210, 214, & 215)

The Course in Chemistry also has specific requirements outside of the sciences. To graduate, students are required to have an overall GPA of 2.0 and a 2.5 GPA in chemistry courses other than Chem 106. A total of at least 18 credits in the humanities, social sciences, and arts is required. This course array supersedes the College of Letters & Science breadth requirements; courses must be selected to include the campus-wide GER distribution requirements (6 cr. each in humanities and social sciences, 3 cr. in arts, and 3 cr. in cultural diversity). Students also must complete two courses (at least 6 credits) in a single language (including American Sign Language) other than English at the 100 level or above with grades of C or higher. This requirement is satisfied by two years of a single language (including American Sign Language) other than English taken in high school. English 102 with a grade of C or better or a score of 4 on the English placement exam also is required.

See the Course in Chemistry entry in the L&S Degree Programs section of this catalog for additional information.

Standard Chemistry Major with a Biochemical Option. The standard chemistry major with a biochemical option differs from the standard major option in that some of the chemistry courses required by the standard option are omitted, and courses in biochemistry and biological sciences are added. Some students planning further study in biochemistry, molecular biology, or medicine may prefer this option.

REQUIREMENTS

General Chemistry (CHEM 102 & 104)

Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 221)

Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 311)

Organic Chemistry (CHEM 343, 344, & 345)

Instrument Analysis (CHEM 524)

Physical Chemistry (CHEM 561, 562, & 563)

Biochemistry (CHEM 501 and two biochemistry courses selected from CHEM 601, 602, 604, & 614)

Biochemistry Laboratory (CHEM 603)

Senior Research (CHEM 691 or 692) (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Biological Sciences (BIO SCI 150 & 325)

Calculus (MATH 231, 232, & 233, MATH 234 recommended)

Physics (calculus-based), with labs (PHYSICS 209, 210, 214, & 215)

SUGGESTED TIMETABLE FOR STANDARD CHEMISTRY MAJOR, COURSE IN CHEMISTRY DEGREE, AND STANDARD CHEMISTRY MAJOR WITH A BIOCHEMICAL OPTION

MODEL FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM
Course (credits)

FRESHMAN YEAR: SEMESTER I
CHEM 102 (5)
MATH precalculus (4)

FRESHMAN YEAR: SEMESTER II
CHEM 104 (5)
MATH 231 calculus (4)

SOPHOMORE YEAR: SEMESTER I
CHEM 343 (3)
CHEM 221 (4)
Math 232 calculus (4)

SOPHOMORE YEAR: SEMESTER II
CHEM 344 (2)
CHEM 345 (3)
Math 233 calculus (4)
Physics 209 (4)
Physics 214 (1)

JUNIOR YEAR: SEMESTER I
CHEM 311 (3)
CHEM 501 (3)* (or take in spring)
Physics 210 (4)
Physics 215 (1)

JUNIOR YEAR: SEMESTER II
CHEM 561 (3)

SENIOR YEAR: SEMESTER I
CHEM 562 (3)
CHEM 563 lab (1)
CHEM 524 (3)
CHEM 582 lab (2)* ** (or take in spring)
CHEM 691 or 692 or 697 (1 or 2)

SENIOR YEAR: SEMESTER II
CHEM 511 (3)*
CHEM 584 lab (2)* ** (or take in fall)
CHEM 524 (3)
CHEM 582 lab (2)* **
CHEM 524 (3)
CHEM 691 or 692 or 697 (1 or 2)

* Courses that may be optional for standard chemistry major; required for the Course in Chemistry degree.

** Courses that are omitted for the standard chemistry major with the biochemical option. In addition, students must take Chem 501, 603, and two courses selected from Chem 601, 602, 604, and 614. Bio Sci 150 and 325 (genetics) also are required for the biochemistry option.

Biochemistry Major. The biochemistry major differs from the standard chemistry major with a biochemical option in a number of ways. It is intended to provide a more intensive education in biochemistry so that students are prepared to work in the biochemical industry upon completing their baccalaureate degree. Students who are interested in graduate work in biochemistry should follow the standard chemistry major with a biochemical option.

REQUIREMENTS

General Chemistry (CHEM 102 & 104)

Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 221)

Organic Chemistry (CHEM 343, 344, & 345)

Physical Chemistry (CHEM 560)

Biochemistry (CHEM 501 and two courses selected from CHEM 601, 602, 604, & 614)

Biochemistry Laboratory (CHEM 603)

Independent Research (CHEM 691 or 692) (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Biological Sciences (BIO SCI 150, 325, and 7 cr. from 315, 516, 356, 383, 401, 402, 405, 490, 529, 539, 540, 564 [630], 572, 573, 580, 595, 607, & 667).

Physics (non-calculus-based), with labs (PHYSICS 120, 121, 122, 123)

Mathematics, including Finite Math (MATH 205), Calculus Survey (MATH 211), & Statistics (MTHSTAT 215)

SUGGESTED TIMETABLE FOR THE BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR
Course (credits)

Freshman Year: Semester I
CHEM 102 (5)
MATH 211 (4)
BIO SCI 150 (4)

Freshman Year: Semester II
CHEM 104 (5)
MATH 205 (3)

Sophomore Year: Semester I
CHEM 221 (4)
CHEM 343 (3)
PHYSICS 120, 121 (5)
MTHSTAT 215 (3)

Sophomore Year: Semester II
CHEM 344 lab (2)
CHEM 345 (3)
PHYSICS 122, 123 (5)
BIO SCI 325 (3)
CHEM 399 (2) (research)

Junior Year: Semester I
CHEM 560 (3)
CHEM 501 (3)

Junior Year: Semester II
BIO SCI Elective (4)
CHEM 602 or 604 biochemistry (3)
CHEM 603 (2)

Senior Year: Semester I
CHEM 601 biochemistry (3)
CHEM 691 or 692 research (2)

Honors in the Major

Students in any of the chemistry or biochemistry options who meet all of the following criteria are awarded honors in the major upon graduation:

• 3.50 cumulative GPA in all UWM graded credits;

• 3.75 GPA in all UWM chemistry credits;

• 3.50 GPA in all advanced credits in chemistry (numbered above 300); and

• Six credits of senior thesis with an average grade of B or better.

Students who believe they may qualify for honors in chemistry should apply to the department during their last semester of study.

A departmental "Undergraduate Awards Program and Research Symposium" is held each spring to highlight undergraduate research accomplishments and honor students who have distinguished themselves in various areas. Among the awards are the Durward Layde Memorial Fellowship, the Chemistry Emeritus Award for the outstanding Junior, the McFarland Awards for the best undergraduate research poster presentations, as well as awards for Outstanding Performance in Introductory Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry (Kovacic Award), and Physical Chemistry (Vanselow Award).

Course of Study: Majors in Other Areas

In addition to programs of study leading to a major in chemistry, the department offers coursework for liberal arts students seeking a nonscientist’s introduction to chemistry as well as for students in other areas whose programs require a background in chemistry. For the liberal arts student, an alternative to the general chemistry courses is Chem 106, "Chemistry in the World Around Us," which qualitatively examines the application of chemical principles to problems of society and everyday life.

Programs in some other science and health-related areas call for a sequence of chemistry courses beginning with the standard general chemistry (Chem 102 and 104). In some cases, this may be followed by alternative courses in organic chemistry (Chem 341) or physical chemistry (Chem 560), which are not accepted as a part of a chemistry major.

Some other professional or preprofessional programs include a sequence consisting of Chem 100 (if needed), Chem 101, and Chem 103. This latter sequence is a terminal one that does not provide prerequisite preparation for any other chemistry courses, and students in these areas who wish to keep their options open for more advanced studies should select the standard general chemistry courses. Students should consult the requirements of their programs before registering.

Teaching Major and Minor. See the School of Education section in this catalog.

Course of Study: Minor

A minor in chemistry may be a useful addition to the programs of students majoring in other natural sciences areas. The minor consists of a minimum of 20 credits in chemistry, with at least 9 of these at or above the 300 level in residence at UWM. These credits must include general chemistry (through Chem 104) and at least one course each from three of the following areas:

Analytical (Chem 221, 524)
Biochemistry (Chem 501, 601, 602, 603, 604)
Inorganic (Chem 311, 511, 614)
Organic (Chem 341-345)
Physical (Chem 560-563)

At least one course with a laboratory, beyond general chemistry, must be taken. Students must maintain an average GPA of 2.5 in all minor courses attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor courses attempted, including any transfer work. Chem 106 does not count toward the minor and is not included in the minor GPA.

For further information regarding degree requirements, see the Chemistry Academic Undergraduate Advisor, Gloria Freschl. Please bring a copy of your transcript when meeting with the advisor to declare a major. Unofficial, free-of-charge UWM transcripts may be obtained from the Department of Enrollment Services in Mellencamp Hall, Room 274.

Courses Chemistry (CHEM)

Faculty

Carolyn Aita, Distinguished Prof. Emerita, PhD

Joseph Aldstadt, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Ohio University

Alexander Arnold, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Dennis W. Bennett, Prof., PhD
University of Utah

Anja Blecking, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Duisburg, Germany

Jian Chen, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Fudan University, P. R. China

James M. Cook, Distinguished Prof., PhD
University of Michigan

Mark Dietz, Prof., PhD
University of Arizona

Walter England, Assoc. Prof Emeritus., PhD

Benjamin Feinberg, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

David Frick, Assoc. Prof., PhD
The Johns Hopkins University

José J. Fripiat, Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Peter Geissinger, Prof., PhD, Chair
University of Bayreuth, Germany

E. Alexander Hill, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

M. Mahmun Hossain, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of South Carolina

Calvin O. Huber, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Guilherme Indig, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of São Paulo, Brazil

Peter J. Kovacic, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Graham Moran, Prof., PhD
University of Michigan

Kristin Murphy, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Arsenio Pacheco-Olivella, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of British Columbia

Xiaohua Peng, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Osnabrück, Germany

David H. Petering, Distinguished Prof., PhD
University of Michigan

Mary Ellen Schaff, Prof. Emerita, MS

Alan Schwabacher, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Columbia University

Frank Shaw, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

B. Richard Siebring, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Nicholas R. Silvaggi, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Connecticut-Storrs

George Sosnovsky, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Kristene Surerus, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota

Wilfred T. Tysoe, Distinguished Prof., PhD
Cambridge University

Ralf W. Vanselow, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Kenneth L. Watters, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Jorg Woehl, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Riverside

SENIOR SCIENTIST

Douglas Stafford, PhD
Tufts University School of Medicine

INSTRUMENTATION INNOVATOR

Leonid Lerner, Researcher, PhD
Cambridge University, U.K.


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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015:
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