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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2015-2016

College of Letters and Science

English

Courses offered in the English curricular area of the Department of English are concerned primarily with the language and literature of English-speaking peoples. They are designed to develop skills in reading and writing and to offer students a variety of approaches to literature, language, and rhetoric. Further, the department seeks to encourage in each student a questioning approach to canon formation and aesthetic criteria, especially through the texts of previously marginalized minority and women writers, in order to gain insight into cultural diversity.

The English as a Second Language curricular area offers instruction in English for students whose native language is not English.

Course of Study: Major

The department welcomes prospective majors who have maintained a minimum 2.500 GPA in their English courses during the freshman and sophomore years.

Prospective majors are expected to consult with the associate chair for undergraduate studies in designing a program that satisfies their individual interests, abilities, and ambitions; if appropriate, a particular requirement may be waived to meet a student’s special programmatic needs. English majors intending to continue their studies in graduate school are urged to plan with the coordinator a program that meets graduate school expectations and prepares them for the Graduate Record Exam.

Students entering with advanced standing are required to earn at least 15 credits in English courses numbered 300 and above while in residence at UWM.

Credit Requirements. All majors are required to take English 215, "Introduction to English Studies." This is a rigorous sophomore-level course designed to introduce students to the discipline; to teach them how to read closely and critically; and to instruct them in the writing of analytical essays. Since English 215 is intended to help students improve their performance in upper-level English courses, it is recommended strongly that students take it before registering for any higher-level courses. All students must complete English 215 before declaring the major.

All courses taken towards the major must be at or above the 300 level unless otherwise noted. Students must complete at least 15 upper-division (numbered 300 and above) credits in the major in residence at UWM. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.500 GPA on all credits in the major attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.500 GPA on all major credits attempted, including any transfer work.

English majors also must complete one of the following tracks. In each track, in their senior year, majors complete a capstone course or senior seminar. This course includes one or more in-depth writing assignments or projects that include a research component, which satisfies the research requirement for the L&S degree.

Track A: Literary and Critical Studies

  • 3 credits in English 215 (Introduction to English Studies)
  • 6 credits in English literature before 1900 (301-304, 451-458, 500-505, 530), including 3 credits in pre-1800 literature (301-303, 451-457, 500-504, 530)
  • 3 credits in American literature before 1900 (307, 308, 460)
  • 3 credits in theory and criticism (378, 390, 392, 394, 395, 402, 432, 545, 547, 626)
  • 6 credits in minority, women's, or global literature (306, 332, 372-377, 381, 463-465, 517, 518, 520-524, 622, 628, 629, 631, 632)
  • 3 credits in advanced intensive writing (415, 416, 430, 431, 433, 434-438, 615, 616)
  • 9 credits in English electives at the 300 level or above
  • 3 credits in a capstone seminar selected from English 620-634, 685 (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Total = 36 credits

Track B: Rhetoric and Writing

  • 3 credits in English 215 (Introduction to English Studies)
  • 3 credits selected from English:
    • 201 (Strategies for Academic Writing)
    • 208 (Writing and Research)
    • 230 (Writing with Style)
  • 3 credits in English 240 (Rhetoric, Writing and Culture)
  • 3 credits in pre-1800 literature (301-303, 451-457, 500-504, 530)
  • 3 credits in English 430 (Advanced Writing Workshop)
  • 3 credits selected from:
    • English 431 (Topics in Advanced Writing with "Rhetorical History and Theory" subtitle)
    • Commun 435 (Rhetoric in Western Thought)
    • Commun 436 (Recent Rhetorical Theory)
  • 3 credits selected from English:
    • 440 (Introduction to Peer Tutoring and Practice)
    • 449 (Writing Internship in English)
  • 3 credits selected from:
    • English 378 (Survey of Current Literary and Cultural Theory)
    • Commun 335 (Critical Analysis of Communication)
  • 3 credits in minority literature selected from English:
    • 372 (Survey of American Indian Literature)
    • 373 (Survey of Ethnic Minority Literature)
    • 374 (Survey of U.S. Latino/a Literature)
    • 375 (Survey of Asian American Literature)
    • 376 (Survey of African American Literature to 1930)
    • 377 (Survey of African American Literature, 1930-Present)
    • 463 (Writers in African American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 517 (Studies in African American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 520 (Studies in American Indian Literature: Subtitle)
    • 521 (Studies in Ethnic Minority Literature: Subtitle)
    • 523 (Studies in U.S. Latino/a Literature: Subtitle)
    • 524 (Studies in Asian American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 631 (Seminar in African American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 632 (Seminar in American Indian Literature: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in women’s literature or gender studies selected from English:
    • 465 (Women Writers: Subtitle)
    • 628 (Seminar in Literature by Women: Subtitle)
    • 629 (Seminar in Literature and Sexuality: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in an upper-level English elective
  • 3 credits in a capstone seminar experience: English 633 (Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing: Subtitle) (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Total = 36 credits

Track C: Creative Writing

  • 3 credits in English 215 (Introduction to English Studies)
  • 3 credits selected from English:
    • 233 (Introduction to Creative Writing)
    • 234 (Writing Fiction: Structure and Technique)
    • 235 (Writing Poetry: Forms, Styles, Voices)
  • 6 credits selected from English:
    • 305 (Survey of English Literature: 1900 to the Present)
    • 308 (Survey of American Literature: 1865-1965)
    • 309 (Survey of Contemporary American Literature)
    • 325 (The Art of Fiction: Subtitle)
    • 326 (The Development of the Novel: Subtitle)
    • 327 (The Development of the Short Story: Subtitle)
    • 328 (Forms of Experimental Literature: Subtitle)
    • 360 (The Art of Poetry: Subtitle)
    • 361 (The Development of Poetry: Subtitle)
    • 378 (Survey of Current Literary and Cultural Theory)
    • 417 (Readings for Writers: Subtitle)
    • 515 (Literature and the Other Arts: Subtitle)
  • 9 credits selected from English:
    • 414 (Special Topics in Creative Writing: Subtitle)
    • 415 (Fiction Workshop)
    • 416 (Poetry Workshop)
    • 611 (The Writer and the Current Literary Scene)
    • 612 (Poetry and the Creative Process)

PLEASE NOTE: In order to register for the English 615 or 616 capstone (see below), students must have completed successfully two 400-level workshops (English 414, 415, 416) as follows:

  • Prerequisites for English 615 fiction capstone: English 415 and one of the following: a second section of English 415 or English 414 or 416.
  • Prerequisites for English 616 poetry capstone: English 416 and one of the following: a second section of English 416 or English 414 or 415.

Students may not take the two required 400-level workshops in the same semester, and they may not take either of them concurrently with English 615/616.

  • 3 credits from pre-1800 literature selected from English:
    • 301 (Survey of English Literature: Beginnings to 1500)
    • 302 (Survey of English Literature: 1500-1600)
    • 303 (Survey of English Literature: 1600-1798)
    • 451 (Chaucer)
    • 452 (Shakespeare)
    • 454 (Milton)
    • 455 (Writers in Drama: Subtitle)
    • 456 (Writers in English Literature, 1500-1660: Subtitle)
    • 457 (Writers in English Literature, 1660-1798: Subtitle)
    • 500 (Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature: Subtitle)
    • 501 (Studies in Literature, 1500-1660: Subtitle)
    • 504 (Studies in Literature, 1660-1800: Subtitle)
    • 530 (Studies in Shakespeare: Subtitle)
  • 6 credits selected from English:
    • 301 (Survey of English Literature: Beginnings to 1500)
    • 302 (Survey of English Literature: 1500-1600)
    • 303 (Survey of English Literature: 1600-1798)
    • 304 (Survey of English Literature: 1798-1900)
    • 451 (Chaucer)
    • 454 (Milton)
    • 455 (Writers in Drama: Subtitle)
    • 456 (Writers in English Literature, 1500-1660: Subtitle)
    • 457 (Writers in English Literature, 1660-1798: Subtitle)
    • 458 (Writers in English Literature, 1798-1900: Subtitle)
    • 500 (Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature: Subtitle)
    • 501 (Studies in Literature, 1500-1660: Subtitle)
    • 504 (Studies in Literature, 1660-1800: Subtitle)
    • 505 Studies in Literature, (1800-1900: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in an upper-level English elective
  • 3 credits in a capstone experience selected from English 615 (Advanced Workshop in Fiction) or 616 (Advanced Workshop in Poetry) (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Total = 36 credits

Track D: English Language and Linguistics - At this time, students are not being admitted to this track.

Track E: Literature, Culture, and Media - At this time, students are not being admitted to this track.

Track F: Literature and Language Studies
(Completing this option alone does not satisfy the requirements for teaching certification. For certification requirements, see the School of Education section of this catalog.)

  • 3 credits in English 215 (Introduction to English Studies)
  • 3 credits selected from English:
    • 201 (Strategies for Academic Writing)
    • 208 (Writing and Research)
  • 6 credits in advanced writing courses selected from English:
    • 430 (Advanced Writing Workshop)
    • 440 (Introduction to Peer Tutoring and Practice)
    • 445 (The Composing Process)
  • 3 credits in advanced language and linguistics courses selected from English/Linguis:
    • 400 (Introduction to English Linguistics)
    • 401 (History of the English Language)
    • 403 (Survey of Modern English Grammar)
    • 404 (Language, Power, and Identity)
    • 350 (Introduction to Linguistics)
  • 3 credits in literature surveys (English 301-309)
  • 3 credits in genre courses selected from English:
    • 326 (The Development of the Novel: Subtitle)
    • 327 (The Development of the Short Story: Subtitle)
    • 328 (Forms of Experimental Literature: Subtitle)
    • 329 (Film and Literature: Subtitle)
    • 341 (The Development of Drama: Subtitle)
    • 361 (The Development of Poetry: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in focus courses selected from English:
    • 451 (Chaucer)
    • 452 (Shakespeare)
    • 454 (Milton)
    • 456 (Writers in English Literature, 1500-1660: Subtitle)
    • 457 (Writers in English Literature, 1660-1798: Subtitle)
    • 458 (Writers in English Literature, 1798-1900: Subtitle)
    • 459 (Writers in English Literature, 1900-Present: Subtitle)
    • 460 (Writers in American Literature, 1800-1900: Subtitle)
    • 461 (Writers in American Literature, 1900-Present: Subtitle)
    • 465 (Women Writers: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in literature and culture surveys selected from English:
    • 372 (Survey of American Indian Literature)
    • 373 (Survey of Ethnic Minority Literature)
    • 374 (Survey of U.S. Latino/a Literature)
    • 375 (Survey of Asian American Literature)
    • 376 (Survey of African American Literature to 1930)
    • 377 (Survey of African American Literature, 1930-Present)
    • 381 (World Literatures Written in English: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in critical theory selected from English:
    • 378 (Survey of Current Literary and Cultural Theory)
    • 545 (Studies in the History of Literary Criticism: Subtitle)
    • 547 (Studies in Theory and Criticism: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in historical concentration courses selected from English:
    • 501 (Studies in Literature, 1500-1660: Subtitle)
    • 504 (Studies in Literature, 1660-1800: Subtitle)
    • 505 (Studies in Literature, 1800-1900: Subtitle)
    • 507 (Studies in Literature, 1900-Present: Subtitle)
    • 530 (Studies in Shakespeare: Subtitle)
    • 621 (Seminar in the Literature of England: Subtitle)
    • 623 (Seminar in American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 624 (Seminar in Modern Literature: Subtitle)
    • 627 (Seminar in Literature and Culture: Subtitle)
    • 685 (Honors Seminar: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in literature and culture concentration courses selected from English:
    • 514 (Literature in Context: Subtitle)
    • 515 (Literature and the Other Arts: Subtitle)
    • 517 (Studies in African American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 518 (Studies in Irish Literature: Subtitle)
    • 519 (Studies in Irish American Literature: Subtitle)
    • 520 (Studies in American Indian Literature: Subtitle)
    • 521 (Studies in Ethnic Minority Literature: Subtitle)
    • 523 (Studies in U.S. Latino/a Literature: Subtitle)
    • 524 (Studies in Asian American Literature: Subtitle)
  • 3 credits in a capstone seminar experience selected from English 620-632 (if not completed as historical concentration course)

Total = 36-39 credits

Track G: Professional and Technical Writing

General English Requirements

  • 3 credits in English 215 (Introduction to English Studies)
  • 6 credits in English courses outside of Track G (i.e., literature, rhetoric, creative writing, or film and media studies)

Professional and Technical Communications Core Courses

  • 3 credits in English 439 (Information Design)
  • 6 credits selected from any of the following:
    • English 426 (Professional and Technical Communications Research)
    • English 435 (Professional and Technical Communications)
    • English 448 (Technical Communications Theory and Practice)
  • 3 credits in English 449 (Writing Internship in English) (satisfies L&S research requirement)
  • 3 credits in English 600-level seminar

Professional and Technical Communications Practice

  • 12 credits selected from any of the following:
    • 3 credits maximum selected from English 205, 206, 207, or 214
    • English 426 (Professional and Technical Communications Research)
    • English 431 (Topics in Advanced Communications: Subtitle)
    • English 433 (Creative Nonfiction)
    • English 434 (Editing and Publishing)
    • English 435 (Professional and Technical Communications)
    • English 436 (Technical Documentation)
    • English 437 (Project Management)
    • English 443 (Grant Writing)
    • English 444 (Technical Writing)
    • English 448 (Technical Communications Theory and Practice)
  • 6 credits in English electives outside of Track E (Literature, Rhetoric & Composition, Creative Writing, or Media, Cinema and Digital Studies)

Total = 36 credits

Track H: Media, Cinema, and Digital Studies

  • 3 credits in English 215 (Introduction to English Studies)
  • 6 credits selected from the following:
    • English 290 (Introduction to Film Studies)
    • English 291 (Introduction to Television Studies)
    • English 294 (Game Culture)
  • 3 credits in writing or literature, selected from English 301-309, 325-328, 332-379, 381, 404, 414-423, 425-438, 447, 451-547
  • 15 credits in media, cinema, and digital studies, including at least 3 credits from each area selected from the following and no more than 3 credits in 200-level courses:


    Media

    • English/FilmStd 286 (Writing About Film and Television)
    • English/FilmStd 291 (Introduction to Television Studies) (if not selected above)
    • English/FilmStd 293 (Literature and Media: Subtitle)
    • English/FilmStd 380 (Media and Society: Subtitle)
    • English/FilmStd 391 (Television Criticism and Theory)
    • English/FilmStd 394 (Theories of Mass Culture: Subtitle)
    • English 414 (Special Topics in Creative Writing: “Zines and Self-Publishing” subtitle
    • English 431 (Topics in Advanced Communications: with appropriate subtitle) (Contact Track H coordinator.)
    • FilmStd 212 (Intermediate Topics in Film Studies: with appropriate subtitle)


    Cinema

    • English/FilmStd 286 (Writing About Film and Television)
    • English/FilmStd 290 (Introduction to Film Studies) (if not selected above)
    • English/FilmStd 295 (Women and Film)
    • English/FilmStd 312 (Topics in Film Studies: Subtitle)
    • English/FilmStd 316 (World Cinema: Subtitle)
    • English/FilmStd 320 (Studies in Film Authorship: Subtitle)
    • English/FilmStd 329 (Film and Literature)
    • English/FilmStd 383 (Cinema and Genre: Subtitle)
    • English/FilmStd 390 (Classical Film Criticism and Theory)
    • English 414 (Special Topics in Creative Writing: “Screenwriting – Story/Structure” subtitle)
    • FilmStd 212 (Intermediate Topics in Film Studies: with appropriate subtitle)
    • FilmStd/Jewish 350 (Global Jewish Film and Television: Subtitle)
    • FilmStd 412 (Global Cinemas – Cinematic Practices in the Context of Globalization: Subtitle)
    • FilmStd 669 (Screening Sexuality: Subtitle)
    • FilmStd 690 (Seminar in Contemporary Film Theory) (if not selected as capstone)


    Digital Studies

    • English 294 (Game Culture) (if not selected above)
    • English/FilmStd 312 (Topics in Film Studies: Cinema and Digital Studies subtitle)
    • English 414 (Special Topics in Creative Writing: “Animated Texts” subtitle)
    • English 436 (Technical Documentation)
    • English 515 (Literature and the Other Arts: ”From Dada to the Web” subtitle)
    • FilmStd 212 (Intermediate Topics in Film Studies: with appropriate subtitle)
  • 6 credits in upper-level electives
  • 3 credits in capstone seminar experience: FilmStd 690 (satisfies L&S research requirement)

Total = 36 credits

Honors in the Major

English majors need to meet the following three criteria in order to graduate with Honors in the Major:
1. Minimum 3.000 cumulative GPA on all UWM graded credits attempted;
2. Minimum 3.500 GPA on all credits attempted that count toward the major; and
3. Minimum 3.500 GPA on all advanced (300+) credits that count toward the major.

Course of Study: Minor

The minor in English requires English 215 (Introduction to English Studies) and a minimum of 15 credits in English courses numbered 300 and above (at least 9 taken in residence at UWM) including at least one of the following: 451 (Chaucer), 452 (Shakespeare), 454 (Milton), or 530 (Studies in Shakespeare: [Subtitle]). Students must complete at least 9 upper-division (numbered 300 and above) credits in the minor in residence at UWM. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA on all credits in the minor attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor credits attempted, including any transfer work.

For the teaching major and minor, see the School of Education section of this catalog.

Courses

English (ENGLISH)

English as a Second Language (ESL)

Cross-listed Courses

The following courses offered by other departments may be used to fulfill the requirements of the undergraduate major or minor in English:

Commun 300

Interviews and Interviewing

Commun 313

Human Communication and Technology

Commun 410

Organizational Communication Technology

JMC 306

Feature and Magazine Article Writing

JMC 562

Media Studies and Culture

Theatre 359

Playwriting I

Related Courses
The following courses offered by other departments may be of interest to students in English but may not be used to fulfill the requirements of the undergraduate major or minor in English:

Commun 105

Business and Professional Communication

JMC 201

Media Writing

JMC 231

Publication Design


Faculty

Gerald J. Alred, Prof. Emeritus, MA

Sukanya Banerjee, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Riverside

F. Xavier Baron, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Kimberly M. Blaeser, Prof., PhD
University of Notre Dame

Gilberto M. Blasini, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Los Angeles
Director, Film Studies

Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Prof., PhD
University of Washington

Marcus P. Bullock, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Liam Callanan, Assoc. Prof., MFA
George Mason University

Brenda Cárdenas, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

David Clark, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Iowa State University
Associate Dean, Humanities

George Clark, Prof., PhD
Florida State University

Rebecca Dunham, Prof., PhD
University of Missouri

J. Denny Fischer, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois

Jane A. Gallop, Distinguished Prof., PhD
Cornell University

Alice M. Gillam, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD

John A. Goulet, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Scott Graham, Asst. Prof., PhD
Iowa State University

Sandra Grayson, Prof., PhD
University of California, Riverside

Richard Grusin, Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Director, Center for 21st Century Studies

J. Lane Hall, Prof., MFA
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Kristie G. Hamilton, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Texas at Austin
Director, Masters in Liberal Studies Program

Ihab H. Hassan, Vilas Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Gregory S. Jay, Prof., PhD
State University of New York at Buffalo

Barrett Kalter, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Rutgers University

William Keith, Prof., PhD
University of Texas

Gwynne Kennedy, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pennsylvania

Maurice Kilwein-Guevara, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Andrew F. Kincaid, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota

James M. Kuist, Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Valerie Laken, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Josepha Lanters, Prof., PhD
University of Leiden, The Netherlands

Dennis Lynch, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley

Andrew V. Martin, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Iowa

Theodore Martin, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley

Patricia Mayes, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Santa Barbara

Annie McClanahan, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley

Margaret Mika, Sr. Lect., MA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Stuart Moulthrop, Prof., PhD
Yale University

Jane B. Nardin, Prof. Emerita, PhD

Mark Netzloff, Assoc. Prof., PhD, Chair
University of Delaware

Margaret Noodin, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota

Tasha G. Oren, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Patrice S. Petro, Prof., PhD
University of Iowa
Vice Provost for International Education and Director, Center for International Education

Jason Puskar, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Harvard University

Peter Sands, Assoc. Prof., PhD, JD
Binghamton University, SUNY
Director, UWM Honors College

Kumkum Sangari, Prof., PhD
University of Leeds
Vilas Professor of English and the Humanities

Charles I. Schuster, Prof., PhD
University of Iowa

Rachel Spilka, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Carnegie Mellon University

Bruce R. Stark, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD

Jocelyn Szczepaniak-Gillece, Asst. Prof., PhD
Northwestern University

William V. Van Pelt, Assoc. Prof, PhD
University of California, Santa Cruz

Carolyn Washburn, Sr. Lect., MSW
University of Pennsylvania

Tami Williams, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Los Angeles

Michael Wilson, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Cornell University

Anne Wysocki, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Michigan Technological University



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