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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014


College of Letters and Science


Physics


The principles of physics provide the underpinnings for many of the scientific and technological advances of the last several decades. Because of this, physics course work is taken by students majoring in virtually every scientifically-based field, e.g., engineering, nursing, architecture, pre-medicine, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, meteorology, etc. Students in other fields take less comprehensive physics or astronomy courses in order to attain basic scientific literacy. The operational use of mathematics in the 100- and 200-level courses is indicated by the prerequisite math placement level.

Among the less comprehensive courses is Physics 100, a course for students who feel a need for additional preparation before taking a required physics course. Other topical courses include Astronomy 103, Physics 107, Physics 109, and Physics 133. There also are occasional one-time course offerings of this nature. They will be listed in class schedules and on bulletin boards when they are offered. Physics 110 is designed for students in the health sciences. Physics 120 and 122 are non-calculus introductory physics courses. Optional laboratories for these courses are Physics 121 and 123. Astronomy 175 and Physics 185 are courses for elementary teachers. Students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science take Physics 209 and 210; they also should consider taking Physics 309.

Physics 209, 210, 214, 215, and 309 are appropriate for students majoring in the sciences. These courses are recommended strongly for all students who plan to take any courses beyond the general physics level. Physics 120/121 and 209/214 treat similar subject matter but with different degrees of mathematical sophistication. Any combination of these courses carries a maximum of 5 credits towards graduation. Similarly, Physics 122/123 and 210/215 treat similar subject matter but with different degrees of mathematical sophistication. Any combination of these courses carries a maximum of 5 credits toward graduation.

At the advanced undergraduate level the Department of Physics offers instruction in the classical and modern fields of physics. Experimental research facilities are available in the areas of condensed matter, surface science, biophysics, and optics. Theoretical studies are conducted in relativity and cosmology, high energy physics, biophysics, medical imaging, and condensed matter physics. Joint study with other departments also can be arranged.

Course of Study: Major

Freshmen who enter with scores of 4 or 5 on the Physics Advanced Placement exam given by CEEB are given partial credit for the introductory courses.

Students who have a combined GPA of 2.5 or above in all mathematics and physics courses taken in the first two years will be approved for a major in physics. This requirement will be waived in those cases where students are able to show evidence of unusual circumstances.

The department offers two study options. The standard physics major is for students who seek a general physics degree. The physics major with astronomy emphasis is for students who wish to pursue their interest in astronomy. While the standard physics major generally is followed by students who plan to go on to graduate school, the major with astronomy emphasis also enables students to pursue graduate work in physics.

Both options require that students take at least 15 credits in advanced-level (numbered 300 and above) courses in residence at UWM. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA on all credits in the major attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all major credits attempted, including any transfer work. All students in the College are required to complete a research experience in their majors. Physics majors meet this requirement by successfully completing one of the following upper-level, 3-credit laboratory courses:

Physics 406

Introduction to Infrared Microspectroscopy

Physics 408

Experiments in Linear Electronics

Physics 409

Modern Physics Laboratory

Physics 410

Optics Laboratory

 

Physics 670

Electron Microscopy Laboratory

or    
Physics 391

Undergraduate Research Participation
The research proposal must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the Departmental Undergraduate Committee; it must demonstrate clear pedagogical value. Unfocused laboratory internships are not acceptable.

 

Students who intend to double-major in physics and engineering may substitute some specific engineering courses for required physics courses. See the list of possible substitutes below, following the requirements for the major with astronomy emphasis.

Standard Physics Major

A minimum of 41 credits in physics, of which 15 must be taken in advanced-level (numbered 300 and above) courses in residence at UWM, are required, including:

a. Two semesters of calculus-based introductory physics

Physics 209

Physics I (Calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 214

Lab Physics I (Calculus Treatment)

1

Physics 210

Physics II (Calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 215

Lab Physics II (Calculus Treatment)

1

b. Physics 309

Physics III: Modern Physics

3

c. Physics 270

Introduction to Computational Physics

3

or

   

Physics 370

Computational Physics

3

d. Physics 317

Thermodynamics 3

e. One of the following advanced laboratory courses:
(Note: these courses are NOT offered every semester; check with the undergraduate advisor to plan for completing this requirement.)

Physics 406

Introduction to Infrared Microspectroscopy

3

Physics 408

Experiments in Linear Electronics 3
Physics 409 Modern Physics Laboratory 3

Physics 410

Optics Laboratory 3

Physics 670

Electron Microscopy Laboratory 3
or    
Physics 391

Undergraduate Research Participation
The research proposal must be approved by the undergraduate advisor and the Departmental Undergraduate Committee, and it must demonstrate pedagogical value. Unfocused laboratory internships are not acceptable.

 

f. Physics 411

Mechanics 4

g. Physics 420

Electricity and Magnetism I

3

h. Physics 422

Electricity and Magnetism II

3

i. Physics 441

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I 4

j. Physics 442

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics II 3
(Students who major in both physics and engineering are not required to take Physics 442; however, it is recommended strongly that they do so.)

Total: 39 credits

   

k. Electives from Physics or Astronomy courses 300 level or above, minimum 2 cr,
selected from the following list
:

Astron 300

Astronomy I

3

Astron 320

Astronomy II

3

Physics 305 (405)

Medical Physics

3

Physics 306

Introduction to Biophysics

3

Physics 325 Optics 3
Physics 370 Computational Physics (if not selected above) 3

Physics 391

Undergraduate Research Participation

1-6

Physics 406 Introduction to Infrared Microspectroscopy (if not selected above) 3

Physics 408

Experiments in Linear Electronics (if not selected above)

3

Physics 409

Modern Physics Laboratory (if not selected above)

3

Physics 410

Optics Laboratory (if not selected above)

3

Physics 515

Statistical Mechanics

3

Physics 517

Special Relativity

3

Physics 531

Principles of Quantum Mechanics I

3

Physics 532 Principles of Quantum Mechanics II 3

Physics 541

Elementary Particles

3

Physics 551

Introduction to Solid State Physics I

3

Physics 651

Introduction to Solid State Physics II

3

Physics 670

Electron Microscope Laboratory (if not selected above)

3


Physics Major with Astronomy Emphasis

a. Two semesters of calculus-based introductory physics

Physics 209

Physics I (Calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 214

Lab Physics I (Calculus Treatment)

1

Physics 210

Physics II (Calculus Treatment)

4

Physics 215

Lab Physics II (Calculus Treatment)

1

b. Physics 309 Physics III: Modern Physics 3

c. Physics 270

Inroduction to Computational Physics

3

or    
Physics 370 Computational Physics 3

d. Physics 317

Thermodynamics

3

e. Physics 325

Optics

3

f. Physics 410

Optics Laboratory

2

g. Physics 411

Mechanics

4

h. Physics 420

Electricity and Magnetism I

3

i. Physics 422 Electricity and Magentism II 3

j. Physics 441

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I

4

k. Physics 442 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics II 3

l. Astron 104

Astronomy Laboratory

1

m. Astron 300

Astronomy I

3

n. Astron 320

Astronomy II

3

o. 6 credits of electives from the following:

Astron 381

Honors Seminar: (Subtitle)

3

Atm Sci 110

The Origin, Composition, and Structure of Planetary Atmospheres

3

Geo Sci 120

Geology of the Planets

3

Physics 391

Undergraduate Research Participation

1-6

Physics 517

Special Relativity

3

Physics 541

Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics

3

Total

 

55


Students are advised strongly to take the following courses as part of their electives:

Chem 102

General Chemistry

5

Chem 104

General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis

5

Commun 103

Public Speaking

3

English 206

Technical Writing

3

Possible Course Substitutions for Students with Physics and Engineering Double Majors

One of the following courses may be substituted for Physics 270 or 370:

Civ Eng 280

Computer-Based Engineering Analysis

3

CompSci 151

Inroduction to Scientific Programming in Fortran

3

CompSci 201

Introductory Computer Programming

3

The following course my be substituted for Physics 317:

MechEng 301

Basic Engineering Thermodynamics

3

The combination of both Civ Eng 201 Statics, 3 cr., and 202 Dynamics, 3 cr., may substitute for Physics 411.

Students who major in both physics and engineering are not required to take Physics 442; however, it is recommended strongly that they do so.

Course of Study: Minor

A minor in physics requires 18 credits, of which 9 credits must be in courses at the 300-level or above taken in residence at UWM. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA on all credits in the minor attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor credits attempted, including any transfer work. There is latitude in the choice of credits. Students majoring in engineering or computer science should consider optics (Physics 325) and the optics lab (Physics 410), fundamentals of acoustics (Physics 511), and an appropriate short course (Physics 361). Science or math education majors should take thermodynamics (Physics 317), optics (Physics 325) and general astronomy (Astron 300). Math majors will find complementary subject matter in mechanics (Physics 411), electricity and magnetism (Physics 420 and 422), and special relativity (Physics 517). Students are required to consult with the physics advisor when planning their minor programs of study.

For the teaching minor, see the School of Education section of this catalog.

Courses (PHYSICS)

Faculty and Staff

Daniel Agterberg, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Toronto

Luis Anchordoqui, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina

Donald E. Beck, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Patrick Brady, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Alberta

Philip Chang, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Barbara

Yutze Chow, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Jean Creighton, Admin. Prog. Mgr., Ph.D.
University of Waterloo, Ontario

Jolien Creighton, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Waterloo, Ontario

Richard H. Dittman, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Dawn Erb, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
California Institute of Technology

John L. Friedman, Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Marija Gajardziska-Josifovska, Prof., Ph.D.
Arizona State University

Robert G. Greenler, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Prasanjit Guptasarma, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of Bombay, India

Carol Hirschmugl, Prof., Ph.D.
Yale University

David Kaplan, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
California Institute of Technology

Moises Levy, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Lian Li, Prof., Ph.D.
Arizona State University at Tempe

Elihu Lubkin, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Paul Lyman, Prof., Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Richmond B. McQuistan, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Abbas Ourmazd, Distinguished Prof., Ph.D.
Wolfson College, Oxford

Leonard E. Parker, Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Sarah Patch, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Valerica Raicu, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D., Chair
University of Bucharest, Romania

Dilano K. Saldin, Prof., Ph.D.
Oxford University

Bimal K. Sarma, Prof., Ph.D., Assoc. Chair
Northwestern University

Marius Schmidt, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Technical University of Munich

Xavier Siemens, Asst. Prof., Ph.D.
Tufts University

Dale R. Snider, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Richard S. Sorbello, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Raymond W. Suchy, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus

Shuk Yin Tong, Dist. Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

William L. Walters, Prof. Emeritus, Ph.D.

Michael Weinert, Distinguished Prof., Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Alan Wiseman, Assoc. Prof., Ph.D.
Washington University

Robert Wood, Senior Lect. and Adjunct Assoc. Prof., D. Phil.
Oxford University


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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014:
Physics
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