Archaeological Institute of America-Milwaukee Society

2016-2017 Lecture Series

All lectures are held on Sunday afternoons at 3:00 p.m. in Sabin Hall Room G90 on the UWM Campus (3413 North Downer, corner of Newport and Downer Avenues). On Sundays, parking is available in the Klotsche Center surface lot directly north of Sabin or on nearby streets.

All lectures are free and open to the public and followed by refreshments. They are co-sponsored by the Departments of Anthropology, Foreign Languages and Literature-Classics, and Art History at UW-Milwaukee.

Spring, 2017

Sunday, February 12, 2017, 3:00pm
Ömÿr Harmanşah, University of Illinois at Chicago
Title: Hittites, Water Cult and the Politics of Landscape in Bronze Age Anatolia


Sunday, March 5, 2017, 3:00pm
Jordan Karsten, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Title: Bones and Borscht: How Neolithic Human Remains from Ukraine Are Enabling the Reconstruction of European Population History


Saturday, April 8, 2017
Museums of Kenosha: A Day of Exploration
AIA Local Societies of the Midwest Spring Field Trip
Kenosha, Wisconsin


Sunday, April 23, 2017, 3:00pm
Carl Sheppard Memorial Lecture
Pam Crabtree, New York University
Title: The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England: Urbanism and state formation in Anglo-Saxon England


Fall, 2016

Sunday, September 25, 2016 3:00pm
Bronwen L. Wickkiser, Wabash College, Indiana
Title: Healing, Space, and Musical Performance in Late Classical Greece: The Thymele at Epidauros

Sunday, November 13, 2016, 3:00pm
Joukowsky Lecture
Neil A. Silberman, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Title: Rebooting Antiquity How Holy Wars, Media Hype, and Digital Technology Are Changing the face of 21st Century Archaeology

Sunday, December 4, 2016, 3:00pm
David Pacifico, Director – Casma Hinterland Project
Title: Neighborhood Society Ancient and Modern


Lecture Descriptions - Fall 2016

September 25, 2015 3:00pm
Bronwen L. Wickkiser, Wabash College, Indiana
Title: Healing, Space, and Musical Performance in Late Classical Greece: The Thymele at Epidauros


Description: In the fourth century BCE, the citizens of Epidauros, a small polis in the Peloponnese, launched a massive building program at the nearby, much visited healing sanctuary of the god Asklepios, son of Apollo. In terms of labor, design, and expense, the most impressive and sophisticated structure belonging to this program was a mysterious round building located at the very center of the sanctuary, a building known from ancient sources as the thymele.


Since its excavation in the nineteenth century, archaeologists have proposed a wide range of interpretations for this building, such as that it was Asklepios's tomb, or a council house, a dining hall, an astronomical tool, or a library. A curious hole at the center of the thymele's floor opened into unique, labyrinthine foundations. This substructure has been interpreted as a well, an offering pit, a maze through which worshippers wandered like initiates in a mystery cult, or a residence for Asklepios's sacred snakes.

In this talk, we will explore another potential solution to the mystery of the thymele's form and function. I will suggest that this building served as a space for musical performance, and that this sacred music fulfilled a therapeutic role at the heart of Asklepios's most famous healing sanctuary.

Bronwen L. Wickkiser

Dr. Bronwen L. Wickkiser is the Theodore Bedrick Associate Professor of Classics at Wabash College in Indiana. Much of her research focuses on religion and medicine in Greek and Roman antiquity, especially as evident in the cult of the healing god Asklepios. Wickkiser's first book, Asklepios, Medicine, and the Politics of Healing in Fifth-Century Greece (Johns Hopkins 2008) argues that medical and political factors together fueled the cult's rapid rise in popularity as worshippers sought a capable healer for the body politic as well as the physical body. A new project explores references to the classical past in the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery and the complex relationships between religious and civil liberty in our nation's not too distant, classically leaning past. Wickkiser is the recipient of numerous fellowships from institutions such as the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

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Sunday, November 13, 2016, 3:00pm
Joukowsky Lecture
Neil A. Silberman, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Title: Rebooting Antiquity How Holy Wars, Media Hype, and Digital Technology Are Changing the face of 21st Century Archaeology

Description: There's a revolution happening today in the way we value, discover, and imagine the past. On the negative side, ancient sites by the thousands—not only in the Middle East but all over the world—are being bulldozed, looted, vandalized, or blown up. Feature films, bestsellers and specialized cable documentaries hopelessly muddle archaeological fiction and fact. Yet on the positive side, advanced satellite imagery and LIDAR sensors are uncovering complex civilizations in deserts and jungles where none were assumed ever to exist. Virtual reality environments and 3D digital reconstructions are now used both for scientific documentation and immersive museum experiences. And the sheer social reach of Facebook, Twitter, and research-by-crowdsourcing is offering archaeologists unprecedented opportunities to engage the public in their work. This illustrated lecture will highlight some recent discoveries and ongoing controversies in the Americas, Europe, and Asia that exemplify the dramatic new directions that archaeology is taking in our globalized, internet age.

Neil A. Silberman

Neil A. Silberman is an author and heritage interpretation professional with a special interest in emerging trends and techniques for public engagement. He has served in various capacities for ICOMOS (the International Council on Monuments and Sites) and other archaeological conservation organizations, and is currently a managing partner of Coherit Associates, an international consultancy specializing in public heritage programs. His books and edited volumes include: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology (2012); The Future of Heritage (2008); and Who Owns the Past? (2007). In 2008 he joined the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and became one of the founders of its Center for Heritage and Society.

Neil Silberman will be giving a Joukowsky Lecture, named for Martha Sharp Joukowsky, past President of the Archaeological Institute of America and Professor of Old World Archaeology at Brown University. The Joukowsky Lectureship is part of the AIA's National Lecture Program.

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Sunday, December 4, 2016, 3:00pm
David Pacifico, Director – Casma Hinterland Project
Title: Neighborhood Society Ancient and Modern

David Pacifico

Description: Dr. David Pacifico presents his research on ancient urban neighborhoods in Peru and compares them with the society and cultures of modern urban neighborhoods. Specifically, this lecture details social diversity, urban economies, and politics in a commoner neighborhood at El Purgatorio, capital of the Casma culture in 13th century Peru. From the capital, the lecture moves outward to present preliminary findings from ongoing research on hinterland communities around El Purgatorio. Finally, David explores the meaning of these findings with respect to our understanding of modern urban neighborhoods and cultures.

Dr. David Pacifico is an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the Andean region of South America. His research focuses on food, ritual, and economy in ancient neighborhoods. David is director of the Casma Hinterland Project and editor of two forthcoming volumes on the archaeology of households and neighborhoods. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and is newly a resident of Milwaukee's North Shore.

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Lecture Descriptions - Spring 2017


Sunday, February 12, 2017, 3:00pm
Ömÿr Harmanşah, University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Hittites, Water Cult and the Politics of Landscape in Bronze Age Anatolia


Description: Earthen dams, stone lined water reservoirs and stone built sacred pool monuments constitute some of the most vibrant landscape features in the Hittite world during the Late Bronze Age in Central Anatolia (ca. 1400-1175 BCE). Such water monuments materialize in various architectural forms and building technologies and constitute important elements of both urban and rural infrastructures, while they also serve as sites of ritual interaction with the Underworld, the mythical subterranean world where certain divinities and dead ancestors reside. Since 2010, Yalburt Yaylasi Archaeological Landscape Research project has been investigating the long term history of the borderland region in the vicinity of two imperial Hittite water monuments of Tudhaliya IV (1237-1209 BCE) in west-central Turkey: a sacred pool complex at the site of Yalburt Yaylasi and the earthen dam of Koyutolu Yayla. Both of these sites revealed monumental inscriptions in Hieroglyphic Luwian, and suggest a comprehensive program of water management and monumentalization of sacred springs in the region. The preliminary results of the systematic regional survey in the region suggests an intensified settlement at the time of their construction. This paper will discuss the politics of landscape between imperial politics and local identity, and especially the ritualized politics of water at the time of the last few centuries of the Hittite Empire, just prior to its collapse in the early 12th century BCE.

Ömÿr Harmanşah is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago's School of Art and Art History. He is an archaeologist and architectural historian specializing in the Ancient Near East. His work focuses on cities, the production of architectural space, critical studies of place and landscape, and imagemaking practices in the urban and rural environments. He is the author of two monographs, Cities and the Shaping of Memory in the Ancient Near East (Cambridge 2013) and Place Memory and Healing: An Archaeology of Anatolian Rock Monuments (Routledge 2015). His more recent work and teaching centers on the intersection between political ecology, new materialism, and the politics of heritage and archaeological practice in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has been directing the Yalburt Yaylas? Archaeological Landscape Project in west central Turkey, a regional survey project addressing questions of Hittite imperialism and borderlands.

http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/profiledetails/331/316

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Sunday, March 5, 2016, 3:00pm
Jordan Karsten, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Bones and Borscht: How Neolithic Human Remains from Ukraine Are Enabling the Reconstruction of European Population History

Verteba Cave, Ukraine

Jordan Karsten

Description: Recent developments in ancient DNA research have allowed archaeologists to reconstruct human migrations in ways that are reshaping the way we look at prehistory. One of the most remarkable aspects of this new research has been the recognition of a large-scale migration of nomadic pastoralists out of the Pontic-Caspian steppes at the close of the Neolithic and beginning of the early Bronze Age. Many archaeologists and paleogeneticists have gone so far as to suggest this massive movement of people was the mechanism that spread Indo-European languages and established modern European genetic signatures. However, this event remains imperfectly understood. For example, to what extent did Neolithic farmers who neighbored the steppe populations contribute genetically and culturally to this expansion? This question has been the focus of our research at Verteba Cave, Ukraine, one of the only known mortuary sites associated with the farmers of the Late Neolithic. The skeletal and genetic data we have collected from Verteba Cave are beginning to shed additional light on an extremely consequential time period in European population history.

Jordan Karsten is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. His research focuses on human osteology, evolution, and European prehistory. In addition to teaching, he also assists different Wisconsin law enforcement agencies with cases requiring skeletal analysis. Jordan earned his PhD in anthropology from the State University of New York at Albany in 2014.

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Saturday, April 8, 2017
Museums of Kenosha: A Day of Exploration
AIA Local Societies of the Midwest Spring Field Trip

On Saturday, April 8, 2017 the AIA-Milwaukee Society is organizing the first-ever gathering of neighboring AIA local societies from the Midwest. The highlight of the day will feature visits to two museums in Kenosha, Wisconsin-the Kenosha Public Museum (home of the Hebior and Schaeffer mammoth remains) and the Civil War Museum of Kenosha. The two museums are next door to each other and occupy a lovely setting on Lake Michigan near downtown Kenosha. There will be an option to visit the nearby Dinosaur Discovery Museum as well. Lunch will be provided thanks to the generosity of Dave Adam, Milwaukee Society Member and General Trustee on the AIA's Governing Board. The lunch break will give the members of participating Societies a time to socialize and get to know each other.

AIA members and their families from the following local societies are cordially invited: in Wisconsin: Milwaukee, Appleton, Madison; in Illinois: Rockford, Chicago, Western Illinois/Monmouth, Central Illinois/Urbana; in Indiana: Valparaiso; and in Michigan: Western Michigan/Grand Rapids.

Group entrance fee for the Kenosha Public Museum and Civil War Museum is $5.00 per person, each museum. Visits to the Dinosaur Discovery Museum are optional and individual admission is free ($2 donation suggested).

Since people will be coming from different directions we will drive to the museums. We will try to arrange car-pools for those who don't wish to drive. Parking is free.

For more information or to sign up please contact Jane Waldbaum, waldbaum@wi.rr.com

Museum Websites:
Kenosha Public Museum: http://www.kenosha.org/wp-museum/
Civil War Museum: http://www.kenosha.org/wp-civilwar/
Dinosaur Discovery Museum: http://www.kenosha.org/wp-dinosaur/

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Sunday, April 23, 2017, 3:00pm
Carl Sheppard Memorial Lecture
Pam Crabtree, New York University
The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England: Urbanism and state formation in Anglo-Saxon England

Pam Crabtree

Description: This lecture explores the archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England from the 5th to the 10th centuries CE. It examines the end of Roman Britain and the nature of the 5th and 6th century Early Anglo-Saxon settlements. It then explores the re-birth of urbanism in the late 7th century and the formation of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms between the 7th and the 10th centuries. The Anglo-Saxon sites of West Stow, Sutton Hoo, Brandon, Ipswich, Hamwic (Middle Anglo-Saxon Southampton), and Winchester will be discussed in detail.

Pam Crabtree is Associate Professor of Anthropology at New York University, and holds her degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (M.A. and Ph.D.) and Barnard College. Her fields of research are zooarchaeology, Medieval archaeology (in particular Anglo-Saxon archaeology), later Prehistoric Europe, Near Eastern archaeology and prehistory. She has published widely, and her current projects include Early Medieval Britain—The Rebirth of Towns in the Post-Roman West (Cambridge University Press, in preparation).

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