Archaeological Institute of America-Milwaukee Society

2015-2016 Lecture Series

All lectures are held on Sunday afternoons at 3:00 p.m. in Sabin Hall Room G90 on the UWM Campus (3413 North Downer, corner of Newport and Downer Avenues). On Sundays, parking is available in the Klotsche Center surface lot directly north of Sabin or on nearby streets.

All lectures are free and open to the public and followed by refreshments. They are co-sponsored by the Departments of Anthropology, Foreign Languages and Literature-Classics, and Art History at UW-Milwaukee.

Spring, 2016

Sunday, January 31, 2016, 3:00pm
Heather Walder, UW-La Crosse
Title: Chronology, Exchange, and Technology: New Insight on Intercultural Interaction in the Upper Great Lakes

Sunday, March 6, 2016, 3:00pm
Kevin Fisher, University of British Columbia
Title: The Urban Revolution on Aphrodite's Isle: Searching for Cyprus's Late Bronze Age Cities

Saturday, April 2, 2016, 9:30am-6:00pm
Exhibition: The Greeks from Agamemnon to Alexander the Great
Location: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago
Field Trip Flyer (pdf)

Sunday, April 17, 2015, 3:00pm
Michael Parker Pearson, University College London
Title: Stonehenge: New Discoveries


Fall, 2015

September 20, 2015 3:00pm
Mireille M. Lee, Vanderbilt University
Title: The Archaeology of Ancient Greek Dress

Saturday, October 17, 2015, 1:00-4:00pm
International Archaeology Day Celebration
See International Archaeology Day for details

Sunday, November 1, 2015, 3:00pm
John Hawks, Anthropology, UW-Madison
Title: The Rising Star Expedition and the Discovery of Homo naledi
Note - Change of Venue: Physics Building, Room 137, 1900 E. Kenwood Blvd., UWM Campus

Sunday, December 6, 2015, 3:00pm
Rachel Scott, Anthropology, DePaul University
Title: Warfare, Weapons and Skeletal Trauma in Early Medieval Ireland


Lecture Descriptions - Fall 2015

September 20, 2015 3:00pm
Mireille M. Lee, Vanderbilt University
Title: The Archaeology of Ancient Greek Dress


Description: Archaeology provides important evidence for ancient Greek dress, which was essential to the construction of social identities. Although no complete garments survive, preserved fragments of silk and embroideries indicate the elite status of the wearer. Jewelry, dress fasteners, toilet implements, perfume vessels, cosmetics, and mirrors are also important indicators of status and gender. The visual sources, including sculpture and vase-painting, depict men and women performing various dress practices. Although some practices, such as bathing and the use of perfumes, are common to both genders, others are specific to either men or women. The visual sources demonstrate other aspects of identity: age and social role are often indicated by hairstyle, whereas ethnicity is also conveyed by means of garments and body-modifications. Although dress is often considered a mundane aspect of culture, I argue that dress provides unique insight into ancient Greek ideologies.

Mireille Lee  

Dr. Mireille Lee is Assistant Professor with the Departments of History of Art and Classical Studies at Vanderbilt University, and holds her degrees from Bryn Mawr (Ph.D.) and Occidental College. Her research interests are Greek art and archaeology, in particular the construction of gender in ancient visual and material culture. She has published widely on the social functions of dress in ancient Greece, including her volume Body, Dress, and Identity in Ancient Greece (2015).

Return to the Top


Sunday, November 1, 2015, 3:00pm
John Hawks, Anthropology, UW-Madison
Title: The Rising Star Expedition and the Discovery of Homo naledi
Note - Change of Venue: Physics Building, Room 137, 1900 E. Kenwood Blvd., UWM Campus

Description: Prof. John Hawks will talk to us about recent discoveries that are shaping the knowledge of human origins. In 2013 he was part of a fieldwork team that recovered more than 1200 hominin specimens from the Rising Star cave system in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa, in an expedition led by Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand. Publication of the results of this excavation in September of 2015 notes the discovery of a new species of hominin, Homo naledi.


John Hawks

John Hawks is Associate Chair of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an associate member of both the Department of Zoology and the J. F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution, and a recent recipient of the UW's H. I. Romnes Faculty Fellowship and its Vilas Associate award. Prof. Hawks' research focuses on human evolution, especially changes in natural selection on human populations, and his scholarly contributions have been internationally recognized. He starred in the recent PBS series "First Humans" (http://video.pbs.org/program/first-peoples/).

For more about John Hawks:

For further reading:

  • http://news.wisc.edu/naledi/
  • Berger et al. 2015. Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa. eLife Vol. 4: e09560.
  • Dirks et al. 2015. Geological and taphonomic context for the new hominin species Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa. eLife Vol. 4: e09561.

Return to the Top


Sunday, December 6, 2015, 3:00pm
Rachel Scott, Anthropology, DePaul University
Title: Warfare, Weapons and Skeletal Trauma in Early Medieval Ireland

Description: The contemporary documents depict early medieval Ireland as a society continually at war. While the sagas glorify the exploits of the male warrior, the annals record occurrences of armed combat and countless acts of other violence. In contrast, the archaeological record and human remains yield little evidence of warfare. Excavations have uncovered only occasional weapons and dubious settlement defenses, and skeletal analyses have produced few cases of trauma caused by interpersonal violence. Dr. Scott's talk will explore the discrepancy between the various lines of evidence and illuminate the nature of warfare in early medieval Ireland. She will show that the main military activity was the hit-and-run cattle raid, which may not have required iron weapons or substantial defenses or have resulted in significant bodily injury. Yet by providing combat training for young men, enhancing the prestige of successful leaders, and supplying cows for procuring clients, the stealing of cattle played an important role in early Irish society.

Rachel Scott     Kells Market Cross

Rachel Scott is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at DePaul University. She holds degrees from the University of Chicago (B.A.), University College Dublin, Ireland (Higher Diploma in Celtic Archaeology), and the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.). Her research interests include human osteology and paleopathology, European archaeology, and anthropological and archaeological theory. More specifically, her work integrates human skeletal, archaeological, and historical data in order to examine the processes of identity formation and the social construction of disease in early and late medieval Ireland. Dr. Scott is currently involved in two field projects, as the director of a project on leper hospitals in late medieval Ireland and as the bioarchaeologist for the Irish Archaeology Field School's excavation at the Black Friary in Trim, Co. Meath.

For more information about Rachel Scott see:
http://las.depaul.edu/departments/anthropology/Faculty/Pages/rachel-scott.aspx

Return to the Top

Lecture Descriptions - Spring 2016


Sunday, January 31, 2016, 3:00pm
Dr. Heather Walder, UW-La Crosse
Chronology, Exchange, and Technology: New Insight on Intercultural Interaction in the Upper Great Lakes


Heather Walder

Description: Dr. Walder will discuss the introduction, exchange, and social implications of two complementary lines of evidence for intercultural interaction in the Upper Great Lakes region: reworked copper and brass objects and glass trade beads from 38 archaeological sites dated from around 1630 to 1730. Anthropological questions of regional interaction, technological continuity and change, long-distance trade and population mobility are the focus of her research, which has identified material correlates for the chronology and scope of socially-structured exchange networks that facilitated intercultural interaction.

Heather Walder is an anthropological archaeologist and honorary fellow in the Anthropology department for 2015-2016 at UW-Madison. She also works at the Mississippi Valley Archaeology Center in La Crosse, WI as a research associate. Her research focuses on intercultural interaction and exchange in colonial contexts and in the Upper Great Lakes region in particular.

Return to the Top



Sunday, March 6, 2016, 3:00pm
Dr. Kevin Fisher, University of British Columbia
The Urban Revolution on Aphrodite's Isle: Searching for Cyprus's Late Bronze Age Cities


Description: The Late Bronze Age (ca. 1650-1100 BCE) was a revolutionary period on the island of Cyprus as it transformed from a relatively isolated, village-based, and largely egalitarian society, to one characterized by a complex social hierarchy and extensive international relations. It also saw the emergence on the island of the historically-attested Kingdom of Alashiya, the major source of copper in the eastern Mediterranean. The Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments (KAMBE) Project is investigating the relationship between these profound changes and the "urban revolution" that saw the appearance of the island's first cities. The project uses remote sensing, excavation, and cutting-edge digital technologies to reveal and model the urban fabric of the sites of Kalavasos-Ayios Dhimitrios and Maroni-Vournes/Tsaroukkas in south-central Cyprus. This work provides important insights into the role of urban place-making in the emergence of new patterns of social interaction and the exercise of power. Dr. Fisher's presentation features the results of new field work at Kalavasos-Ayios Dhimitrios, a possible source of the famous Amarna letters written from the King of Alashiya to the Pharaoh Akhenaten in the 14th century BCE.

Kevin Fisher

Kevin Fisher is an anthropological archaeologist interested in the relationship between people and their built environments, urbanism and the social dynamics of ancient cities, and the application of digital technologies for recording, analyzing and visualizing archaeological phenomena. He received a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Toronto (2007). Since 2013 he has been an Assistant Professor of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology in the Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses mainly on the early complex societies of the eastern Mediterranean and Near East, especially Cyprus, although he's worked on projects in Greece, Jordan, Peru, Guatemala, the US and Canada. He's currently a co-director of the Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments (KAMBE) Project, an investigation of the relationship between urban landscapes, interaction and social change in Late Bronze Age Cyprus (c. 1700-1100 BCE).

For more about Kevin Fisher: http://cnrs.ubc.ca/people/kevin-fisher/ For Further Reading: http://kambe.cnrs.ubc.ca/

Return to the Top


Sunday, April 17, 2016, 3:00pm
Dr. Michael Parker Pearson, University College London
Stonehenge: New Discoveries

Description: Stonehenge is one of the great mysteries of the prehistoric world. After seven years of new excavations and research, archaeologists now have a completely new understanding of the date and purpose of this enigmatic monument. A key break-through has been to understand how Stonehenge formed part of a wider complex of monuments and landscape features within Salisbury Plain. Professor Parker Pearson will present the results of the Stonehenge Riverside Project, and discuss the current theories about Stonehenge - an astronomical observatory, a centre of healing or a place of the ancestors - and the identity of its Neolithic builders.

Stonehenge area

We now know much more about the people who built Stonehenge - where they came from, how they lived, and how they were organized. Not only has the project discovered a large settlement of many houses, thought to be for Stonehenge's builders, at the nearby henge enclosure of Durrington Walls, but it has also re-dated Stonehenge and investigated its surrounding monuments and sites, many of which were hitherto undated and unknown. This presentation will provide a brief overview of some of the project's highlights, including the recent discovery of Bluestonehenge. One of the greatest mysteries - why some of Stonehenge's stones were brought from 180 miles away - is currently being investigated and brand new results will be presented at the lecture.

Mike Parker Pearson

Mike Parker Pearson is Professor of British Later Prehistory with the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He holds his degrees from Cambridge University (Ph.D.) and the University of Southampton (B.A.); he is a past Inspector of Ancient Monuments for English Heritage. His research interests include Neolithic and Bronze Age Britain and Europe (particularly funerary analysis and the Beaker People), Madagascar and the Indian Ocean, and public archaeology and heritage. He is the Principal Investigator of a number of major research projects, including the Stonehenge Riverside Project (2004-2009) and the current Stones of Stonehenge Project. His recent publications include Stonehenge: exploring the greatest Stone Age mystery (2012). Professor Parker Pearson was an AIA Kress Lecturer for 2011/2012, and is the inaugural Kress Alumni Lecturer for 2015/2016.

For more about Mike Parker Pearson: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/staff/parker_pearson

For more about Stonehenge:

Return to the Top


Saturday, April 2, 2016, 9:30am-6:00pm
The Greeks from Agamemnon to Alexander the Great
Location: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago

This spring the AIA-Milwaukee is inviting you to join us on a trip to see the exhibit "The Greeks from Agamemnon to Alexander the Great" at the Field Museum in Chicago. This is a unique opportunity to see Greek objects on loan from Greece dating from the Neolithic age to the time of Alexander the Great. The trip is scheduled for Saturday, April 2. Please see the flyer for details and to register.

Field Trip Flyer (pdf)

If you want to join us, fill out the registration form on the flyer and bring it to the January 31 lecture with payment or mail it to our treasurer:

Professor Alice Kehoe
3014 N. Shepard Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211-3436

Return to the Top