Old World Archaeology Program

The primary focus of the Old World Archaeology Program is European archaeology, with an emphasis on Iron Age Celtic cultures. Professor Bettina Arnold, the Program Director, is ...

Field Project

The "Landscape of Ancestors" project directed by Professor Arnold in southwest Germany has provided experienced undergraduates and graduate students interested in Old World archaeology with an opportunity to participate in on-going excavations and analysis of material from sites in the vicinity of the early Iron Age Heuneburg hillfort, supported from 1999-2002 by the National Geographic Society. A study of ceramic material from the 1999-2000 excavations at Tumulus 17 has recently been completed (Schneider MS 2003) and there is the potential for other projects.

Project publications include the following:

2010 Eventful archaeology, the Heuneburg mud-brick wall and the early Iron Age of southwest Germany. In Douglas Bolender (ed.) Eventful Archaeologies, pp. 176-186. Buffalo: State University of New York Press.

2008. "Reading the body": Geschlechterdifferenz im Totenritual der frühen Eisenzeit. In Ulrich Veit, Beat Schweizer and Christoph Kümmel (eds), Köperinszenierung - Objektsammlung - Monumentalisierung: Totenritual und Grabkult in frühen Gesellschaften, pp. 375-395. Münster: Waxmann.

2006. Gender in mortuary ritual. In Sarah M. Nelson (ed.) Reader in Gender Archaeology, pp. 137-170. Walnut Creek: AltaMira.

2003 Untersuchungen an einem zweiten hallstattzeitlichen Grabhügel der Hohmichele-Gruppe im "Speckhau", Markung Heiligkreuztal, Gemeinde Altheim, Landkreis Biberach. Bettina Arnold, Matthew L. Murray und Seth A. Schneider. Archäologische Ausgrabungen in Baden-Württemberg 2002: 78-81.

2002 A landscape of ancestors in southwest Germany. Bettina Arnold and Matthew L. Murray. News & Notes. Antiquity 76(292): 321-322.

2002. A landscape of ancestors: the space and place of death in Iron Age West-Central Europe. In Helaine Silverman and David Small (eds), The Space and Place of Death, pp. 129-144. AP3A No. 11. Arlington: Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association.

2002. "Sein und Werden": Gender as Process in Mortuary Ritual. In Sarah Nelson and Myriam Rosen-Ayalon (eds), In Pursuit of Gender: Worldwide Archaeological Approaches, pp. 239-256. Walnut Creek: AltaMira Press.

2001 Abschließende Untersuchungen in einem hallstattzeitlichen Grabhügel der Hohmichele-Gruppe im "Speckhau", Markung Heiligkreuztal, Gemeinde Altheim, Landkreis Biberach. Bettina Arnold, Matthew L. Murray und Seth A. Schneider. Archäologische Ausgrabungen in Baden-Württemberg 2000: 67-70.

2000 Untersuchungen in einem hallstattzeitlichen Grabhügel der Hohmichele-Gruppe im "Speckhau", Markung Heiligkreuztal, Gemeinde Altheim, Landkreis Biberach. Bettina Arnold, Matthew L. Murray und Seth A. Schneider. Archäologische Ausgrabungen in Baden-Württemberg 1999: 64-67.

Student Thesis Projects

Collections-based research and analysis has been the focus of many student projects. Recent and on-going Masters and PhD thesis projects in Old World archaeology range from a study of ushabti figurines at the Milwaukee Public Museum and their significance in understanding temporal and regional variation in ancient Egypt to an analysis of soapstone vessels from the Byzantine/Islamic site of Ayla/Aila (Aqaba) in Jordan. Extensive collections from the Bronze Age site of Tell Hadidi in Syria, housed at the Milwaukee Public Museum, as well as other Old World collections there and at the Chicago Field Museum, have been the subject of several thesis projects and are available for future thesis work. Several graduate students have worked on projects relating to the Celtic cultures of the British Isles, including a study of changing gender configurations due to Romanization in the territory of the Durotriges as reflected in mortuary contexts in southern England. Two Masters theses have been completed on material from the Swiss Neolithic Lake Dwelling site of Robenhausen at the Milwaukee Public Museum (Lillis M.S. 2005; Johnson M.S. 2006), and two projects analyzing collections from the type-site of La Tène, Switzerland at the Logan Museum and the Chicago Field Museum were completed in 2008 (Farley/Logan; Kubicek/Field Museum). Current projects include the mortuary archaeology of Iron Age Cornwall and a statistical analysis of personal ornament in the Heuneburg mortuary landscape.

Resources

The Old World Archaeology Program has access to a portion of the Archaeology Research Lab for storing and laying out artifacts. A computer, printer, scanner, digital camera and other small electronic equipment are available for students working on projects to use. Software includes ArcView GIS and various database programs. The Old World Archaeology Program also has access to general Archaeology Lab equipment, including microscopes, darkroom facilities and computers, and to Department of Anthropology facilities and equipment.