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Beginning in August 2011, three campus retreats were held to identify and prioritize a series of action-oriented climate initiatives.

With the objective of making UWM "the best place to learn and work for students, faculty and staff," the UWM Best Place to Work Coordinating and Action & Leadership Teams have worked together over the 2011-12 academic year to develop and implement climate action plans.

Resources: Professional Leadership Development

Branham, Leigh, and Mark Hirschfeld. Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
In an eye-opening survey of 10,000 employers in 43 states, the Best Places to Work are not only the most engaging work environments for employees—they are also the most efficient, productive, and successful. Even in the toughest economic times.

Cabitza, Federico, and Carla Simone. "Affording Mechanisms: An Integrated View of Coordination and Knowledge Management." Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing, 21.2/3 (2012): 227-260.
In this paper we question the separation between technologies that support information and handle the ordered flow of work and technologies that support knowledge management. On the basis of observational studies and initiatives of participatory prototype design that we performed in the hospital domain and other cooperative work settings, the paper proposes a unified view of these high-level functionalities through the notion of Affording Mechanism.

Parker, Philip, Andrew Martin, Susan Colmar, and Gregory Liem. "Teacher’s Workplace Well-being: Exploring a Process Model of Goal Orientation, Coping Behavior, Engagement, and Burnout." Teaching & Teacher Education, 28.4 (2012): 503-513.
The current research integrated components of the transactional model of stress and coping with self-worth and goal theories to examine a model where (a) teachers' goal orientation (as indicated by mastery and failure avoidance) was hypothesized to predict their teaching coping strategies (as indicated by problem-and emotion-focused coping) and (b) teaching coping was hypothesized to predict occupational well-being (as indicated by engagement and burnout).

Nefer, Barbara (2008). “Don't be Delegation-Phobic.” SuperVision, 69(12), 19-21.
When you work your way up, you're used to doing things hands-on, and you have a wealth of practical knowledge. It can be very difficult to let go of that when you switch to a position where managing others is your primary responsibility. You must remind yourself– you are a supervisor now. A major part of your job is to get things done through your employees.

Buckingham, M., & Coffman, C. (1999). “First, Break all the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently.” New York: Simon & Schuster. < http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0684852861?ie=UTF8&tag=lstlmh01- 20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0684852861#_ >

Dittmer, R. E., & McFarland, S. (2007). In Walsh D. (Ed.). “151 Quick Ideas for Delegating and Decision Making.” Pompton Plains, NJ: Career Press. < http://www.amazon.com/Quick-Ideas-Delegating DecisionMaking/dp/ 1564149617/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337721861&sr=1-1>

“Delegation: Gaining Time for Yourself.” (2005). Harvard Business Essentials: Time Management (pp.18). Boston: Harvard Business Press.

“Making Decisions.” (2012). Leadership Excellence, 29(2), 9-9.
The article offers information and recommendations about decision making for leaders. Topics include decision-making overload for leaders, the benefits of delegating decisions to employees, and decision making for teams in the workplace. It is suggested that delegating decision-making will relieve pressure on leaders.

Earley, C. (2009). “Avoid Micromanaging.” Leadership Excellence, 26(6), 5-5.
The article offers tips on effective delegation of responsibilities and coaching in the corporate industry. Executives are advised to bring out the best knowledge and skills in their employees. Establishing relationships with employees to know their values, talents, aspirations, and experiences is deemed important.

Gary, L. (2004). “Performance Management that Drives Results.” Harvard Business Press Newsletters.

Pam Jones. (2012). “How to Delegate Successfully.” Public Finance, 42-43.
Every manager has to delegate, yet many people find it hard to do. Given the changes affecting the public sector, it is not surprising to find that delegation is a challenge. If you are working long hours, struggling to meet deadlines and feeling under pressure, it might be time to question your assumptions.

Schaffer, R. H. (1991). “Demand Better Results-and Get Them.” Harvard Business Review, 69(2), 142-149.
This HBR classic, first published in 1974, asks and answers one of management's most important questions: Why do so few organizations reach their productivity potential? The answer: because most senior executives fail to establish expectations of performance improvement in ways that get results. They fail because making heavy demands involves taking risks and threatens those who have the demands imposed on them.

Stanley, T. L. (2012). “Delegating for Success.” Supervision, 73(4), 7-10.
The article discusses the importance of delegating tasks within an organization and presents advice on doing so. The author describes the eight steps of effective delegating, ranging from selecting the task to delegate from praising the employee upon completion.

Wakeman, C. (2011). “Reality-Based Leaders.” Leadership Excellence, 28(9), 11-11.
The article offers guidance to help leaders delegate in order to maximize their time and develop employees for future greatness. Suggested actions that leaders must work on are to think about return on investment (ROI), to have a development plan, to tap into the strengths of others, and to delegate to other departments or project teams. Things that a leader should avoid are dumping, delegation of unprocessed work, micromanaging, confusion and frustration.

Youngwirth, J. (2010). “Guidelines for Good Delegation.” Journal of Financial Planning, 12-13.
The article offers guidelines for good delegation in businesses. They include delegation to the right person, provision training, provision of constructive feedback, and setting expectations. It notes that successful advisers put emphasis on responsibilities reflecting optimal use of passion and time.

Resources: Faculty and Staff Career Paths

Burkett, Linda, and Big Stone Gap, VA Mountain Empire Community Coll. Mountain Empire Community College Workplace Literacy Program. Final Evaluation Report. n.p.: 1993.
An evaluation of the Mountain Empire Community College workplace literacy program included interviews with representatives from three workplace partners who stated their support for skills training programs in workplace basics.

DuFour, Richard and Robert Eaker, and Rebecca DeFour. Revisiting Professional Learning Communities at Work: New Insights for Improving Schools. Bloomington: Solution Tree Press, 2008.
A merger of research and practice. It offers educators specific, practical recommendations for transforming their schools into PLCs so their students learn at higher levels and their profession becomes more rewarding, satisfying, and fulfilling.

Strange, C. Carney, and James H. Banning. Educating by Design: Creating Campus Learning Environments That Work. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Inc., 2001.
Carney Strange and Jim Banning provide theoretical grounding and practical tools to help us make educational environments more effective.

Resources: Parking

Shoup, Donald C. The High Cost of Free Parking. Chicago: American Planners Association, 2005.
In this no-holds-barred treatise, Shoup argues that free parking has contributed to auto dependence, rapid urban sprawl, extravagant energy use, and a host of other problems. Planners mandate free parking to alleviate congestion but end up distorting transportation choices, debasing urban design, damaging the economy, and degrading the environment.

Resources: Bullying and Cyber-bullying

Jones, Glen, Julian Weinrib, Amy Scott Metcalfe, Don Fisher, Kjell Rubenson, and Iain Snee. "Academic Work in Canada: The Perceptions of Early-Career Academics." Higher Education Quarterly, 66.2 (2012): 189-206.
This paper analyses junior academic staff's (assistant professors) perceptions of academic work in a highly decentralized Canadian 'system'.

Resources: Complaint Assistance

Branham, Leigh, and Mark Hirschfeld. Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
In an eye-opening survey of 10,000 employers in 43 states, the Best Places to Work are not only the most engaging work environments for employees—they are also the most efficient, productive, and successful. Even in the toughest economic times.

Resources: Conflict Resolution

Richard and Robert Eaker, and Rebecca DeFour. Revisiting Professional Learning Communities at Work: New Insights for Improving Schools. Bloomington: Solution Tree Press, 2008.
A merger of research and practice. It offers educators specific, practical recommendations for transforming their schools into PLCs so their students learn at higher levels and their profession becomes more rewarding, satisfying, and fulfilling.

Strange, C. Carney, and James H. Banning. Educating by Design: Creating Campus Learning Environments That Work. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Inc., 2001.
Carney Strange and Jim Banning provide theoretical grounding and practical tools to help us make educational environments more effective.

Resources: Design For UWM Code of Conduct

Lim, Vivien K.G, and Don J.Q Chen. "Cyberloafing at the Workplace: Gain or Drain on Work?" Behavior & Information Technology, 31.4 (2012): 343-353.
This study examined the impact of cyber-loafing on employees' emotion and work. We also examined gender differences in employees' perception towards cyber-loafing. In general, respondents felt that some form of cyber-loafing at work was acceptable.

Resources: Compensation and Benefits

Branham, Leigh, and Mark Hirschfeld. Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
In an eye-opening survey of 10,000 employers in 43 states, the Best Places to Work are not only the most engaging work environments for employees—they are also the most efficient, productive, and successful. Even in the toughest economic times.

Burchell, Michael, and Jennifer Robin. The Great Workplace: How to Build It, How to Keep It, and Why It Matters. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Inc., 2011.
The Great Place to Work Institute develops the annual ranking of the Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For. In this book, the authors explore the model of a Great Place to Work For- one that fosters employee trust, pride in what they do, and enjoyment in the people they work with.

Khosrovani, Masoomeh, and James Ward. "African Americans' Perceptions of Access to Workplace Opportunities: A Survey of Employees in Houston, Texas." Journal of Cultural Diversity, 18.4 (2011): 134-141.
Although increasing numbers of African Americans are employed in predominantly white organizations, anecdotal and scholarly evidence suggests that they still must overcome barriers to have similar career trajectories as their white counterparts. This study is motivated by other studies pertaining to racial discrimination and inequalities at the workplace as experienced by blacks.

Resources: Flexible Schedule/FMLA

"Balance Promotes Ethics?" T+D, 61.6 (2007): 16.
The article discusses the result of a survey conducted by Deloitte & Touche LLP concerning the relationship between work-life balance and the ethical conduct of employees in the workplace. The survey suggests that employers who want to improve ethical behavior in the office should offer employees a more flexible schedule.

Branham, Leigh, and Mark Hirschfeld. Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
In an eye-opening survey of 10,000 employers in 43 states, the Best Places to Work are not only the most engaging work environments for employees—they are also the most efficient, productive, and successful. Even in the toughest economic times.

Clark, Gordon. "From Corporatism to Public Utilities: Workplace Pensions in the 21st Century." Geographical Research, 50.1 (2012): 31-46.
For many Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries, workplace pensions have been an important mechanism for supplementing state- sponsored social security. Notwithstanding significant differences between developed economies in the significance attached to workplace pensions, provision has been typically encouraged through preferential tax policies on benefits and compensation packages.

Dowler, Denetta, Tatiana Solovieva, and Richard Walls. "Personal Assistance Services in the Workplace: A Literature Review." Disability and Health Journal, 2011, Vol.4(4), Pp.201-208, 4.4 (2011): 201-208.
Background Personal assistance services (PAS) can be valuable adjuncts to the complement of accommodations that support workers with disabilities. This literature review explored the professional literature on the use of PAS in the workplace.

Jang, Soo Jung. "The Relationships of Flexible Work Schedules, Workplace Support, Supervisory Support, Work-Life Balance, and the Well-Being of Working Parents." Journal of Social Service Research, 35.2 (2009): 93-104.
This study, using a secondary dataset from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, examines how working parents cope with work demands and family responsibilities. The design is a study on the relationships of flexible work schedule, workplace support, supervisory support, and work-life balance on the wellbeing of working parents employing the Structural Equation Model (SEM). In this study, employee wellbeing is an endogenous latent construct.

Resources: Improving Stress Levels and Wellbeing

Branham, Leigh, and Mark Hirschfeld. Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
In an eye-opening survey of 10,000 employers in 43 states, the Best Places to Work are not only the most engaging work environments for employees—they are also the most efficient, productive, and successful. Even in the toughest economic times.

Freda, Margaret Comerford. "Could Your Workplace Environment Improve?" MCN, the American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, 2004, Vol.29(4), Pp.214, 29.4(2004): 214.
Covers the topics: Maternal-Child Nursing -- standards; Nursing Staff, Hospital -- organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care -- organization & administration; Workplace – standards.

Fuller, B, MJ Simmering, LE Marler, SS Cox, RJ Bennett, and RA Cheramie. "Exploring Touch as a Positive Workplace Behavior." Human Relations, 2011, Vol.64(2), Pp.231-256, 64.2 (2011): 231-256.

Grosser, TJ, V Lopez-Kidwell, G Labianca, and L Ellwardt. "Hearing It Through the Grapevine: Positive and Negative Workplace Gossip." Organizational Dynamics, 2012, Vol.41(1), Pp.52-61, 41.1 (2012): 52-61.

Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica, David Glew, and Chockalingam Viswesvaran. "A Meta- analysis of Positive Humor in the Workplace." Journal of Managerial Psychology, 2012, Vol.27(2), P.155-190, 27.2 (2012): 155-190.

Parker, Philip, Andrew Martin, Susan Colmar, and Gregory Liem. "Teacher’s Workplace Well-being: Exploring a Process Model of Goal Orientation, Coping Behavior, Engagement, and Burnout." Teaching & Teacher Education, 28.4 (2012): 503-513.
The current research integrated components of the transactional model of stress and coping with self-worth and goal theories to examine a model where (a) teachers' goal orientation (as indicated by mastery and failure avoidance) was hypothesized to predict their teaching coping strategies (as indicated by problem- and emotion-focused coping) and (b) teaching coping was hypothesized to predict occupational well-being (as indicated by engagement and burnout).

Sias, Patricia, Erin Gallagher, Irina Kopaneva, and Hannah Pedersen. Work?" Behavior & Information Technology, 31.4 (2012): 343-353.
Workplace friendships are linked to many important processes and outcomes such as employee satisfaction, career development, creativity, and decision-making influence (Sias, 2009). Research has examined how workplace peer friendships develop and deteriorate, but largely ignored their maintenance.

Sutton, Robert I. The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t. New York: Warner Business Books, 2007.
Now using case studies from these and many more corporations that have had unquestioned success using variations of "The No Asshole Rule," Sutton's book aims to show managers that by hiring mean-spirited employees - regardless of talent - saps energy from everyone who must deal with said new hires.

Lim, Vivien K.G, and Don J.Q Chen. "Cyberloafing at the Workplace: Gain or Drain on Work?" Behaviour & Information Technology, 31.4 (2012): 343-353.
This study examined the impact of cyber-loafing on employees' emotion and work. We also examined gender differences in employees' perception towards cyber-loafing. In general, respondents felt that some form of cyber-loafing at work was acceptable.

Resources: Rewards

Branham, Leigh, and Mark Hirschfeld. Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
In an eye-opening survey of 10,000 employers in 43 states, the Best Places to Work are not only the most engaging work environments for employees—they are also the most efficient, productive, and successful. Even in the toughest economic times.

Medcof, John. "Total Rewards: Good Fit for Tech Workers." Research-Technology Management, 49, 5, 27-35(9), 49.5 (2006): 27-Technology.
Total rewards is a promising approach to rewards management that has been adopted by such technology-intensive firms as IBM, Microsoft, AstraZeneca, and Johnson & Johnson. Total rewards takes a holistic approach to rewards, going beyond the strong focus on pay and benefits which has been the hallmark of traditional compensation practice. Total rewards considers all the rewards available in the workplace, including opportunities for learning and development, and quality work environment.

Pearsall, Matthew J, Michael S Christian, and Aleksander P J Ellis. "Motivating Interdependent Teams: Individual Rewards, Shared Rewards, or Something in Between?." The Journal of Applied Psychology, 2010, Vol.95(1), Pp.183-91, 95.1 (2010): 183-191.
The primary purpose in this study was to extend theory and research regarding the motivational process in teams by examining the effects of hybrid rewards on team performance. Furthermore, to better understand the underlying team level mechanisms, the authors examined whether the hypothesized benefits of hybrid over shared and individual rewards were due to increased information allocation and reduced social loafing.