Upcoming Events & Announcements
Catherine Lutz
Catherine Lutz
(Anthropology, Brown University)
The United States has an all-volunteer military force, one that public opinion polls regularly show is the most respected institution in U.S. society. Nonetheless, numbers of those who enlist sooner or later say no to some or all of what they are asked to do, think, or represent. This has been especially so for those who participated in the war in Iraq, as it was for those who volunteered during the Vietnam War.

In this talk, Catherine Lutz (Anthropology, Brown University) explores that paradox, asking how and why those service members walk their path from yes to no. It explores the roots of both their volunteering and their objecting in the rhetoric of choice and in the masculine ideals to which they aspire.

Friday, February 24
3:30 pm, Curtin 175
Live video stream

Brown bag lunch seminar
Friday, February 24
12 noon Curtin 939
Reading: Catherine Lutz, "The U.S. Car Colossus and the Production of Inequality"



Camille Robcis
Camille Robcis
(History, Cornell University)
In this talk, Camille Robcis (History, Cornell) traces the history of institutional psychotherapy, a psychiatric reform movement born in France after World War II that had an important influence on many doctors and intellectuals, including Félix Guattari, Frantz Fanon, Georges Canguilhem, and Michel Foucault.

Anchored in Marxism and in Lacanian psychoanalysis, institutional psychotherapy advocated a radical transformation of the theory and practice of psychiatric care to ultimately revolutionize society. As the war, fascism, and colonialism had made clear, occupation was not just a physical condition: it was also a state of mind. To quote Foucault, fascism was not only a political system: it was also “in our heads,” what “causes us to love power, to desire the thing that dominates and exploits us.” In this process of psychic and political “dis-alienation,” these thinkers argued that psychiatry—and a politics of the psyche more generally—could play a key role.

Friday, March 10
3:30 pm, Curtin 175

Brown bag lunch seminar
Friday, March 10
12 noon Curtin 939
Reading: Camille Robcis, "The Biopolitics of Dignity" (PDF)
  • Facebook logo          Twitter logo          YouTube logo          Instagram logo          Instagram logo
  • postal address: p.o. box 413 milwaukee, wi 53201
  • street address: curtin hall 929 3243 n downer ave milwaukee, wi 53211
  • phone: 414.229.4141
  • fax: 414.229.5964
  • email: C21@uwm.edu