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CABHR
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
Helen Bader School of Social Welfare
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 786
Milwaukee, WI 53201
Contact Us:
Phone 414-229-5008
Fax 414-229-2872
cabhr@uwm.edu

Active Research Projects


Exploring and Preventing High Risk Drinking

Funding agency: MillerCoors and CABHR
Time period: Ongoing since September 2008
P.I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Director and Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: Conduct research on causes and correlates of high risk drinking; develop new measure of drinking related problems among college students; hold major public forum addressing prevention strategies with outside experts; developing coalitions with treatment providers and campus neighbors; develop website containing info about prevention strategies.

EPIDEMIOLOGY

"Stories to Tell Project" Etiology of Sexual Risk, Substance Abuse, and Trauma: A Bioecological Systems Model

Funding agency: NIH/NIDA
Time period: September 15, 2008-June 30, 2013
P.I.: Laura Otto-Salaj, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor
Co-P.I.: Susan Rose, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Mike Brondino, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: This prospective study will examine factors corresponding to the four levels of the Bioecological Systems Theory (BST) model as they relate to the interaction of sexual risk behavior, substance use, and violence in women of lower socioeconomic status. Further, we will also examine changes in their reports over six-month and 12-month intervals. The specific aims are: (1)To recruit 396 African American women between the ages of 18 and 45 living in urban housing developments in order to retain 375 participants; (2) To perform multiple assessments on factors pertaining to the levels of the BST model, as they relate to sexual risk, substance use, and trauma/victimization history; (3) To perform similar follow-up assessments with these participants six-months and 12-months following the first set of assessments; and (4) To analyze the above variables in relation to occurrence of occurrence and severity of sexual risk behavior, substance use, and IPV (either perpetrated or as a victim of) using structural equation modeling to examine application of variables related to Bronfenbrenner’s BST (1995) model. Findings from this research will provide important new information: (1) leading to greater insight of the dynamics and complexity of sexual risk behavior, substance use and trauma history in low income African American women; (2) needed to design interventions that attend to multiple risk issues in low income African American women; (3) needed to design effective strategies to prevent these issues from occurring; and (4) to evaluate the applicability and validity of BST to the context of low income African American women’s sexual risk behaviors, substance use, and trauma history.

SBIR, Hair Ethyl Glucuronide as a Long Term Alcohol Biomarker "Research on Undergraduate Student Health, (RUSH)"

Funding agency: Subaward from the United States Drug Testing Laboratories (NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) primary funder)
Time period: September 20, 2009 – August 21, 2011
Site P.I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Director and Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Lisa Berger, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: Collection of hair and fingernail samples in a random sample of college students in order to investigate the validity of a new biomarker for alcohol abuse/dependence. Biological specimens will be compared with self-reports using the Audit and the TLFB.

EVALUATION

Expanding Drug Court and Enhancing Recovery Options

Funding agency: Milwaukee County Behavioral Health/Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) primary funder)
Time period: October 1, 2009-September 30, 2012
Site P.I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Director and Professor, HBSSW
Site Co-P.I.: William Pelfrey, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, HBSSW

Purpose: To conduct a process evaluation of a new program that will expand options for arrestees participating in Milwaukee County’s Drug Treatment Court.

Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court

Funding agency: Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court (Bureau of Justice Administration (BJA) primary funder)
Time period: October 1, 2009-September 30, 2012
Site P.I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Director and Professor, HBSSW
Site Co-P.I.: William Pelfrey, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, HBSSW     

Purpose: To lead a process and performance evaluation of the Milwaukee County Circuit Court’s drug treatment court implementation. The grant supports both the program implementation and the evaluation.

Collaborative AODA Service: Identifying Cost-Effective Models

Funding agency: Subaward from the Jewish Family Services (University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health primary funder)
Time Period: December 1, 2009-November 30, 2010
Site P.I.: Lisa Berger, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: In collaboration with Jewish Family Services (JFS), assistant professor Lisa Berger received a subcontract award from JFS for the planning grant project titled “Collaborative AODA Service: Indentifying Cost-Effective Models” funded by the Wisconsin Partnership Project, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Hirsh Larkey Project Director. The project will examine the incorporation and sharing of AODA services among three community-based organizations that provide high-quality and affordable mental health care.

Western Wisconsin Collaborative for Children’s Safety and Permanency

Funding agency: Subaward from Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services (Administration for Children, Youth and Families primary funder)
Time period: January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012
Site P.I.: Joshua Mersky, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW
Site Co-P.I.: Susan Rose, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: Funded by the Administration for Children, Youth and Families, this study evaluates the effectiveness of the Western Collaborative for Children's Safety and Permanence (WCCSP). The WCCSP is an alliance of State, Regional, and County/Tribe-level partners who are committed to responding to the safety and permanency needs of children whose parents or caregivers abuse alcohol, methamphetamine, or other drugs.

INTERVENTION

Supporting Substance-abusing Incarcerated Mothers in Recovery and Family Reunification

Funding agency: Bureau of Justice Administration
Time Period: October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010
P.I.: Susan Rose, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Tom LeBel, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: the project, Keeping Families Together, is developing an “in reach” response to help meet the substance abuse and child welfare service needs of mothers in jail and as they transition to the community. The primary purpose of this project is to prevent re-occurring substance abuse by assisting incarcerated women in seeking substance abuse treatment upon release (thereby reducing recidivism), and assisting incarcerated mothers of minor children in re-establishing or initiating family reunification efforts upon re-entry into the community.

CLINICAL TRIAL

Acamprosate Treatment of Alcohol Dependence in a Family Medicine Setting: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

Funding agency: Subaward from Aurora Health Care (Forest Labs primary funder)
Time period: March 1, 2007 through August 31, 2010
Site P.I.: Lisa Berger, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: This pilot study is designed to determine the efficacy of acamprosate for alcohol dependence in a family medicine/primary care setting using a minimal psychotherapeutic intervention. The study is a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing 666 mg acamprosate t.i.d. (three times a day) to placebo in patients with alcohol dependence. This same study is being conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and the intention is to combine the data from the two sites. The lead Principal Investigator of this study is Dr. James C. Garbutt, Professor of Psychiatry at UNC.

Recently Completed Projects

EPIDEMIOLOGY

RO1, Secondary Analysis of Substance Abuse in Men

Funding agency: National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Time period: April 10, 2006 through January 30, 2010
P.I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Director and Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: A recent well-documented increase in the rate of new HIV infections in high risk populations coincide with the spreading popularity of club drugs such as MDMA, ketamine, GHB, and methamphetamine. CABHR has received a three-year grant from NIDA to seek to further understand these linkages by systematically exploring the epidemiology of substance abuse among men at high risk for HIV infection. This study is conducting an extensive analysis of existing data sets collected on three different probability samples obtained from Chicago. Taking advantage of parallel instruments and measures across two Chicago-based samples, detailed analyses will compare and explore substance use reporting validity as well as the relative prevalence of substance use/abuse between high-risk and non-high-risk men.

R01 Supplement, Upper Great Lakes Tribes’ Methamphetamine Project

Funding agency: Subaward through the Great Lakes Native American Research Center for Health (NIDA primary)
Time period: October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008
P.I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., Professor and Director, CABHR (Principal Investigator)
John Dellinger, Professor, College of Health Sciences, UWM (Project Director GLNARCH)

This research study will focus on understanding substance abuse patterns among Native American youth in three Upper Midwestern states: Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Investigators will access three statewide, school-based surveys that will facilitate this epidemiological inquiry. Officials from the states of Michigan and Wisconsin have agreed to provide us with the YRBS from 2001, 2003, and 2005. These two statewide surveys ask extensive supplementary questions about substance use that facilitates more detailed information about the epidemiology of substance use than the national Youth Risk Behavioral Survey (YRBS) available from CDC. In addition, the State of Minnesota will provide us with the data from their statewide student assessment of risk behavior, the Minnesota Student Survey form 2001 and 2004. Once 2007 YRBS and Minnesota Student Survey data become available during the coming year, they will attempt to obtain those data as well. Primarily focusing on secondary analyses employing these three data sets, the broad aim of this study is to understand the epidemiology of methamphetamine abuse in school aged Native Americans in the upper Midwest.

EVALUATION

Milwaukee County AODA/TANF Evaluation Project

Funding agency: Wisconsin Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and Milwaukee County Department of Human Services
Time period: January 1, 2000-December 31, 2004
P.I.: Susan Rose, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW
Co-P.I.: Gwat-Yong Lie, Ph.D., Associate Professor, CABHR/HBSSW
Co-P.I.: Joanna Ramirez-Barrett, Assistant Scientist, CABHR/HBSSW
Co-I.: Allen Zweben, D.S.W.,former Director of CABHR and Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Ron Cisler, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist, Director of Center for Urban Population Health, and Associate Professor, College of Health Sciences

This study evaluated programs that target temporary assistance for needy families (TANF)-eligible people (primary women with children) with alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) problems who are involved in multiple human service systems. The goal of the project was community (cross-system) collaboration to support effective, integrated AODA treatment recovery services. This study provided community-wide screening for AODA and identified best practices to improve system outcomes for AODA patients.

INTERVENTION

Treatment of Opioid Dependence in Drug Treatment Court

Funding agency: UW Institute for Clinical &Translational Research Type II Pilot Project (Randy Brown, M.D.)
Time period: March 1, 2009-February 28, 2010
Co-I.: Michael Fendrich, Ph.D., CABHR Director and Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Lisa Berger, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Mike Brondino, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: With these funds, Drs. Fendrich, Berger and Brondino will test an intervention to provide a combination of Buprenorphine and Nalaxone to opioid-dependent participants in the Dane County drug court treatment program. They will compare office-based to clinic-based delivery of medication. The project is led by Randy Brown, M.D., of the UW–Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.

R03, Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Alcohol Use Disorders

Funding agency: Subaward from Marquette University (NIH/NIAAA primary funder)
Time period: December 15, 2005 through November 30, 2008
Site Investigators: Mike Brondino, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW and Laura Otto-Salaj, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW
P.I.: Todd Campbell, CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, Counseling and Educational Psychology, Marquette University

Purpose: This NIAAA funded study is empirically evaluating the impact of supportive significant others (spouses, other family members, close friends) on the course of treatment for clients receiving motivational enhancement therapy for alcohol use disorder. Although clinicians have long suspected that significant others play a key role in the course of MET treatment, there has never been systematic research exploring this issue. This research will lay the groundwork for future research-based treatment protocols that can further improve the chances for long term recovery from alcohol use disorders.
U18, Comparing Two Intervention for Freshman Violators
Funding agency: NIH/NIAAA
Time period: July 15, 2005 through June 30, 2009
P.I.: Carol Haertlein Sells, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, Occupational Therapy, College of Health Sciences

Purpose: This NIAAA funded study is a randomized, controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of two interventions targeted to college freshman who have violated university alcohol policy. One intervention involves a group education program called the “Choices About Responsible Drinking” and the other involves an individual intervention “Brief Alcohol Screening & Intervention.” College drinking is a growing and widespread problem with considerable adverse consequences. Given the lack of effective interventions to address this problem, this study fills a critical and timely void.
RO1, Brief HIV and Alcohol Combined Intervention for Women
Funding agency: NIH/NIAAA
Time period: September 01, 2002 through August 31, 2007 (*no cost extension through August 31, 2008)
P.I.: Laura Otto-Salaj, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW
Co-P.I.: Susan Rose, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: Heart to Heart is an exciting and innovative research study being conducted in partnership with the Milwaukee Women’s Center. CABHR Scientists who are involved with the project are Susan Rose, Co-PI; Mike Brondino, Co-Investigator; and Ron Cisler, Co-Investigator. Other Co-Investigators on the project are Allen Zweben, from Columbia University, and Lance Weinhardt from the Medical College of Wisconsin.

CABHR has received a five-year grant from NIAAA to conduct this study, which provides state-of-the-art treatment for women with alcohol and/or other drug issues. In addition, participants are provided with counseling on other important women’s health issues. Participants receive ten free individual counseling sessions using a therapeutic approach that incorporates treatment components from Cognitive Behavioral and Motivational Enhancement therapies along with other health related counseling. Study participants also receive limited case management services. Upon completion of the therapy sessions, participants are expected to return to the office for five follow-up visits that take place once every three months over a one-year period. CABHR has submitted a no cost extension request to NIAAA to extend the project period through August 21, 2008.

Development of a Lifecourse Timeline Followback Approach to Assessing Alcohol Dependence Recovery and Change Attempts

Funding agency: The Lois and Samuel Silberman Fund
Time period: June 1, 2007 through July 31, 2008
P.I.: Audrey Begun, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW
Co-P.I.: Mike Brondino, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW
Co-P.I.: Lisa Berger, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: Local participants (N=78) in a national multi-site, multi-year study of treatment outcomes for different combinations of pharmacological and behavioral interventions for alcohol dependence (COMBINE Project) are participating in quantitative and qualitative interviews to: (1) describe their alcohol recovery/change attempts across the lifecourse; (2) pilot test a Lifecourse Timeline Followback (LTLFB) method, extending the Timeline Followback (TLFB) technique in clinical use for assessment purposes; and, (3) begin reliability validation of the LTLFB approach by analyzing the degree of concordance in the lifecourse data concerning the period of participation in the original intervention study with data actually collected during that period.

Supporting Jails in Providing Drug Abuse Services
for Women
Funding agency: Bureau of Justice Administration
Time period: June 1, 2006-May 31, 2008
P.I.: Audrey Begun, CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW
Co-P.I.: Susan Rose, Ph.D.,CABHR Scientist and Associate Professor, HBSSW
Co-I.: Stan Stojkovic, Ph.D.,Dean HBSSW
Co-I.: Tom LeBel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, HBSSW

Purpose: This project aims to enhance the capacity of jails to address alcohol and other drug problems experienced by incarcerated women and women who are released back into the community. The research component of this project will evaluate the extent to which state-of-the art interventions are implemented and the impact that the implementation has on addiction and criminal justice outcomes. Dramatic increases in the number of incarcerated women along with inadequate substance abuse screenings and interventions suggest that the proposed intervention and evaluation will fill a critical gap. If the program is successfully implemented and evaluated, and if the evaluation yields promising outcomes, the project could serve as a national model for jail intervention.

R25, Social Work Educator Alcohol Curriculum Training Project
Funding agency: NIH/ National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Time period: April 20, 2004 through April 30, 2007 (*no cost extension through April 30, 2008)
P.I.: Audrey Begun, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: CABHR received a three-year grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) to train social work educators to infuse the new NIAAA social work curriculum on alcohol use disorders into MSW training. The project includes research evaluation of the dissemination and training efforts. Dr. Begun was the editor of the curriculum and co-authored several modules. Several CABHR and HBSSW faculty members were involved in developing the original curriculum modules and are now engaged as trainers in the dissemination phase of the project (Susan Rose, Michael Fendrich, Laura Otto-Salaj, Lisa Berger, José Torres, Goldie Kadushin and Deb Padgett).
Motivational Interviewing for Substance Use Disorders Training
Funding agency: Subaward from Brown County Human Services (Department of Health & Human Services, Public Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health primary funder)
Time period: April 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006
Site P.I.: Lisa Berger, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, CABHR Scientist and Assistant Professor
Trainers include: Steven M. Peterson, MSSW, LCSW, CADC III; Lisa Berger, MSW, Ph.D.; Virginia Stoffel, MS, OT, FAOTA, Ph.D.; and Laura Otto-Salaj, Ph.D.

Purpose: CABHR received funding from Brown County Human Services to train up to 37 clinical service facilitator, case manager and counseling staff in motivational interviewing for substance use disorders. CABHR sent a team of four-three faculty and one full-time practitioner to conduct the introductory training. Individual feedback and coaching of staff during the months followed the initial training and provided staff with clinical proficiency gains. As part of their training efforts, the CABHR group will conduct a study to compare the relative efficacy of individual feedback and/ or staff coaching with consumer consent to audiotape their sessions for research purposes and/or complete assessment measures. Results of this study will be shared with the Quality Team.

CLINICAL TRIAL

U10, Combining Brief and Pharmacotherapies for Alcoholism
Funding agency: Subaward from Columbia University (NIH/NIAAA primary funder)
Time period: February 1, 2005 through August 31, 2006
Site Principal Investigators: Ron Cisler, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist, Director of Center for Urban Population Health, and Associate Professor, College of Health Science and Audrey Begun, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: Project COMBINE concluded in August 2006 after eight years. COMBINE was the first national study to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral treatments alone and in combination with medications for people diagnosed with alcoholism. The study results were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in May 2006. CABHR’s clinical trials unit was one of eleven sites funded to carry out the study. Dr. Allen Zweben, CABHR’s former director, was the principal investigator for the Milwaukee site. When Dr. Zweben relocated to Columbia University, CABHR received a subcontract to continue work on the project. The cost-effectiveness (CE) study examined the relative costs and benefits of the behavioral and medication therapies tested in the COMBINE study. In 2007, CABHR scientists received a Silberman Fund Faculty Grant to recontact local participants from the COMBINE study to test a new tool to assess alcohol recovery.
     Publications
Anton RF, O'Malley SS, Ciraulo DA, et al. Combined pharmacotherapies and behavioral interventions for alcohol dependence: the COMBINE study: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association. May 3 2006;295(17): 2003-2017.

A Multi-Center Extension of Alkermes Study (ALK21-003-EXT) to Evaluate the Long-term Safety of Medisorb Naltrexone

Funding agency: Alkermes, Inc
Time period: January 21, 2004 through July 1, 2007
Site P.I.: Audrey Begun, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW
Co-.I.: Lance Longo, M.D., Aurora Health Care

The Medisorb Naltrexone study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of an injectable form of the drug naltrexone, a medication that can help reduce relapse to heavy drinking among alcohol dependent individuals during recovery. The medication being tested in this study is FDA-approved and is being used in an injectable form in treating alcohol dependence.

Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled, Flexible Dose Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of Topiramate in the Treatment of Alcohol

Funding agency: Subaward from Aurora Health Care (Ortho-McNeil primary funder)
Time period: March 1, 2005 through June 30, 2006
Site P.I.: Audrey Begun, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, HBSSW

Purpose: The topiramate study tested the safety and efficacy of the topiramate medication compared to placebo in the treatment of subjects with alcohol dependence. This was a 14-week, outpatient, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose study of topiramate in subjects with alcohol dependence. The study consisted of a pre-randomization phase including a washout/screening period followed by a double-blind treatment phase including a 6-week titration period, an 8-week maintenance period, and a taper period of approximately 7 days.
COMBINE (Combining Medications and Behavioral Interventions)/Cost Effectiveness
Funding agency: NIH/NIAAA
Time Period: 1997-2008
Site P.I.: Ron Cisler, Ph.D., Director of Center for Urban Population Health, Associate Professor, College of Health Science
Site P.I.: Audrey Begun, Ph.D., CABHR Scientist and Professor, Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

Researchers recently concluded the clinical trial phase of Project COMBINE, and study results were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA, May 2006). Funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, COMBINE was a national, multi-year, multi-site study of treatment outcomes for different combinations of pharmacological and behavioral interventions for alcoholism. CABHR’s clinical trials unit served as the Milwaukee site of the project, and Allen Zweben, D.S.W., CABHR’s founding director, was principal investigator for the Milwaukee site. The cost-effectiveness study is currently examining the relative costs and benefits of the behavioral and medication therapies tested in Project COMBINE.