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Ongoing Projects

 


  1. Advanced Transit Trip Planning Systems using Internet GIS
  2. Development of Multi-Modal Travel Information Systems in Airport Kiosks and Online
  3. Development of Standard-Based Interoperable Internet GIS
  4. Development of Feature-Level Geospatial Data Sharing Systems
  5. GIS Methods for Analyzing Transit Mobility, Jobs Access, and Low-Income Labor Participation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas
  6. Internet GIS for Public Participation
  7. An Evaluation of AVL Impacts on Small and Medium Sized Transit Agencies

 

Advanced Transit Trip Planning Systems using Internet GIS

This project created an online trip planning service for Waukesha Metro Transit in Waukesha, Wisconsin.  Made possible by internet GIS, this site allows travelers to find the most efficient bus itinerary trip possible based on the start location, the end location, travel date, and starting or destination-arrival time. Currently, a similar system is being developed for the City of Milwaukee, and development is underway using integrated Web Services to combine the Waukesha and Milwaukee system to allow users to seamlessly make trip itinerary planning cross the jurisdiction boundary.

1.  Waukesha Transit Trip Planner
2.  Milwaukee Transit Trip Planner
3.  South Eastern Wisconsin Transit Trip Planner

Development of Multi-Modal Travel Information Systems in Airport Kiosks and Online

CASIR is developing an online multi-modal travel information system to be installed on a set of four multimedia kiosks at Milwaukee's Mitchell International Airport. The multi-modal travel information systems will provide bus and real-time traffic information that allow travelers to search the best routes and best travel modes to get to their destinations. Each kiosk will be two-tiered; the upper tier will have screens displaying real-time traffic information, while the lower tier will have interactive touch screens that allow users to search through bus, taxi and rental car information. The information includes bus routes and schedules, the cost and travel time of taking a taxi, and optimum driving routes given the current real-time traffic conditions on the freeways.

Development of Standard-Based Interoperable Internet GIS

CASIR is conducting important research in this emerging area. Interoperable Internet GIS refers to the ease of use and transfer of data between different computer environments. In an interoperable system, the user interface should appear the same, no matter which platform is being accessed. This project is using Geography Markup Language (GML) as a coding and data transporting mechanism to achieve data interoperability, using Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) to display GML data on the Web, and Web Feature Server (WFS) as a data query and management mechanism to access and retrieve data at the feature level in real time on the Web. The prototype can be seen at http://129.89.71.203/geoclientupdate/shilin.svg

Development of Feature-Level Geospatial Data Sharing Systems

This project provides a standard-based framework for sharing geospatial data at the feature level without the use of the conventional spatial processing approach that requires conflation. Two transportation network datasets are used in the case study to develop a prototype of geospatial data sharing system, which allows the user to access and extract data at the feature level on the Web from distributed sources. It also allows the data providers to provide their data according to a standard data model and framework, so that data about a particular feature can be exchanged. This has important implementations for real-time operations in security and emergency responses.

GIS Methods for Analyzing Transit Mobility, Jobs Access, and Low-Income Labor Participation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas

This study, supported by the National Science Foundation, examines the relationship between bus access and employment among welfare recipients. Dr. Peng has been working with Thomas Sanchez from Virginia Tech and Qing Shen from the University of Maryland to test the following hypothesis: welfare recipients with convenient access to public transportation are better able to find and keep jobs than those without such access. Research is being conducted in 6 cities: Milwaukee, Portland, Denver, Baltimore, Dallas, and Atlanta. 

Internet GIS for Public Participation

This project developed a framework for a web-based public participation system that allows the general public to utilize the Internet GIS technology without owning the software and with limited training.  The article describes the use of Internet GIS, Internet communications, and scenario-building tools to create systems that serve four planning functions: exploration, evaluation, scenario-building, and a forum .

An Evaluation of AVL Impacts on Small and Medium Sized Transit Agencies

Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) systems use global position systems (GPS) to track vehicles on an electronic map in real time. Municipal bus systems can use this technology to track the route and schedule adherence of each bus.  The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has sponsored this research project (in collaboration with the Center for Urban Transportation Studies at UWM) to evaluate the impact of AVL implementation on public transit efficiency. The first phase of the project has been completed and the project team is working on the second phase.