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Architecture &  the Elderly

(Unless otherwise indicated, all publications below can be accessed by clicking on the link above)


A STORY OF INNOVATION: THE ALEXIAN VILLAGE HEALTH CENTER, MILWAUKEE
Mark A. Proffitt and Chen-Jui Yong

This monograph is the result of a study at the Alexian Village of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a continuing care retirement community. It shows how the quality of its Health Center residents' lives were improved through manipulation of the physical environment. This monograph set out to achieve four major goals: 1) to show the relationships between organizational, social, and environmental factors; 2) to demonstrate the role of the physical environment as a therapeutic tool; 3) to demonstrate the importance of the preparatory process in creating a facility for older persons; 4) to demonstrate the rewards of ongoing analysis and evaluation.

ISBN 0-938744-86-0
Pp. xi + 75; plans and illustrations
R94-51/

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DESIGNING DAY CARE DESIGN
Solutions from an Inter-professional Student Practicum

Keith Diaz Moore
along with
Deborah Bower-Thomas, Nao Kamayama, Angela Feser, Ching-Chih Ma, Lee Hall, Cory Nelson, Anne Hanenberg, Amy Palmer, Myah Houghten, Kimberly Ward

This monograph presents discrete design interventions developed by architecture, interior design and landscape architecture students in a inter-professional practicum. Students developed an understanding of the context of adult day care settings. Each student developed a discrete design intervention that could be utilized to enhance the therapeutic milieu of large open spaces endemic to adult day care. These interventions are categorized in one of three types: spatial organization, partitions and activity-oriented furniture.

ISBN 1-886437-13-0
Pp. iv + 56; photographs
R01-1/


DEMENTIA DAY CARE FACILITY [Not on e-reserve, contact author for more information]
Development Workbook
Keith Diaz Moore


The purpose of this workbook is to provide substantive and procedural instruction in the relationship between program development and physical environmental design of adult day care centers. The workbook is structured in seven modules: 1) Literature relevant to the environmental design for dementia and adult day services, 2) the therapeutic goals for design, and 3) overview of the facility development process. Modules 4 through 7 take the reader through problem-seeking, purpose development, assessing the possibilities for success, and programming, respectively. The final four modules are illustrated with real-life examples.
 


DESIGNING A BETTER DAY
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR ADULT DAY CARE 1990-1998
Andrew Alden

This monograph contains 56 annotated bibliographies of literature published since 1990 on Adult Day Care facilities. The annotations are organized into five components - organization, staff, family, client, and physical setting - all of which form the dimensions of place for Adult Day Care. A matrix of the annotated bibliographies gives an overview of categories addressed in each publication.

ISBN 0-938744-98-4
Pp. iii + 106; some drawings, photographs
R99-21/


DESIGNING A BETTER DAY
ADULT DAY CENTERS COMPARATIVE CASE STUDIES

Lyn Dally Geboy, Stacy Mleziva, Keith Diaz Moore, Yavuz Taneli, Gerald Weisman, La Vonne Wroblewski, Andrew Alden

The Adult Day Center (ADC) is emerging as a new and important social institution and place type in the continuum of care environments. Nine case studies representing the range of ADC's currently operating in the United States are considered from a holistic, systemic perspective. Each case is presented in terms of place profile, program, physical setting and "the place in use." The results are not a matter of ADC "best practices" or "good/bad" ways of doing things, but rather a method of identifying characteristics and components that appear to contribute to making a positive difference in the experience of adult day care.

ISBN 1-886437-14-9
Pp. iv + 149; plans and photographs
R01-2/


DESIGNING A BETTER DAY [Not on e-reserve, contact author for more information]
Planning and Design Guidelines for Adult and Dementia Day Centers
Keith Diaz Moore, Gerald Weisman, Lyn Dally Geboy and Stacy Mlezvia

The purpose of this book is to assist those responsible for developing Adult Day Care (ADC) facilities in creating places that support the needs of the physically frail elderly as well as those with dementia. The process of reconceptualizing ADC facilities begins with a review of the historical context of elder care, and presents an integrative framework for understanding ADC facilities as holistic places. The steps of visioning, feasibility and linking activity programming with architectural programming are described in depth. Architectural design guidelines fro ADC facilities are presented as a collection of interrelated patterns.
 


ENVIRONMENTS FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY VOL. II
Mylinda Barisas, Margaret Calkins, Habib Chaudhury, Dannette Johansen, and Mark Proffitt

This monograph reviews current literature published since 1986 about people with dementia, therapeutic goals for this population, and the social, organizational, and physical environments in which they live. This volume is a continuation of annotations of literature published prior to 1989 which follows the same conceptual framework,

ISBN 0-938744-82-8
Pp. viii + 96
R93-21

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IMPACT OF DESIGN INTERVENTIONS IN NURSING HOME ON RESIDENTS WITH DEMENTIA, THEIR FAMILIES, AND THE STAFF
Benyamin Schwarz, Habib Chuadhury, Ruth Brent,  Teresa Cooney,  Katie Dunne and Jane Bostik 

The purpose of this study was to determine whether certain design interventions in a nursing home affected resident with dementia outcomes, family involvement and interaction, and staff perceptions of care delivery. The study was conducted in a nursing home. The study site included dining and bathing facilities that serve smaller groups of residents. The new design promised to contrast the medical orientation of the existing nursing home with a more residential environment.  The study design involved a two-group pretest-posttest comparison in which a sample of residents who eventually were relocated to the newly designed wing of the facility (Treatment Group) was compared with a sample that remained in the existing setting (Control Group). Findings and implication of this study provide new knowledge integrating the diverse professional aspects that contribute to a responsive long-term care setting.

ISBN 1-886437-22-K 
Pp. iv + 77 
R02-3/


IMPROVING DINING FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA
Jennifer A. Brush

The physical and social environments are important, but often not actualized, resources that can have a significant impact on the overall goals of nutritional intake and quality of life for people with dementia. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effect of improved lighting and enhanced table setting contrast on residents' meal consumption, social interaction, independence, and behaviors during meals in both assisted living and long-term care environments serving people with dementia. A three-day nutritional intake record, footcandle measures, the Meal Assistance Screening Tool, and the Communication Outcome Measure of Functional Independence were administered at baseline and post-test four weeks after the intervention. Twenty-five residents with dementia at two long term care facilities participated in the pilot study. After a lighting and contrast intervention, there were improvement in oral intake , communication, and functional abilities at both facilities.

ISBN 1-886437-19-X 
Pp.21; photographs 
R01-7/


PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN FOR DEMENTIA
Gerald Weisman, Uriel Cohen and Kristen Day

The monograph describes an applied research project whose goals are: 1) to extend understanding of optimal micro-environmental design for people with dementia; 2) to present a systematic process for the planning, programming and design of environments for people with dementia; and 3) to illustrate this by the planning, programming and design of a model 50-person residential facility. Sponsored by Helen Daniel Bader, Milwaukee.

ISBN 0-938744-72-0
Pp. 107; 59 illustrations
R90-3/


THERAPEUTIC KITCHENS IN DEMENTIA CARE SETTINGS
John P. Marsden,  Rebecca A. Meehen,  Margaret P. Calkins

"Therapeutic kitchens," also referred to as "country kitchen," "domestic kitchens," or "activity-based kitchens," have been cited as supportive spaces for residents with dementia. The purpose of this research is to identify physical features that are typically included in therapeutic kitchen design and to explore how these features support activities. Interviews and observation were conducted in the facilities with a therapeutic kitchen. A two-page questionnaire regarding therapeutic kitchens was distributed to 631 nursing homes and assisted living facilities throughout the United States. Results suggest that universal design principles, certain appliances and safety features, as well as homelike imagery, should be incorporated in therapeutic kitchen design.

ISBN 1-886437-10-6 
Pp. 63; photographs 
R99-5


TOWARDS A LANGUAGE OF ASSISTED LIVING [Not on e-reserve, contact author for more information]
Keith Diaz Moore

This monograph is based upon a research project funded jointly by the American Institute of Architects and the American Hospital Association to explore and develop techniques in the architectural benchmarking of assisted living facilities for older persons. The study documents ten case studies that are reflective of the range and diversity of architectural manifestations present in the assisted living industry Each case is documented via quantitative, narrative and graphic means and presents both objective as well as evaluative information. The study also provides an exploratory investigation of how professionals may begin to distill patterns emerging in the field, some of which are most unexpected, illustrating the need for further empirical study.


THE UNIT'S EDGE:
Exploring the Boundary between Public and Private Domains in Residential Settings for Older Persons
Mark A. Proffitt and Sherlylyn H. Briller

This monograph explores the architectural boundary between the private domain in residential settings for older persons. In two retirement communities that encouraged personalization of resident entryways, quantitative and qualitative research methods were employed to compare different dwellings' edge treatments. This exploratory study addressed three major areas: 1) How are these edges used? 2) What factors influence their use? and 3) To what extent did the use of these areas provide a means for resident self-expression and promote socialization with others? Key study findings result in a typology of edge uses and architectural design guidelines.

ISBN 1-886437-23-8 
Pp. 159; plans, charts and photographs
R02-4


VICTORIA PLAZA REVISITED: LESSONS FOR THE EVALUATION OF HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY
Editor: Arza Churchman 
Contributors: Frances Carp, Min Kantrowitz, Gerald S. Weisman, and Habib Chaudhury

This monograph is based upon a workshop sponsored by the Institute on Aging and Environment at the 1994 EDRA Conference. San Antonio is the home of the first public housing facility specifically designed for older persons and the authors took the opportunity to reflect on the substantive and methodological issues that can be learned from Victoria Plaza. Frances Carp, who conducted the original longitudinal study, presents reflections on the early fray into Post Occupancy Evaluation and the lessons applicable today. Min Kantrowitz and Gerald Weisman present their comments and conclusions.

ISBN 0-938744-88-7
Pp. and illustrations
R94-7

Sample graphic

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University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

last updated on March 04, 2005