Skip Navigation
UW-Milwaukee - Center for Economic Development

Faculty Fellows

Anne Bonds

Anne Bonds

Assistant Professor, Department of Geography
bondsa@uwm.edu | 414-229-4872

Anne Bonds is a fellow at the Center and an Assistant Professor of Geography and Urban Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Dr. Bonds earned a B.S. in Economics from the University of Wyoming, an M.A. in Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona, and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington. Her research examines racialized and gendered poverty and inequality in relation to economic restructuring, welfare reform, and community development agendas. Her work has especially focused on the political economy of incarceration.

Dr. Bonds currently has research projects examining 1) gender, race, and post-incarceration geographies in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; 2) prison-led rural development agendas and racialized poverty; and 3) non-profit housing provision, neoliberal community development, and the politics of race. She teaches courses on economic and urban geography and on the geography of race in the United States. Her research has been published in a variety of journals, including the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Antipode, Geography Compass and Social and Cultural Geography.

Marcus Britton

Marcus Britton

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
britton@uwm.edu | 414-229-5308

Marcus L. Britton is an Assistant Professor of sociology and urban studies at UWM. He earned an MA in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Sociology & Management from Northwestern University. His research interests include the role of commercial finance in metropolitan development, the causes and consequences of residential segregation, the role of neighborhoods in race relations, and the effects of residential mobility on place-based inequality. His research has been published in Urban Studies, City & Community, the Journal of Marriage and Family, Social Forces, and Social Science & Medicine, among other peer-reviewed journals.

Dr. Britton teaches courses on urban and economic sociology, research methods and statistics. His research on residential segregation has been featured on the Atlantic Cities and the Brian Lehrer Show. His current projects include a national analysis of how residential mobility during adolescence affects educational attainment during young adulthood and several studies of the relationship between housing segregation and poor birth outcomes among black and Latino women in U.S. metropolitan areas.

William Holahan

Emeritus Professor, Department of Economics
holahan@uwm.edu | 414-229-4811

William Holahan

William Holahan is a senior fellow at the Center and Emeritus Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dr. Holahan earned his B.S. in Physics from the University of Notre Dame and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Brown University. He has served in numerous University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee faculty leadership positions, most notably chairing the UW System search for UWM Chancellor. His efforts have also contributed to the establishment of two interdisciplinary majors—Global Studies and Economics/Business/Mathematics. Dr. Holahan also serves on the founding executive committee and the faculty of the new UWM School of Freshwater Sciences and has served as Associate Director of the Center on Economic Education at UWM.

Dr. Holahan has received two university awards for teaching excellence. His teaching-focused research has been ranked nationally among the top fifty in "Ranking Economics Journals, Economics Departments, and Economists Using Teaching-Focused Research Productivity," Lo, et al., Southern Economics Journal 2008, 74(3). Dr. Holahan's research interests are in applied microeconomics and public policy. He has written on social security, spatial pricing, location theory, urban sprawl, negative income tax, environmental taxes, and baseball labor contracts. In addition, he has co-authored two textbooks on microeconomics. His research papers have appeared in numerous journals, including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Economic Theory, the International Economic Review, the Southern Economic Journal, and The Journal of Regional Science.

Ryan Holifield

Ryan Holifield

Assistant Professor, Department of Geography
holifiel@uwm.edu | 414-229-4868

Ryan Holifield is a faculty fellow at the Center and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Urban Studies Programs at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dr. Holifield holds a B.A. in English from Duke University, an M.A. in Geography from the University of Georgia, and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Minnesota. At UWM, he serves on the advisory committee for the Conservation and Environmental Sciences program, and he has been involved with programs at the Center for 21st Century Studies and the service learning component of the Center for Community-Based Learning, Leadership, & Research.

Dr. Holifield’s broad research and teaching interests are environmental justice and social justice in the governance of urban environments. His publications and work in progress address such topics as environmental justice policy in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the politics of risk assessment within tribal lands, the politics of brownfields redevelopment, inequities in volunteer activity in urban parks, and the dynamics of democratic participation in the restoration of urban waterways. He co-edited (with Michael Porter and Gordon Walker) the anthology Spaces of Environmental Justice, and his publications have appeared in journals including the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Antipode, Geoforum, Urban Geography, GeoJournal, Environmental Justice, and Environmental Practice.

Linda McCarthy

Linda McCarthy

Associate Professor, Department of Geography
lmccarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-6405

Linda McCarthy is a fellow at the Center and a faculty member in the Department of Geography and the Urban Studies Programs at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dr. McCarthy earned her B.A. in Geography and Archaeology from University College Dublin in Ireland and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Minnesota. She is also currently a visiting professor in the School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy at University College Dublin where she is undertaking research, making research presentations, and teaching some undergraduate and graduate classes.

Dr. McCarthy’s teaching interests overlap with her research interests in cities, globalization, and Europe. As an urban geographer and certified planner, Dr. McCarthy has research interests in the United States, Europe, and China. Her interrelated research foci are situated at the intersection of global-local/regional interconnections: Urban and regional dimensions of globalization; Competition among localities for private-sector investment and jobs; Regional cooperation to address wasteful competition among localities; and Brownfield redevelopment within metropolitan regions. She has co-authored two textbooks (on cities and on globalization) and her research papers have appeared in numerous journals including Economic Development Quarterly, Environment and Planning A, Journal of Planning Education Planning and Research, Land Use Policy, The Professional Geographer, and Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie.

Paru Shah

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
shahp@uwm.edu | 414-229-3979

Paru Shah is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is Co-PI of the Local Elections in America Project, an NSF-funded project that is collecting data on local election outcomes across the U.S. She earned her B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Michigan, her Masters in Political Science from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and her Ph.D. in Political Science from Rice University. Her teaching and research interests include race and representation, urban politics, and public policy analysis.

Dr. Shah has published articles on Latino and black descriptive and substantive representation, education policy, the Voting Rights Act, and most recently, candidate emergence and political ambition. Her current projects include the development of a crowdsourced data repository of state and local candidates for office, examination of the effects of multiracial contexts on electoral representation (with Melissa Marschall, Rice University), and the foreclosure crisis and urban resilience (with Amber Wichowsky, Marquette University).