Youth Culture

    1. Bullfrog Films -- "Turning 16"
      http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/t16s.html
      Teens around the world listen to the same music, watch the same videos, and idolize the same pop stars, but do they hold similar views on issues such as marriage, culture and religion? The introduction to the 8-part series that explores whether there is such a thing as a global teenager. The series focuses on the lives of six teens in six different countries and examines the major issues facing young people everywhere.
    2. Economist.com -- "A Long Wait" December 21, 2000
      http://www.economist.com/surveys/displayStory.cfm?Story_id=455214
      In most developing countries, kids get a raw deal. That will take time to change. Most of the world's youngsters would love the chance to climb some tradition-bound company's seniority ladder, however slowly; or indeed to get a job of any sort. Two-thirds of the 2 billion young people on earth live outside the industrialized world. While the rich countries are ageing, the developing countries are still disproportionately young: 36% of the population there are below the age of 15, compared with just 18% in the rich world.
    3. Economist.com -- "Youth, Inc" December 21, 2000
      http://www.economist.com/surveys/displayStory.cfm?Story_id=455191
      Before they become earners, the young are already powerful spenders. Sure, the young are going to change the world. But first they are going to buy a huge amount of stuff. The economic influence of the young has never been greater. Just in America alone, the 31m kids between 12 and 19 control $155 billion-worth of consumer spending, according to Teenage Research Unlimited, a market-research firm. Their numbers are slightly smaller than those of the boomers at the same age, but their spending power, adjusted for inflation, is five or six times as large.
    4. Global Policy Forum
      http://www.globalpolicy.org/globaliz/cultural/2002/0414cuba.htm
      "The Rap RevoluciĆ³n" by Eugene Robinson
    5. Korea Online - Youth Culture
      http://www.johnwasham.com/koreanonline/youth.shtml

    6. Krzysztof Kieslowski's The Decalogue
      http://www.facets.org/asticat?function=buyitem&catname=facets&catnum=/64059
      Krzysztof Kieslowski's modern masterpiece, The Decalogue, is one of cinema's greatest and most ambitious achievements. Named #1 film of the year by both the New York Times and Entertainment Weekly upon its initial release, this extraordinary 10-part series based on the Ten Commandments brilliantly uses modern contexts to examine the fundamental and timeless issues of human existence. After years of waiting, The Decalogue, is finally receiving its DVD and video release on August 19th. The exclusive 3-volume DVD set includes an introduction by Roger Ebert, an interview with Kieslowski, a visit to the set of The Decalogue, a look at Kieslowski's life and career and a booklet with additional features.
    7. NPR: 'The Hipster Handbook' The Really Hip Would Never Be Caught with This Guide
      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1311640
      If you're a hipster, you already knew that. But if you need help understanding the latest lingo for the hip urbanite, The Hipster Handbook may be just the guide for you. NPR's Madeleine Brand stops by the book party at a downtown New York club to find out just what it means to be a hipster.
    8. PBS.org -- The Merchants of Cool
      http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/cool/
      A Frontline report on the creators and marketers of popular culture for teenagers.
    9. The Global Youth Action Network
      http://www.tigweb.org/home.html
      The Global Youth Action Network is a growing collaboration among youth and youth organizations that are committed to uniting their efforts to improve our world. With member organizations in 177 countries, the Network is facilitating greater collaboration to improve youth engagement and participation in decision-making. GYAN also provides support to young people who take positive action to improve their communities and recognition for the amazing contributions young people are making every day.
    10. Time.com Asia -- "Export Machine"
      http://www.time.com/time/asia/asia/magazine/1999/990503/export1.html
      "While Asia's older generation is still haunted by Japan's wartime brutality, Hello Kitty culture is hot with the region's youth, who are happy to snap up all things Japanese"
    11. Time.com Asia -- "From We to Me"
      http://www.time.com/time/asia/asia/magazine/1999/990503/cover1.html
      Japan's youth are out for thrills, stepping clear of the buttoned-down, uniformed life of their parents and onto society's dance floor. They are crafting their own style, an unfocused commitment to doing things differently with in-your-face manners that are shocking a country that reveres politeness. They dye their hair shades of brown, red, yellow, blue, and purple. They tan their skin until their complexions resemble those of California lifeguards. They jabber noisily on phones in public. They are rude. They cause trouble; a juvenile crime wave is spreading across Japan. Teenage girls from middle-class families prostitute themselves for middle-aged men. Schools once famous for rigidity and discipline have turned into chaotic places where students even physically assault teachers.
    12. Time.com Asia -- "The Boys are Trendsetters, Too"
      http://www.time.com/time/asia/asia/magazine/1999/990503/boys1.html
      Although teenage girls dominate the attention of Japan's trend-watchers, elementary-school boys like Naoto are no slackers as power shoppers. While older girls spend to imitate women, boys do it just to enjoy being young. By setting game trends for smaller kids, these boys are "leaders of the children's world," says Hideo Takayama, president of the Children's Research Institute in Tokyo. Digital boys like Naoto are also helping prop up Japan's stagnant economy, as they and their parents buy cool stuff like videogames, the $6.3 billion pillar of the entertainment industry.
    13. Youth at the United Nations
      http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unyin/
      The United Nations aims to enhance awareness of the global situation of youth and of the rights and aspirations of young people. It works towards greater participation of youth in the social and economic life of their societies.