UWM College of Letters & Science

NOTICE: Some of the Letters & Science Dean’s Office staff that were located in Holton Hall have moved temporarily to the Northwest Quadrant, fifth floor. Advisors are in Holton Hall (main reception desk is in the center of the first floor hallway) and Bolton Hall (for African American Student Services, American Indian Student Services, and Southeast Asian American Student Services). The new locations for the Dean and his administrative staff can be found at http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/contact/.

The largest of UWM's schools and colleges, our curriculum spans all of the areas that are traditionally included in a liberal arts education: Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences. Every L&S student graduates prepared for work or graduate school with a well-rounded foundation including practical knowledge in their chosen field and lifelong skills in critical thinking, problem solving, and communication.

Enhance your education with: undergraduate research, honors, service learning, study abroad, first-year seminars, and internships.

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Events Calendar
Sep 19
After 10 years of exploration on Mars, NASA believes it can send a human there by 2035. Why do we want to go to Mars? Can humans survive there? What can Mars teach us about our future on Earth? "The Red Planet" features the endeavors of the Mars Exploration Rover program, from the early "Opportunity" rover to the current "Curiosity" and the future "Mars 2020" rovers.

Admission is $3. Open to the public. This program repeats every Friday through Oct. 24.

Sponsored by the UWM Manfred Olson Planetarium.

http://www4.uwm.edu/planetarium/shows/fridayshow/future-friday-night-show.cfm

Sep 19
A 2014-15 Year of the Humanities event.

Boswell Books welcomes a selection of graduate students and faculty from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Creative Writing Program, who will read from their own original work.

http://boswell.indiebound.com/upcoming-events

Sep 20
A Year of the Humanities 2014-15 event.

HaMapah/The Map is a multimedia dance journey that traces the intersections of classically trained dancer Adam McKinney, former member of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre with -- African American, Native American, and Jewish heritage. HaMapah explores issues of identity, ancestry, and family by weaving together contemporary dance with archival material, personal interviews, Yiddish and American songs, and video set to traditional, contemporary, and classical music.

Co-sponsored by the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center and the Sam & Helen Stahl Center for Jewish Studies.

At the Zelazo Center.

http://www4.uwm.edu/jewishstudies/news_events/index.cfm

Sep 22
"Unbelievable Cities" explores late 19th and early 20th century cityscapes by James McNeill Whistler, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, and Joseph Pennell, three masters of the Etching Revival Movement. This show examines the way each artist captured the essence of the city through thematic differences and unique stylistic approaches.

The exhibit, generously sponsored by the Friends of Art History, runs from Sept. 15 through Oct. 23, Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/arthistory/gallery/exhibitions/current.cfm

Sep 22
Join us in UWM's Hefter Center for the annual Melvin Lurie Memorial Prize ceremony.

The Prize is given to an outstanding student or recent graduate of the university’s Masters in Human Resources and Labor Relations (MHRLR) program. It honors the late Melvin Lurie, a former professor and founder of the MHRLR program.

The Lurie Labor-Management Cooperation Prize honors individuals and/or organizations for outstanding service in promoting, creating or researching labor-management cooperation. It commemorates Lurie’s efforts to foster cooperative labor-management relations in Wisconsin, an effort that culminated in his organization of the first Wisconsin State Conference on Labor-Management Cooperation in 1987.

Please RSVP to Pat Fefer at fefer@uwm.edu or 414-229-4310.

Sep 23
"Unbelievable Cities" explores late 19th and early 20th century cityscapes by James McNeill Whistler, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, and Joseph Pennell, three masters of the Etching Revival Movement. This show examines the way each artist captured the essence of the city through thematic differences and unique stylistic approaches.

The exhibit, generously sponsored by the Friends of Art History, runs from Sept. 15 through Oct. 23, Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/arthistory/gallery/exhibitions/current.cfm

Sep 23
A Year of the Humanities 2014-15 event.

Sherman Alexie, a preeminent Native American poet, novelist, performer, filmmaker, and author of UWM’s 2014 Common Read, visits UWM this fall to share “The Partially True Story of the True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.”

In the Wisconsin Room of the UWM student union. Advanced ticket purchase recommended.

See http://www.aux.uwm.edu/union/distinguished_lecture_series/ for ticket information and prices.

Sep 24
"Unbelievable Cities" explores late 19th and early 20th century cityscapes by James McNeill Whistler, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, and Joseph Pennell, three masters of the Etching Revival Movement. This show examines the way each artist captured the essence of the city through thematic differences and unique stylistic approaches.

The exhibit, generously sponsored by the Friends of Art History, runs from Sept. 15 through Oct. 23, Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/arthistory/gallery/exhibitions/current.cfm

Sep 24
A Year of the Humanities 2014-15 event.

One in a series of creative writing workshops that use the late Dr. Maya Angelou’s body of work and life story as a springboard for discussion and inspiration to create original work of any written form.

Participants will be invited to perform at Lyrical Sanctuary presents In Memoriam: Maya Angelou on December 10 from 8-10pm in the UWM Union Fireside Lounge. Participants will also be invited to share in the creation of an altar honoring Maya Angelou as part of the annual Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) exhibit in the UWM Union Concourse on November 3-5.

Hosted by: Ching-In Chen as part of the Sister Talk: Multicultural Women’s Circle series

This event is free and open to the public in Bolton Hall, Room 196.

Sep 25
"Unbelievable Cities" explores late 19th and early 20th century cityscapes by James McNeill Whistler, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, and Joseph Pennell, three masters of the Etching Revival Movement. This show examines the way each artist captured the essence of the city through thematic differences and unique stylistic approaches.

The exhibit, generously sponsored by the Friends of Art History, runs from Sept. 15 through Oct. 23, Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/arthistory/gallery/exhibitions/current.cfm

Sep 26
A Year of the Humanities 2014-15 event.

Annual conference hosted this year by UWM in various parts of Curtin Hall.

See the full schedule at: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/philosophy/conference/

Sep 26
William Huxhold, Urban Planning, UW-Milwaukee, presents "GIS Comes to Kazakhstan" in the American Geographical Society Library of UWM's Golda Meir Library.

http://uwm.edu/libraries/agsl/academic-adventure-series/

Sep 26
A Year of the Humanities 2014-15 event.

Paul Jay from the English Department at Loyola University Chicago presents in Curtin Hall, Room 118.

I want to use the Center's linked focus on the temporal and financial meanings of “futures” to explore the benefits and risks involved in grounding our work in a specifically critical humanism, one that both contests and revises its traditional claims, practices, and subjects. Perhaps the key risk here is that a critical (or anti- or post-) humanism threatens to alienate a mainstream audience largely wedded to the idea that the humanities have a primarily curatorial function, one committed to preserving and venerating the past. (I'll argue we need to develop a more nuanced way to talk about the temporality of the humanities.)

Our challenge is rhetorical, strategic, and pragmatic: how do we design a humanities practice for the future that ensures we will have a future? How do we develop language for describing a new humanities that makes sense to people who understand them in very conventional terms? These days defenses of the humanities too often fall back on idealized, pallid, and outdated descriptions of their value that can be as counter-productive to our future as attacks that blame the “crisis” in the humanities on theory and political correctness. We need to develop a language strategically calibrated to underscore the value of theory and critique, the significance of new, innovative methodologies, and a vision of the humanities that links up with the STEM disciplines.

The risks involved in such a collective enterprise are particularly pronounced in literary studies, especially with regard to the shift from emphasizing literature to a new stress on literacy, and on the literary as a mode, style, or perspective that operates within but also outside of literature. I'll explore as well the risks and benefits of new work grounded in aesthetics, formalism, reading (close, hyper, surface, etc.), cognitive studies, neuroscience, ecology, and technology, including the pros and cons of their response to the siren call of utility and marketplace value.

http://www4.uwm.edu/c21/pages/events/abstracts/14fall/jay.html

Sep 26
A Year of the Humanities 2014-15 event.

Edwin McCann from the University of Southern California presents. In Curtin Hall, Room 175.

http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/philosophy/colloquia/

Sep 26
Ferdi Hellweger, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University, presents "Microbes, Models, and Measurements: Individual-Based Understanding of Microscopic Life" in Lapham Hall N101.

Coffee and cookies served outside the lecture hall from 3:30 to 4:00pm.

Sponsored by the UWM Department of Biological Sciences.

http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/biologicalsciences/

Full Calendar | iCal