winkler

Erin N. Winkler

Associate Professor
Chair of the Department of Africology

Mitchell Hall, 225
(414) 229-5080
winklere@uwm.edu
Vita (pdf-108kb)

Degree:

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Research Interests:

Racial socialization; Racial identity development in African American families and communities; The impact of gender, skin tone, and other demographic factors on racial identity development and responses to racism; The effect of place on shaping conceptualizations and experiences of race and racism.

Teaching Interests:

Effects of racism on individuals, communities, and society; Racial identity development and well-being in children and adolescents; African American families; Qualitative research methods in Africology; Sociology of African American communities; Race and place (nationally and internationally).

Courses Offered:

Africol 100: Black Reality: Survey of African American Society
Africol 193: Freshman Seminar: Race in Popular Culture
Africol 222: Research Methods in Africology
Africol 265: Psychological Effects of Racism
Africol 565: Topics in Africology: Raising Children, “Race-ing” Children
Africol 700: Theories and Methods in Qualitative Research in Africology
Africol 845: Race/Ethnicity and the Psychology of Oppression
Africology 880: Seminar on Issues in Africology: Qualitative Interviewing & Grounded Theory

Selected Publications:

Winkler, Erin N. 2012. Learning Race, Learning Place: Shaping Racial Identities and Ideas in African-American Childhoods, Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. (More Information)

Winkler, Erin N. 2011. "My aunt talks about black people all the time": The significance of extended family networks in the racial socialization of African American adolescents. In Extended Families in Africa and the African Diaspora, edited by Osei-Mensah Aborampah and Niara Sudarkasa, 273-295. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press. (pdf, 2mb)

Winkler, Erin N. 2010. "I learn being black from everywhere I go": Color-blindness, travel, and the formation of racial attitudes among African American adolescents. Sociological Studies of Children and Youth, Vol 13: Children and Youth Speak for Themselves, 423-453. Emerald Group Publishing. (pdf, 300kb)

Winkler, Erin N. 2009. Children are not colorblind: How young children learn race. PACE: Practical Approaches for Continuing Education 3(3):1-8. HighReach Learning. (pdf, 271kb)

Winkler, Erin N. 2008. "It's like arming them": African American mothers’ views on racial socialization. In The Changing Landscape of Work and Family in the American Middle Class: Reports from the Field, eds. Elizabeth Rudd and Lara Descartes, 211-241. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books (Rowman & Littlefield). (pdf, 5.5mb)

Winkler, Erin N. 2003. The attack on affirmative action: The "race neutral" excuse. The Black Scholar, Vol. 33, No. 3-4. (pdf, 851kb)

Other Resources:

Photographs

Dr. Erin Winkler spoke with Milwaukee Public Radio's Stephanie Lecci about how childlren learn and perceive race and how we consider it as adults. Listen to the interview.

Dr. Erin Winkler was featured on Iowa Public Radio's "Talk of Iowa" program as an expert on how children learn about race. Listen to the show.