Graduate Course Offering Archive


Spring 2013

English 711 : Topics in Professional Writing sec 202
Subtitle: Writing for Social Media
Dave Clark
Online

"In this course we will look at social networking, with an emphasis on the practical and theoretical concerns of writers. Students will be expected to read and discuss numerous key mainstream and academic texts, including excerpts from the following: � Shirky�s Cognitive Surplus and Here Comes Everybody � Johnson�s Everything Bad is Good for You � Surowiecki�s The Wisdom of Crowds � Lessig�s Free Culture � Hunt�s The Whuffie Factor We will also, of course, learn and evaluate some of the most common social media. Students will evaluate and develop their own use of social media tools and approaches, write and revise several response papers, evaluate and critique an organization�s existing social media approach, and design and test a social media plan for a small organization."

More info: dclark@uwm.edu


English 711 : Topics in Professional Writing
Subtitle: Educational & Advocacy Writing in Health & Medicine
Scott Graham
Thursdays 4:30

ENGL 711 is designed to teach students the latest techniques for the development of effective educational and advocacy communication in health and medicine. Students will learn about and practice strategies for audience-centered information design, usability testing, and data visualization development�all while keeping a focus on the social, political, and ethical dimensions of health education and advocacy. Specific course units will focus on 1) general theories of medical and public health communication, 2) adjunctive patient education, 3) community-outreach public health campaigns, 4) illness-based advocacy communication, and 5) health industry criticism and activism.

More info: http://sscottgraham.com/archives/355, grahams@uwm.edu


English 741 : Approaches to the Modern II
Subtitle: Modern Times: History and Modernity
Theodore Martin
Tuesday 4.30 to 7.10p

This course begins from the premise that one of the signal inventions of modernity is �modernity��not just a new period in history, but a new idea of historical periods. How does modernity change our relation to history? What happens once we tumble into modern time? We will survey the range of theoretical, historical, and political issues that arise from modern accounts of history and temporality. These include theories and critiques of modernity proper; the methodological demands of historicism and new historicism; the uses and abuses of periodization; queer and postcolonial histories; the so-called �end of history�; the slippery category of the present; and finally, the new historical situation of climate change. Throughout the course, we�ll find ourselves grappling with quintessentially modern categories like capitalism, colonialism, progress, and utopia. And we�ll begin to ask how such categories�rather than unfolding neutrally in history�end up producing their own, self-sustaining terms of historical thought. Writers to be studied include Hegel, Marx, Benjamin, Koselleck, Foucault, Althusser, Deleuze, Spivak, Latour, Love, Chakrabarty, Berlant, and Jameson, among others.

More info: marti449@uwm.edu


English 754 : Multicultural Literacies sec 001
Subtitle: An Introduction to Literacy Studies Through First-Person Narratives and Community Experiences of Reading and Writing
Mary Louise Buley-Meissner
Thursday, 4:30-7:10 pm

"This course is designed for M.A. students in the English Department and the School of Education, particularly those with a special interest in literacy studies as a foundation for working effectively with students from diverse ethnic, cultural and linguistic backgrounds. By focusing on first-person and community experiences of learning to read and write, the course addresses key issues related to literacy education in multicultural American society. During the past thirty years, for example, ""the literacy crisis"" has been highly publicized in mass media. Yet relatively little attention has been directed to answering such fundamental questions as these: How is literacy itself being defined? In what specific contexts is literacy being assessed,and for what reasons? When literate/illiterate distinctions are being made, whose interests are being served? Particularly in the public education system, how can students be encouraged not only to acquire nominal literacy (minimal competency in reading and writing), but also to develop active literacy (self-articulated and community-situated awareness of language's rhetorical and cultural power)? As suggested by the selection of course books, class discussion will cover the meanings and consequences of literacy for people in a variety of educational settings, including Hmong refugees in the urban Midwest; Latina/o students in a rural, predominantly white high school; African American students labeled �at risk� in high school and college; and immigrant students in a Chinatown middle school. For a deeper understanding of the personal meanings of literacy, we will delve into the autobiographies of two poets (June Jordan and Jimmy Santiago Baca); a family biography by �a child of war� (Kao Kalia Yang); and a collection of first-person essays by Asian American college students addressing self-formation in higher education."

More info: meissner@uwm.edu


English 813 : Special Topic in Creative Writing sec 002
Subtitle: Writing the Body
Dr. Rebecca Dunham
Tuesdays, 3:30-6:10

This multi-genre creative writing course will focus on both reading texts that explore historical, ethical, and aesthetic ways of writing the body, as well as allow students to produce and workshop their own creative writing. Students will choose the genre(s) they produce texts within. Drama, prose, poetry, hybrid/digital texts -- are all welcome. The anticipated reading list will include Walt Whitman, William Shakespeare, Jeanette Winterson, Virginia Woolf, Lucy Grealy, Mary Shelley, Lucia Perillo, Sappho, and Dana Levin. Students will be required to submit reading responses, comment on one anothers' writing, lead a group discussion, and submit a final portfolio of their creative work at the semester's end.

More info: dunham@uwm.edu


English 858 : Seminar in Professional and Literary Nonfiction sec 001
Subtitle: Mikhail Bakhtin: Text and Subtext
Charles Schuster
Wednesdays, 3:30-6:10 p.m.

"Mikhail Bakhtin: Text and Subtext In this seminar, we will work toward developing a philosophy of language that emerges from theories of literary and nonliterary discourse derived from the work of Mikhail Bakhtin and Valentin Volosinov. Through reading, writing, speaking, and listening we will work hard to grasp more fjully the ways we communicate and comprehend text. Readings will be drawn primarily from Volosinov and Bakhtin, but we will also read both published and nonpublished work which will help anchor our discussions. We will explore various Bakhtinian principles and practices that bear directly on how we understand and evaluate texts, how we think about language as communicative and creative expression. That means we will focus on concepts such as the dialogic, genre, heteroglossia, novel, carnival, addressivity, responsability,and unfinalizability, while staying true to Bakhtinian methodology and resisting the impulse toward explicit definition. Right now, my best hunch is that the texts will be: Marxism and the Philosophy of Language, Valentin Volosinov Problems of Dostoevsky�s Poetics, Mikhail Bakhtin The Dialogic Imagination, Mikhail Bakhtin Speech Genres and other Late Essays, Mikhail Bakhtin A selection from Rabelais and His World, Mikhail Bakhtin A selection of student essays Selections from: John McPhee, Kathleen Jamie, D. H. Lawrence, Jamaica Kincaid, etc. Assignments will incorporate both an oral and a written dimension, which is appropriate given the nature of our subject in this course."

More info: cis@uwm.edu


English 877 : Seminar in Film Theory
Subtitle: U.S. Cinema, 1967 - 1980
Gilberto M. Blasini
Wednesdays, 4:00 - 8:00 PM

The seminar surveys U.S. cinematic practices during a 13-year period that was marked by the emergence of a new generation of directors who reinvigorated filmmaking as an artistic practice linked both to politics and to formal and aesthetic experimentation. This period is commonly referred to as �the Hollywood Renaissance� or �the New Hollywood.� 1967 represents a strategic starting point for the class. This year has been used by some film historians as the beginning of contemporary U.S. cinema in terms of issues affecting both the film industry (the rise of independent filmmaking, the disappearance of the Production Code and its replacement by the rating system, new directions in filmmaking) and the U.S. as a nation in general (the Vietnam war, civil rights movement, women's movement, college students' activism). The seminar will focus on how these films created new cinematic versions of the U.S. as a nation by engaging and reconfiguring the social discourses circulating during the late 60s and 70s. We will examine specific genres and cycles that emerged during this period�e.g., road movies, disaster films, blaxploitation cinema, conspiracy films�as well as others that found reinvigoration during these years�e.g., horror film. In terms of the specificity of cinema as a medium and an art form, we will pay special attention to the construction of narratives and characters, and to questions related to film style (the composition of mise-en-scene, the articulation of space and time through editing techniques, the use of diegetic and non-diegetic sound, etc).

More info: gblasini@uwm.edu


English 885 : Seminar in Critical Theory
Subtitle: New Media Theory and the Dark Side of the Digital
Richard Grusin
Monday 6-8:40

At least since the 1980s, the digital has been the occasion for enthusiastic, often utopian, dreams. In almost every area of human and nonhuman endeavor, digital technologies have been heralded as revolutionary if not redemptive. Much of the development of the field of new media theory has been fueled by digital utopianism. But there has always been a dark side to such enthusiasm�dark places that scholars of the digital and new media theorists tend to overlook as they illuminate new fields and paths; dark practices that intensify social inequalities and accelerate environmental destruction; and dark politics that often remain obscure to global new media users. We will take up critical, theoretical, and creative work that pays particular attention to the conjunction of neoliberalism and socially networked digital media, in order to consider how new media theory and practice can best move forward in the 21st century. The seminar will provide a survey of 20th/21st-century new media theory, focusing on the challenges to its more utopian elements. It will also operate as preparation for C21's spring conference on �The Dark Side of the Digital.� Several of the readings and creative works that the seminar will engage will be selected from scholars who have been invited to speak at the conference, which will provide an excellent opportunity for seminarians to engage with many of the issues that will be debated at the conference in May. In addition to smaller writing assignments throughout the semester, students will each write a seminar paper relating to some elements of new media theory or the dark side of the digital.

More info: grusin@uwm.edu


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Fall 2012

University Online Schedule

English 404: Language, Power, and Identity sec 001 U/G
Patricia Mayes
Wednesday 4:30-7:10

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies. English 404 can be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

Course Materials

  • Lippi-Green, Rosina (2012). English with an Accent, 2nd Edition. Routledge
  • Readings on e-reserve in the library

More info: mayes@uwm.edu


English 415: Fiction Workshop sec 001 U/G
Maurice Kilwein Guevara, maurice@uwm.edu
Wednesday 11-1:40

This class will exercise your critical reading and creative writing abilities in fiction on a regular basis. I will introduce, define, and apply a vocabulary specific to fiction writing: many of the terms you will already know; some will be new. I encourage you to practice these concepts, words, and phrases in our classroom discussions. Please remember that ours is a supportive classroom, where constructive questions and comments are always welcome. I anticipate that you have undergraduate mid-level competence as a fiction writer. More importantly, I assume you want to continue to improve, experiment, and grow as a writer, so that I hope you welcome well-intentioned and sophisticated feedback from me and from your peers.

We will read and write three types of short fiction over the course of the semester: the short story (generally between 1000 and 5000 words), flash fiction (generally less than 1000 words), and hint fiction (25 words or fewer). This comparative reading and writing will allow us naturally to discuss a number of elements involved in fiction writing, including character, pace, plot, atmosphere, voice, tone, imagery, style, etc.

As to required texts, probably the following:
BEST EUROPEAN FICTION 2011 edited by Aleksandar Hemon. $17.95
HINT FICTION edited by Robert Swartwood. $13.95
FLASH FICTION FORWARD edited by James Thomas and Robert Shapard. $15.95

Hope to see you in the fall!

N.B. Perhaps you already know this classic "hint" story by Ernest Hemingway:
For sale: baby shoes, never worn.


English 449: Writing Internship in English 1-4 units; U/G
Rachel Spilka
Monday 4:30-7:10pm
Note that this course will meet just three times in the fall.

This flexible-credit internship is an opportunity for graduate students to gain "real world" writing or editing experience that can supplement their academic credentials and broaden their marketability for postgraduate positions in both academia and industry. Internship placements are available in publishing, public relations/advertising, and non-profit agencies and in larger businesses or corporations. Students might be called upon to complete a variety of tasks in an internship placement, but typically their work involves research, writing, editing, proofreading, and other activities related to communication.

If you are interested in setting up a summer or fall internship, contact Rachel Spilka at spilka@uwm.edu this spring.


English 713-001: Qualitative Research in Writing and Literacy G
Rachel Spilka
Thursday 5:30-8:10pm
This course is available to all graduate students interested in researching topic areas related to writing and literacy. Note that it is offered just once every two years.

Graduate students in English and related fields need to master fundamental research methods to prepare for upcoming dissertation and other empirical work and to maximize their job marketability and potential to "add value" to postgraduate positions in academia and elsewhere. For those heading for academic or workplace careers in professional writing, English 713 will provide core skills needed to excel in these career directions.

This seminar provides thorough instruction in qualitative research in any area of study related to writing and literacy. During the semester, you will examine the philosophies that ground qualitative methods, consider criticisms of this type of research, develop skill in critiquing research designs and identifying rival hypotheses for research findings, and reflect on ethical matters that arise in field research. You will also propose, design, conduct, and report on a small-scale pilot study of writing or literacy in an educational or workplace setting. Most likely, you will spend seven weeks preparing to enter the field, five weeks doing field (pilot study) work, and four weeks analyzing data and preparing a research report.

From this course, you will gain experience in completing the following tasks:

Preparing for a Qualitative Study
  • Define and describe common features of qualitative research.
  • Understand when it is appropriate to conduct qualitative research.
  • Write appropriate research questions for a qualitative study; succinctly state the main purpose of a qualitative study.
  • Select appropriate methods for a qualitative study and provide a convincing rationale for your methodological choices.
  • Learn how to gain access to a research site and plan fully for a research project.
  • Write and submit an IRB (Institutional Review Board) proposal.
  • Understand the primary criticisms, controversies, and ethical issues of this type of research and make deliberate decisions about how to cope with those while planning, conducting, analyzing, and reporting on your study.
Conducting a Qualitative Study
  • Conduct effective observations and interviews; design effective surveys and project log sheets; conduct usability tests.
  • Take effective field notes while conducting qualitative research.
  • Identify field research problems and find reasonable ways to resolve them.
Analyzing and Reporting on Qualitative Data
  • Apply common methods for identifying, charting, and modeling patterns of data you have collected.
  • Learn multiple ways to report qualitative study data; understand rhetorical and ethical issues of those choices.
  • Develop the ability to critique reports on qualitative study; become accustomed to considering rival hypotheses.
  • Learn how to analyze pilot study data and report on it in informative and persuasive oral and written research reports.

For more information, please contact Rachel Spilka at spilka@uwm.edu.


decoration English 716-001: Poetic Craft and Theory: Micro Brews -- Prose Poems, Flash Fiction, and Very Brief Essays G
Maurice Kilwein Guevara, maurice@uwm.edu
Wednesday 5-7:40pm

I welcome all students who are open to growing as writers, readers, and teachers.

I�m quite excited about this course, in part, because its focus on formal brevity/precision requires each of us to think hard about what is essential about a narrative as well as a lyrical moment. The form forces us to think radically about the making of a vessel (recall Faulkner�s "a shape to fill a lack"), and we�ll want to have a few editorial blue pencils ready to excise anything that is superfluous. One of our goals will be to view our early drafts with a cold eye and, although we may be attached to the cleverness of a particular phrase, we need to hear the ghost of Bill Faulkner whispering: "In writing, you must kill your darlings." Another aspect that will make this critical and creative exploration engaging is that we�ll look at three ostensibly distinct micro brews: the prose poem with its connection to the lyric; flash fiction with its family resemblance to the short story; and the very brief essay with its note-like length and its multiple obligations to history, to the lyric, and to a tale well told. In terms of course requirements, there will be weekly readings, discussions, writings, as well as one class presentation and one culminating project that will include some formal research. We will also do writing exercises most every class.

I aim to foster a supportive and insightful community of writers. Students usually find my classes imaginatively and critically wakeful. It doesn�t matter to me if you�re in Creative Writing or one of the other plans in English or in the School of Education or Nursing, etc. What matters is that you�re committed to being part of a genuine community of literary writers.

As to required texts, probably the following:
SAGA/CIRCUS by Lyn Hejinian. $15.95 (CIRCUS is really fun in that it�s an experimental micro-novel.)
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE PROSE POEM edited by Brian Clements and Jamey Dunham. $26.00
HINT FICTION edited by Robert Swartwood. $13.95
FLASH FICTION FORWARD edited by James Thomas and Robert Shapard. $15.95

and one of the following two books (I haven�t yet decided):
IN BRIEF: SHORT TAKES ON THE PERSONAL edited by Judith Kitchen and Mary Paumier Jones. $14.95
SHORT TAKES: BRIEF ENCOUNTERS WITH CONTEMPORARY NONFICTION edited by Judith Kitchen. $15.95

Hope to see you in the fall!

N.B. Perhaps you already know this classic micro brew by Ernest Hemingway:
For sale: baby shoes, never worn.


decoration English 742: Media Culture G
Tasha Oren
Tuesday 3:30-6:10pm

This course serves to engage student in contemporary scholarship, emerging areas of interest, interdisciplinary research, and current debates in media studies. In the first eight weeks we will discuss theoretical essays, screenings, and case studies in film and television studies, digital culture, and popular culture, paying particular attention to argument construction and methodology. In the last few weeks of the semester, as students begin their own research projects, we will work extensively on identifying research questions, honing writing and argumentation skills, presenting work-in-progress in a workshop setting, and producing a draft publication submission.


English 806-001: Seminar in Linguistics: Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis G
Patricia Mayes
Monday 3:30-6:10pm

Part theory, part methodology, this course is designed for graduate students in English and other language arts fields, who are interested in the study of naturally occurring discourse. Since some graduate students may not be familiar with either ethnomethodology or Conversation Analysis (CA), I begin with a brief explanation of these terms.

Ethnomethodology was developed by Harold Garfinkel in the mid-1950s and was influenced by the work of microsociologist Erving Goffman as well as the branch of philosophy known as phenomenology. It focused on revealing how social structures are created and maintained through individual actions, and ultimately influenced the work of Harvey Sacks who subsequently streamlined the focus into the subdiscipline of CA. CA might be described as a branch of microsociology that focuses on social action as revealed through verbal and non-verbal actions (e.g., utterances and gestures). This focus is not only relevant for sociology but for other disciplines that concern language, such as linguistics, anthropology, rhetoric, education, etc. Indeed, over the past three decades these disciplines have demonstrated a growing awareness of the relevance of ethnomethodological and conversation analytic approaches. This is probably due to the strict focus on both empirical evidence and the moment-to-moment emergent nature of individual actions and reactions. It might be argued that emergence is an idea "whose time has come" in part because recent technological developments and social upheavals have made change (and emergence) seem more relevant, but also because of a growing understanding of the dynamic nature of context and its role in shaping human behavior. CA focuses our attention at this level of human behavior.

We will begin by studying the historical development and theoretical underpinnings of ethnomethodology and CA, focusing on some of the seminal works, as well as newer works that show how this field is evolving (e.g., the current focus on institutional discourses). Early in the course, students will be asked to collect some data from a social setting they are interested in. As we go through the course material, we will be applying the theoretical and methodological approaches to these data samples, culminating in a final research project. We will also do periodic "data sessions," -- the CA term for a get-together in which one person brings a data sample that is then examined and discussed by the whole group, a sort of "brain-storming" exercise concerning a particular example of language in use.* The reading materials for this course will consist of scholarly articles either on e-reserve at the library or photocopied as a reading packet.

For more information, please contact Professor Mayes at mayes@uwm.edu

- - - - - -

* Although conversation analysts have traditionally focused on "talk-in-interaction" (i.e., spoken interaction), ethnomethodologists have focused more broadly and include written documents. In addition, some researchers have used CA to analyze newer types of language use, such as text messaging.


English 813-001: Special Topics in Creative Writing: Hybrid Fusions: Creating Inter-arts, Collage, and Trans-lingual Texts G
Brenda Cárdenas
Tuesday 4:30-7:10pm

Some of the most inventive creative texts of our time have fused the visual arts with poetry, collaged various source materials, and moved back and forth with ease between different languages. Consider the verbi-voco-visual works of conceptual poets like Mary Ellen Solt, Steve McCaffrey, and Derek Beaulieu; the palimpsests of Tom Phillips' A Humument and the assemblage of Anne Carson's Nox; Cecilia Vicuña's weavings of polylingual text, installation, and earthworks; Craig Santos Perez's fusions of translingual collage and open-field poetics; the Zaum/Dada meets Nuyorican performance poetics of Edwin Torres; and the digital literature/VizPo of Brian Kim Steffans, Juliet Martin, Young-Hae Chang, Sharon Daniel, and many others.

In this (yes, I'll say it, "everything-including-the-kitchen-sink") studio course, we will work both individually and in collaboration with others to create various hybrid projects (both on and off the page) that explore conditions of mutability, liminality, and rupture by fusing visual and textual elements and by combining multiple languages and/or registers of language.

As we examine published creative and critical works, as well our own works-in-progress, we will consider each project's various elements and how they may be juxtaposed to, layered over, or interlaced with one another; how they may be in conversation with or counterpoint to one another; how they compliment, interrupt, and transform one another; and, of course, what effects these hybridities produce. Primary texts I am considering include Anne Carson's Nox, Terrance Gower and Monica de la Torre's Appendices Illustrations and Notes for The Black Box, Susan Howe's and Susan Bee's Bed Hangings, Douglas Kearney's The Black Automaton, Cathy Park Hong's Dance Dance Revolution, Barbara Jane Reyes' Diwata, Craig Santos Perez's from Unincorporated Territory: Hacha and Saina, Edwin Torres' The All-Union Day of the Shock Worker, Cecilia Vicuña's Saborami, and a number of digital and visual texts available online. I will ultimately pare down this list and welcome student input as I do so. To set contexts for our work, we will also read critical articles and chapters by scholars, such as Alfred Arteaga, Derek Beaulieu, Johanna Drucker, Steven Kellman, W. J. T. Mitchell, Loss Pequeño Glazier, Keith Smith, and Doris Sommer, which will be made available on e-reserve.


English 814-001: Seminar in Irish Literature: Inventing Ireland G
José Lanters
Tuesday 3:30-6:10pm

This seminar takes as its (broad) starting point Declan Kiberd's premise, in his book of the same title, that the Irish "invented" Ireland -- with a little help from the English. How that (self-)image is constructed depends, of course, on who is imagining that Irish community, and to what end. Indeed, Kiberd contends that Irish society has had an extraordinary capacity to assimilate new elements through all its major phases, which bears out the fact that, as he puts it, "identity is seldom straightforward and given, more often a matter of negotiation and exchange."

In this course we will read texts written between the Act of Union and the present day and examine how they reflect changing historical, political, and social circumstances on the island and negotiate the question of Irishness.

Reading list t.b.d but the following authors may be included: Maria Edgeworth, Dion Boucicault, William Carleton, J.M. Synge, Sean O'Casey, Elizabeth Bowen, Flann O'Brien, Edna O'Brien, John McGahern, Tom Murphy, Brian Friel, Patrick McCabe, Hugo Hamilton, Marina Carr, Martin McDonagh, Roddy Doyle.


English 854: Seminar in College Composition, Theory and Pedagogy: Teaching Writing With Digital Technologies G
Anne Wysocki
Wednesday 5:00-7:40pm

The class's subtitle probably misleads, for this is not a class focusing on how to teach with Powerpoint or D2L. Instead, we will consider how networked digital communication technologies play with our understanding of "writing." How therefore might we play with what it is to teach "writing," be a "teacher of writing," shape a "classroom," or responsibly prepare others (as well as ourselves) for future communications? What happens to students, learning, bodies, aesthetics, distance, and rhetoric through such networked play? What counts as "critical"?

In addition to reading a range of texts supportive of our inquiry, we will be "writing" our own texts -- with color, video, animation, and space -- to ground our readings, questions, and arguments. We will explore a range of environments and interfaces -- gaming, immersive, graphic, narrative, non-linear, social, non-western, drill-and-kill -- so that you experiment with the positions and communications (and hence teaching and learning) possible within them.

You need have no particular technological proficiency for this class, but you do need a strong critical perspective to bring to the play. You will keep a reflective journal throughout the class, and will propose(alone or collaboratively) a final project that supports your pedagogical/research interests.

The reading list is likely to include writings from Nancy Baym, Lauren Berlant, Ian Bogost, danah boyd, by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Mary Flanagan, Tracy Fullerton, James Gee, Anya Kamenetz, Jane McGonigal, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Kurt Squire, and McKenzie Wark.


English 855-001: Rhetorics of Science and Medicine G
Scott Graham
Tuesday 5:30-8:10pm

Science and medicine are each part of vastly complex cultural enterprises which include, but also extend far beyond what is done in the laboratory or what happens in scientific journal articles. Scientists, technologists, doctors, patients, regulators, policy makers, journalists, and the general public each interact with and participate in technical, scientific, and medical discourses in a wide variety of ways. English 855 will examine scientific, technical, and medical communication both in the contexts of research and dissemination and in terms of larger cultural and material concerns. The course will provide students with the foundation necessary to explore key problems in rhetorics of science and medicine and how those issues interface with rhetorical studies and technical communication more broadly. Students will read a wide range of scholarship including: 1) canonical articles in the rhetoric of science and medicine 2) related works in technical communication, and 3) cutting-edge texts in science and technology studies. Specific authors include: Annemarie Mol, Bruno Latour, Carl Herndl, Carolyn Miller, Charles Bazerman, Donna Haraway, Jane Bennett, Joseph Dumit, Judy Segal, Peter Galison, and Randy Allen Harris. Students will facilitate one class discussion, write several reading synthesis essays, and compose a final paper of article length.


English 875-001: Seminar in Modern Literature
Becoming modern: gendered narratives
G
Kumkum Sangari
Wednesday 1:00-3:40pm

This course will explore "modernity" as an ensemble of expectations, desires, class and colonial impositions, alternative visions or critiques, and material transformations through the emergence of gendered public spheres in the late 19th and early 20th century. The sites of "becoming modern" include literacy, reading and writing; new women; colonial exhibitionary complexes and civilizing missions; the city and visuality alongside the gendering of urban labor and consumption; and early cinema as a tutelary and phantasmatic public sphere. The texts to be studied, both formally and historically, are drawn from several countries (England, Egypt, Ghana, South Africa, the Caribbean, India, north America), include short stories, dreams, autobiographies, personal narratives, lectures, polemical essays, posters, sketches, films and critical theory. They lead, potentially, into a theorization of the "global modern."


English 876-001: Seminar in Media Culture: Understanding Participatory Media G
Stuart Moulthrop
Thursday 11am-1:40pm

This is a seminar on theoretical approaches to those media and cultural forms that may be described as interactive, ergodic, or participatory: a large category that could include digital writings, videogames, and various forms of social media. Given this focus, the seminar will address the challenge of rapidly evolving, emergent practices, and the difficulty of making scholarly writing answerable to post-print, computational media. A range of approaches will be considered, including traditional cultural studies, New Marxism, Scandinavian neo-formalism, procedural rhetoric, subversive play theory, and applied poststructuralism. Appropriate subjects for research could include games (video- or otherwise), experimental writing practices, virtual communities, trans-media narratives, and any other development with a significant emphasis on participation or co-production.

Requirements include a short paper, a seminar paper (ideally, first draft of an article for journal publication), and an application project, which will involve some engagement with digital technology, and may be undertaken collaboratively. No special technical skills are required.

Possible readings:

This is a tentative list. A final selection will be available when book orders come due, probably in May.

  • Galloway, Protocol
  • Bogost, Unit Operations
  • Perloff, Unoriginal Genius
  • Jenkins, Fans, Bloggers, and Gamers
  • Flanagan, Critical Play
  • Eskelinen, Cybertext Poetics
  • Holmevik, Inter/Ventions
  • Terranova, Network Culture

For more information please contact Stuart Moulthrop at moulthro@uwm.edu.


English 882: Seminar in 19th Century American Literature: Queering Nature G
Richard Grusin
Wednesday 3:30-6:10pm

In the first hundred years of its existence, the United States of America was often understood as "Nature�s Nation." In this seminar we will read key texts of antebellum 19th century American literature with an eye towards queering what it means to think of America as nature�s nation. The course will "queer nature" in several ways. Most of the texts we will read this semester were written by men, and each concerns to various degrees questions of homosociality explored by Eve Sedgwick and other queer theorists; reading Dickinson�s poetry offers another slant on the queerness of nature. In addition, each of the texts we will read "queers" in different ways the concept of nature as distinct from the human, refusing any strict normative or regulative distinction between human and nonhuman nature, particularly in regard to questions of agency, sentience, and spirit. Finally for each of the authors we read, nature is "queer" or "odd" or "weird" -- a source for curiosity, wonder, and amazement.

We will begin with Ralph Waldo Emerson�s important 1836 essay, "Nature." We will then read Herman Melville�s Moby-Dick and Henry David Thoreau�s Walden, Or Life in the Woods. The course will conclude with the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. The class will combine close and careful reading of these extraordinary literary texts with critical, historical, and theoretical readings. The course has several aims: to make you better readers of American literature; to make you better critical writers; and to introduce you to the complex and queer engagement with nature in antebellum 19th century American literature.

Students will write frequent, mainly very short, papers and a final 15-20 page seminar paper. Each student will be asked to do an in-class presentation on an assigned critical work.


English 885-001: The Frankfurt School G
Andrew Kincaid
Thursday 5:30-8:10pm

In the early part of the twentieth century, a group of German and German-Jewish intellectuals grappled with the legacy and questions of Western philosophy. Writing against the emergence of Nazism, monopoly capitalism, and Stalinism, they investigated the inheritance of the European Enlightenment: What is progress? How can knowledge be used for human emancipation? What is the future of philosophy? What are the connections between culture and power, aesthetics and politics? Based initially in Frankfurt, under the auspices of the Institute for Social Research, Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin and others began a series of interdisciplinary studies that would apply these questions to a range of cultural texts: popular and classical music, popular fiction as well as high literary modernism, newspapers, radio, and other mass media. The questions and problems raised by the Frankfurt School developed out of their response to Western philosophy but have continued to dominate and influence contemporary theoretical trends, from poststructuralism through cultural studies and postcolonialism to globalization and media studies. In this course, we will read several of the key texts by members of the first and second generation of Frankfurt School theorists. We will attempt to understand these writings in their own historical contexts, as well as to evaluate the limits of their current applications. Writers to be studied will include Theodor Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Herbert Marcuse, and Jurgen Habermas.


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Spring 2012

University Online Schedule

English 404: Language, Power, and Identity U/G
Patricia Mayes
Tuesday 3:30-6:10

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


English 416-002: Poetry Workshop U/G
Maurice Kilwein Guevara
Thursday 11:00-1:40pm

I welcome all students who are open to growing as writers and readers. This will be a hands-on class, where you will regularly engage in writing exercises; attend a poetry reading and write a review of it; read, listen to, and discuss poems by professional poets, collaborate on a performance poem; and write and revise your own poems-in-progress to be copied, read and analyzed by the class. We'll take a very constructivist approach, always asking ourselves what effects and experiences we hope to evoke in our readers and how we might arrange the language of our poems toward these ends. I aim to foster a supportive and insightful community of poets.

Required texts:

  • Leaves of Grass (1855 edition) by Walt Whitman. Dover Thrift Editions
  • New Goose by Lorine Niedecker
  • Flies by Michael Dickman

English 431: Writing for Social Media U/G
Dave Clark
Online

In this course we will look at social networking, with an emphasis on the practical and theoretical concerns of writers. Students will be expected to read and discuss numerous key mainstream and academic texts, including excerpts from the following:

  • Shirky's Cognitive Surplus and Here Comes Everybody
  • Johnson's Everything Bad is Good for You
  • Surowiecki's The Wisdom of Crowds
  • Lessig's Free Culture
  • Hunt's The Whuffie Factor

They will write and revise several response papers, evaluate and critique an existing social media approach, and design and test a social networking plan for a small organization.


English 442: Writing Center Tutor Practicum U/G, 1 credit
Margaret Mika
Time: TBA

This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.


English 444: Technical Editing U/G
Rachel Spilka
Online

This course is a hands-on practicum in which students are responsible for both individual and collaborative editing projects. Students learn that in work contexts, the scope of editing tasks can vary dramatically: In some cases, editors "fix up" minor grammatical and usage errors (copyediting); in other cases, editors question, "re-envision," and then reshape major aspects of a document such as its purposes, target audiences, content, style, organization, and design (comprehensive editing). The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to handle both copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks—and to edit both hard copy and electronic documents—in future work contexts. A secondary emphasis is on helping students better understand the roles and responsibilities of editors, the ethical dimensions of editing, how editors contribute to document effectiveness, how editors relate to writers during a document's life cycle, and what is involved in becoming a successful editor.

Weekly course assignments are likely to include discussion forum posts on ethical issues and the editor-writer relationship, in addition to "mini assignments" aimed at developing skills and practice in copyediting; relearning (or learning for the first time) the fundamentals of English grammar, spelling, mechanics and usage; and gaining competence in proofreading and editing technical material. Major editing assignments are likely to include copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks on actual work documents in a variety of content areas (such as public policy, science, and health/medicine). A final collaborative course project will involve working in a team to conduct a comprehensive edit on an actual organization's document, website, or set of documents.


English 616-001: The Architectonics of Designing a Collection (Advanced Workshop in Poetry) U/G
Maurice Kilwein Guevara
Thursday 5:00-7:40pm

I welcome all students who are open to growing as writers and readers. This is the capstone course in your undergraduate sequence as a creative writer. The subtitle is "The Architectonics of Designing a Collection." By this, I mean to say that we will spend time thinking about how poets go about the task of taking a rough group of poems and eventually shaping them into a structured poetry collection. We'll study three very different early collections with a particular eye toward thematic and linguistics structures. This course is also available for credit to graduate students. As such there will be a researched component. You will also spend much of the semester composing your own new works of poetry and offering practical criticism on the poems-in-progress written by your peers. I will expect that you have upper-level competence as a poet. More importantly, I assume you want to continue to improve, experiment, and to grow as a writer, so that I hope you welcome well-intentioned and sophisticated feedback from me and from your peers. I aim to foster a supportive and insightful community of poets.

Required texts:

  • Leaves of Grass (1855 edition) by Walt Whitman. Dover Thrift Editions
  • New Goose by Lorine Niedecker
  • Flies by Michael Dickman

English 624: Dangerous Fictions (Seminar in Modern Literature) U/G
Jason Puskar
Wednesday 12:30 PM-3:10 PM

This research seminar studies American fiction's attention to risk and danger, often in novels thought to be dangerous themselves. From violent crime to modern warfare, industrial accidents to infectious disease, American novels have a history of seeking out danger, and many of the books that did so were condemned and sometimes banned.

We will study works by Richard Wright, Nella Larsen, James Cain, and Don DeLillo, as well as Orson Welles's original 1938 radio broadcast of "The War of the Worlds." We will pay special attention to the cultural history of certain kinds of danger, including crime, pollution, natural disasters, and riots. We also will read these novels in relation to recent theories of risk and danger from a variety of disciplines, ranging from anthropology to philosophy. Some questions to be asked: Is fiction more or less dangerous because it is "not true"? How does American culture construct risks and dangers through language? How can we understand the relationship of literature to modern institutions of risk analysis and risk management? This course requires students to complete a guided research project.


English 634: World Englishes (Seminar in English Language Studies) U/G
Patricia Mayes
Thursday 3:30-6:10

The English language now has more than one billion speakers world wide. Many millions speak English as a native language, many more speak English as a second language, but most speak it as a foreign language. Yet, the Englishes spoken by the largest group are considered distinct from traditional "native" varieties of English, and are sometimes referred to as "New Englishes," or "Auntie Englishes," or even "Weird Englishes." This course explores the historical, political, and sociocultural issues associated with the globalization of Englishes, focusing on some of the structural differences of these variaties, but also on the ideological underpinnings of debates about nativization, standardization, identity, and ownership. In exploring these issues through course readings and class discussion we will consider whether aspects of language use can be considered a 'choice,' as is often assumed, or the result of powerful social and political forces. We will also consider how World Englishes are related to common pedagogical problems and concerns in the English language teaching profession.

Likely Text:

  • Schneider, Edgar W. 2011. English around the world. Cambridge University Press.

Possible Texts:

  • Jenkins, Jennifer. 2009. World Englishes: A Resource Book for Students. 2nd ed. Routledge.
  • Phillipson, Robert. 2009. Linguistic imperialism continued. New York and London: Routledge.
  • Phillipson, Robert. 1992. Linguistic imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Other course readings will be chosen from among the following, and placed on e-reserve:
(Note that this means that I may select another [only one more] text from this list or use a few chapters from one or more of these texts. In the latter case, those chapters would most likely be available on e-reserve.)

  • Bruthiaux, Paul. 2009. "Multilingual Asia: Looking back, looking around, looking forward." In Lim, Lisa & Low Ee Ling, eds. Multilingual, Globalizing Asia: Implications for Policy and Education. AILA Review 22: 120-130.
  • Cowie, Claire. 2007. "The accents of outsourcing: the meanings of 'neutral' in the Indian call centre industry." World Englishes 26(3): 316-330.
  • Deumert, Ana and Sibabalwe Oscar Masinyana. 2008. "Mobile language choices: The use of English and isiXhosa in text messages (SMS)." English World-Wide 29(2): 117-147.
  • Hickey, Raymond. 2005. "Englishes in Asia and Africa: Origin and structure." In Raymond Hickey, ed. Legacies of Colonial English: Studies in Transported Dialects. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 503-35.
  • James, Gregory. 2001. "Cantonese particles in Hong Kong students' English e-mails." English Today 67 17(3): 9-16.
  • Jenkins, Jennifer, Marko Modiano and Barbara Seidlhofer. 2001. "Euro-English: Perspectives on an emerging variety on the mainland of Europe, from commentators in Sweden, Austria and England." English Today 17(4): 13-19.
  • Kachru, Braj. 1992. The Other Tongue. University of Illinois Press.
  • Kachru, Yamuna & Cecil L. Nelson. 2006. World Englishes in Asian Contexts. Hong Kong University Press. 93-107 (Chapter 7, "Standards, codification and world Englishes")
  • Lim, Lisa. 2009. "Revisiting English prosody: (Some) New Englishes as tone languages?" In Lisa Lim & Nikolas Gisborne, eds. The Typology of Asian Englishes. Special Issue of Englishes World-Wide 30(2): 218-239.
  • Mesthrie, Rajend & Rakesh M. Bhatt. 2008. World Englishes: The Study of New Linguistic Variables. Cambridge University Press. (Chap 1)
  • Modiano, Marko. 2007. "Euro-English from a 'deficit linguistics' perspective?" Review article. World Englishes 26(4):525-533.

English 710: Advanced Project Management for Professional Writers G
Rachel Spilka
Online

This course will benefit two types of students in particular:

  • Students from any discipline who are seeking to broaden their knowledge base and credentials in project management and professional writing.
  • Graduate students and workplace practitioners who seek a theoretical foundation for the work they are doing or will do in project management, along with advanced practice and skill in this important type of work.
In this course, students will learn effective strategies for:
  • Managing both simple and complex documentation projects for actual clients in work contexts. During the first half of the course, you will collaborate within a small team on managing a single, relatively small-scale documentation project, and during the second half of the course, the entire class will collaborate on planning and managing a complex, large-scale documentation project.
  • Negotiating and learning "best practices" for key stages of the writing process, including the following:
    • Research (including audience research and an initial client interview)
    • Task analysis (based on research findings)
    • Project planning (focusing on identifying goals and constraints and creating planning charts)
    • Project management (focusing on smooth collaboration and problem identification/solving)
    • Project evaluation (including usability testing), revision, delivery, and debriefing

Our textbook will be Stanley Dicks' Management Principles and Practices for Technical Communicators. New York: Pearson Longman, 2004. Other readings will be posted on our D2L course site.


English 720: Modern Literary Theory G
Barrett Kalter
Wednesday 5-7:40 PM

As a body of writings and as a set of principles and practices that orient us toward our objects of analysis in distinctive ways, literary theory cuts across all historical and geographical fields within the discipline of literary studies. This survey of literary theory will therefore provide a foundation for advanced seminars as well as for your own research and future teaching of literature. We'll begin in the eighteenth century, when the convergence of print culture and the public sphere generated a modern literary criticism that served the projects of nation formation and class consolidation by seeking to standardize taste and form a canon. Then we will examine the central schools of criticism that emerged during the twentieth century: formalism (Brooks, Bakhtin), Marxism (Williams, Jameson, Bourdieu), post-structuralism (Derrida, Barthes, Foucault), theories of race, gender, and sexuality (Sedgwick, Butler, Gilroy), and examinations of the post-colonial and the global (Said, Spivak, Casanova). A running question will be, how has the shift in purpose from evaluation to critique transformed criticism and its impact both inside and outside the academy?

The second half of the semester will consider the implications of these theoretical models for the study of literature through an examination of three novels. We will read Robinson Crusoe, Pride and Prejudice, and Peter Ackroyd's Chatterton in conjunction with writings on generic change, character and the invention of interiority, modes of fictionality, and narrative structure. Criticism will include influential treatments of these aspects of the novel as well as fresh approaches to them: thing theory (Brown), the new formalism (G. Stewart), and recent engagements with the sciences, such as narratological analyses that borrow from cognitive psychology (Zunshine) or the data mining that enables a "distant reading" of literary form (Moretti). While allowing us to gauge the value of different kinds of criticism, this range of works will also give us the opportunity to address more practical matters, such as how one might use theory to develop a research methodology and conceptualize a thesis/dissertation topic. Assignments will include an annotated bibliography on a variety of criticism or a critic of your choice (a good head start for exams), a review of a new work of criticism (with an eye toward publication), and two 10-page papers.


English 776: Early Women Writers G
Gwynne Kennedy
Tuesday 5:00-7:40 PM

Women's writings from earlier centuries have received considerable scholarly attention in recent decades, and an informal "canon" of early English, European, and "American" women's writings has emerged. We will read a cross-section of these major writers in this course. The texts span the 15th through the 18th centuries, within early transnational contexts, from England, France, Spain, New Spain, and North America, and multiple genres: defenses of women, drama, fiction, and poetry. Supplemental readings will provide literary, historical, and cultural context.

Several broad questions will connect the readings, including the representation of female authorship and authority, the role of race and gender in constructing national identity, proto-feminist arguments against women's inferiority, and changing ideas about the body, erotic desire, and normative sexuality.

No prior knowledge of the texts or historical background is required. All readings are in English. For students interested in more contemporary women writers, the course offers a valuable historical perspective.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 literature requirement.

Texts will include:

  • Christine de Pizan, from The Book of the City of Ladies (earliest defense of women)
  • Elizabeth Cary, The Tragedy of Mariam (first play by an English woman)
  • Louise Labe, Sonnets (the Petrarchan mistress speaks)
  • Mary Wroth, Pamphilia to Amphilanthus (also a Petrarchan mistress-poet) and Urania (first romance by an English woman)
  • Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (novella) and The Rover (play) (first English woman to support herself commercially as a writer)
  • Margaret Cavendish, The Convent of Pleasure (closet drama)
  • Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz (defense of women, poems, drama) (a nun in New Spain)
  • Katherine Phillips (poems)
  • Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, from Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion
  • Anne Bradstreet (poems)

English 816-001: Poem Series (Seminar in Poetry Writing) G
Brenda Cardenas
Tuesday 4:30 PM-7:10 PM

This course will focus on the creation, critique, and revision of student poems written in series that explore particular subjects/themes and/or forms/approaches (for example, a sonnet cycle, lyric sequence, or series of inter-connected aleatory or collage poems). By working in series and presenting three poems at a time for workshop, students may begin to form sections of their dissertation manuscripts or potential chapbooks. To this end, we will also examine published books comprised of poem series to analyze how the poems in each series compliment, are in conversation with, and are juxtaposed to one another, as well as the tensions and effects that emerge from their arrangements and combinations. With a partner, each student will present questions for and lead discussion on one of the required books (titles TBA). Students will also complete and submit a manuscript of revised poems produced during the semester with a critical introduction that explores the students' poetics, approach and influences in creating this particular project.


English 825: Samuel Beckett: Prose, Poetry and Plays G
Andrew Kincaid
Thursday 5:10 to 8:30 PM

Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) is one of the giants of twentieth century literature. His plays, Waiting for Godot (1948), Endgame (1955), Happy Days (1961), and Krapp's Last Tape (1958), reinvented theatre by pushing the limits of the medium. His drama lacks precise setting, has a minimal plot, and is inhabited by broken characters. The dialogue is often monosyllabic and terse. His plays don't tell a story as much as they are poetic and symbolic attempts to stage memory, time, life and death. His dramas are both disliked and worshipped, but they have entered the canon as modern masterpieces. And they are not without their humor, often slapstick and silly. Beckett's prose, too, is both modernist and experimental, moving from the Joycean-inspired wordplay of Murphy (1935) to the internal, rambling, broken narrators of Molloy (1947) and the later short prose pieces, such as Stirring Still (1989) and First Love (begun 1946). Beckett wrote for radio, too. Embers (1957) and Rough for Radio (1961) are intricately detailed plays that use background sounds, silence, music, and taut, structured dialogue not only to examine the possibilities inherent in the form of radio (its immateriality, sound editing, voiceovers, etc.), but also to develop his recurring themes of loss, life's purpose, hope and survival.

He wrote and developed a film, entitled Film (1963), for Buster Keaton. Beckett's range of medium, therefore, is part and parcel of what we now might call performance art, a lifelong ahead-of-the-curve effort to push art, both form and content, into new directions. While his experimentations are avant-garde and difficult, they are not indulgent works of art for art's sake; Beckett, while not an activist, was political, and he saw literature and theatre as means to express, detail, and uphold human dignity, to get audiences to reflect on the needy and the outcast (Waiting for Godot found a willing audience at San Quentin prison), on human cruelty, on torture, on bureaucracies and the arrogance of those who claim to know answers and push solutions.

His name, like Kakfa's, has entered everyday language as a term used to express a certain outlook of life. "Beckettian" refers to a world that appears to consist of pointless or misunderstood communication, that seems to lack purpose and direction, and yet, in the midst of despair, we survive, find inner strength, and continue to look for hope and salvation. A Beckettian world is dark, but not unforgiving. And we see evidence of his writings in many aspects of popular culture, from Seinfeld, a show, like Waiting for Godot, about nothing, to the often cited last lines of The Unnameable (1949), "I can't go on. I'll go on."

Part of the attraction of Beckett for readers lies in his use of minimalist language and forms. His works are symbolic, and because little action happens on stage or in text, everything becomes potentially significant. There is a great freedom of interpretation in Beckett. He never argues about why the world is the way it is, and he himself never attempted to explain the meaning of his works, stating once that he "refuse[d] to be involved in exegesis of any kind." Beckett did not, then, seek to provide definitive answers. Rather his works challenge our expectations: what do we do with a text that is open, free to us to read how we will, a work that is difficult both in its 'obscurity,' but also in its simplicity? This openness means, of course, that Beckett's oeuvre has been interpreted through many lenses: political, psychoanalytic, religious, postcolonial, and existentialist. In reading Beckett we have an opportunity not just to explore an author whose life spans most of the twentieth century, but also the chance to negotiate different literary theories, to see how academia has treated an author who famously avoided the spotlight, and to consider what is at stake in interpretation. In short, reading Beckett allows us to consider basic questions in English Studies today: Why read? How should we read? What's at stake, what matters about the conclusions we draw from a piece of literature?

Readings to include, but not limited to:

  • Drama:
    • Waiting for Godot
    • Endgame
    • Happy Days
    • Krapp's Last Tape
    • Breath
    • Catastrophe
  • Prose
    • Murphy
    • Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnameable
    • "Dante and the Lobster"
    • First Love
    • Stirrings Still
  • Radio Productions:
    • Embers
    • Rough for Radio II
  • Cinema:
    • Film
  • Poetry:
    • Whoroscope
    • Echo's Bones
    • Dieppe
    • My way is in the sand flowing
    • What would I do without this world
    • I would like my love to die
Secondary Reading:
  • Anthony Cronin: Samuel Beckett: The Last Modernist
  • Oppenheim, Lois, ed. Samuel Beckett Studies. Palgrave Macmillan. 2004

English 853: Philosophical Bases of Contemporary Rhetorical Theories: Issues, Concepts, and (Some) Major Figures G
Dennis Lynch
Monday 3:30 PM-6:10 PM

The course will be structured around three interrelated sets of issues informing the field of rhetoric and composition. These issues arise from the shift in the mid-twentieth century in rhetorical studies from notions of persuasion to notions of identification (and from rhetorical effect to symbolic action); this shift has raised questions about the scope of rhetoric and the ability of traditional rhetorical concepts to account for embodiment and for non-cognitively, non-linguistically mediated experience. Our issues/concepts and possible readings will therefore be:

  1. Persuasion, Identification, and Subjectivization (Burke, Zizek, and Foucault)
  2. Ethics and the Scope of Rhetoric (Perelman, Leff, Butler)
  3. Pathos and Purpose/Invention/Production (Heidegger, Nussbaum, Hanson, Massumi, Rickerts)

English 855: Rhetoric of Technology G
Dave Clark
Tuesday 5:30-8:10

"Rhetoric of technology" is a slippery term and, even more than "rhetoric of science," is a hard-to-define category of literature that spans science studies, anthropology and sociology of science, cultural studies, and rhetoric and professional writing. What unites the texts is a common assumption that technologies are inseparable from the rhetorics that describe, promote, and of course document them, and that it can be useful to conceive of technologies as tools with rhetorical constructions and implications. In this course, we will read across the category, including texts from such authors as Susan Leigh Star, Gary Downey, James Gee, Glynda Hull, Dorothy Winsor, Steven Shapin, Charles Bazerman, Bruno Latour, Pierre Bourdieu, and Andrew Feenberg. Students will write weekly responses, and will write several short essays that will contribute to their production of an article-length final paper.


Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies (JAMS) 860: Video Games (Seminar in Media Studies) G
Michael Z. Newman
This class will meet on Thursdays from 5:00-7:40 pm for seminar (discussion), and on Mondays from 7:00-8:00 pm for a game lab, which will usually meet at the library.

Note to Plan H graduate students: this is an MA level course (as JAMS courses do not conform to our course numbering system) and an elective, not an 800 level media seminar.

In this course we will consider video games as a technology, industry, cultural form, and set of social practices. We will also survey game studies as an emergent academic field with backgrounds in many disciplines. Students will be expected to play a variety of games, to read extensively in the literature of game studies, and to formulate an original research project which will become a final paper. My interest in games is primarily as a subject for cultural history, but this course will also look at video game criticism and theory. Students are encouraged to pursue any approach to their research that appears useful and appropriate. One way of looking at games is as a form of new media, and particularly as an instance of convergence of technologies, in particular audiovisual technologies such as TV, cinema, and computers. This will be one way of approaching video games. But to many writers, digital games are also a medium unto themselves, and their distinctness from other media is also a matter for serious consideration. Among the specific topics likely to be considered are:

  • The early history of video games and the establishment of their cultural identity.
  • The spaces of play and the significance of gaming in everyday life.
  • The association of gaming with identities, particularly those of age and gender, and dynamics of power inherent in such cultural constructions.
  • Gaming as an practice situated in communities, online and offline.
  • Gaming as a product of advanced capitalist industry and culture.
  • Video games as a textual, aesthetic form.
  • Game genres such as first-person shooter, rhythm game (e.g., Dance Dance Revolution, Guitar Hero), and simulation; games as remediations of practices such as shooting, musical performance, and earlier forms of play like boardgames and D&D, and of genres of popular culture such as science-fiction and fantasy literature and film.

Readings for this course may include (books may be assigned in whole or just as excerpts):

  • Tom Bissell, Extra Lives: Why Video Games Matter (Random House, 2011).
  • Ian Bogost, Unit Operations: An Approach to Video Game Criticism (MIT, 2006).
  • Alexander Galloway, Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture (Minnesota, 2006).
  • James Paul Gee, "Why Game Studies Now? Video Games: A New Art Form," Games and Culture 1 (2006): 58-61.
  • Henry Jenkins, "'Complete Freedom of Movement': Video Games as Gendered Play Spaces" in The Wow Climax: Tracing the Emotional Impact of Popular Culture (NYU, 2006).
  • Jesper Juul, Half Real: Video Games between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds (MIT, 2005).
  • Sheila C. Murphy, "'This is Intelligent Television': The Emerging Technologies of Video Games, Computers, and the Medium of Television," How Television Invented New Media (Rutgers, 2011).
  • T.L. Taylor, Play Between Worlds: Exploring Online Game Culture (MIT, 2006).


English 875 (Seminar in Modern Literature) Becoming modern: gendered narratives G
Kumkum Sangari
Wednesday 12:30-3:10 PM

This course will explore 'modernity' as an ensemble of expectations, desires, class and colonial impositions, alternative visions or critiques, and material transformations through the emergence of gendered public spheres in the late 19th and early 20th century. The sites of 'becoming modern' include literacy, reading and writing; new women; colonial exhibitionary complexes and civilizing missions; the city and visuality alongside the gendering of urban labor and consumption; and early cinema as a tutelary and phantasmatic public sphere. The texts to be studied, both formally and historically, are drawn from several countries (England, Egypt, Ghana, South Africa, the Caribbean, India, north America), include short stories, dreams, autobiographies, personal narratives, lectures, polemical essays, posters, sketches, films and critical theory. They lead, potentially, into a theorization of the 'global modern.'


English 885-001: Critical Race Theory and Cultural Studies G
Gregory Jay
Monday 4:30 PM-7:10 PM

This graduate research seminar will explore the field of "critical race theory" and its applications in the study of literature, film and media, education, and culture. The definition of the field remains broad, including investigations of the social and historical construction of race and the articulation of such constructions through legal, political, pedagogical, aesthetic, and cultural practices. New developments in critical race theory have included critical whiteness studies, queer theoretical analyses of race, and comparative racialization studies within a postcolonial context.

Students from all disciplines and departments are welcome. Early in the semester, each seminar student will design and submit a proposal for an individual research project on a topic or problem of their choice. Completion of the research project, typically resulting in a paper aimed at publication, will be the primary assignment for the semester. The readings for the course will be used to establish key concepts and issues useful to students as they undertake their research. The selection of texts for the course could include such texts as:

  • Richard Delgado, Critical Race Theory: An Introduction
  • Richard Delgado and Jean Stefanic, eds., Critical White Studies: Looking Behind the Mirror
  • Paul Gilroy, Against Race: Imagining Political Culture Beyond the Color Line (or Gilroy, Postcolonial Melancholia)
  • Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark
  • David Eng, The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy
  • E. Patrick Johnson and Mae Henderson, eds, Black Queer Studies
  • Toure, Who's Afraid of Post Blackness?

We will also read essays from the Special Issue of PMLA on Comparative Racialization (Vol. 123, no. 5: 2008).


English 885-002: The Nonhuman Turn G
Richard Grusin
Wednesday 3:00 PM-5:40 PM

This seminar takes up the "nonhuman turn" that has been emerging in the arts, humanities, and social sciences over the past few decades. Intensifying in the 21st century, this nonhuman turn can be traced to a variety of different intellectual and theoretical developments from the last decades of the 20th century: actor-network theory, particularly Bruno Latour's career-long project to articulate technical mediation, nonhuman agency, and the politics of things; affect theory, both in its philosophical and psychological manifestations and as it has been mobilized by queer theory; animal studies as developed in the work of Donna Haraway, projects for animal rights, and a more general critique of speciesism; the assemblage theory of Gilles Deleuze, Manuel DeLanda, Latour, and others; new brain sciences like neuroscience, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence; new media theory, especially as it has paid close attention to technical networks, material interfaces, and computational analysis; the new materialism in feminism, philosophy, and marxism; varieties of speculative realism like object-oriented philosophy, vitalism, and panpsychism; or systems theory in its social, technical, and ecological manifestations. Such varied analytical and theoretical formations obviously diverge and disagree in many of their aims, objects, and methodologies. But they are all of a piece in taking up aspects of the nonhuman as critical to the future of 21st century studies in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

Running roughly parallel to this nonhuman turn in the past few decades has been the "posthuman turn" articulated by such important theoretical works as Katherine Hayles's How We Became Posthuman and Cary Wolfe's What Is Posthumanism? Thinking beyond the human, as posthumanism is sometimes characterized, clearly provides one compelling model for 21st century studies. But the relation between posthumanism and humanism, like that of postmodernism to modernism, can sometimes seem as much like a repetition of the same as the emergence of something different. Thus one of the questions that this seminar will take up is the relation between posthumanism and the nonhuman turn, especially the ways in which taking the nonhuman as a matter of critical, artistic, and scholarly concern might differ from, as well as overlap with, the aims of posthumanism.

The seminar will operate as well as preparation for the C21 spring conference on "The Nonhuman Turn in 21st Century Studies." Several of the readings will be from scholars who have been invited to speak at the conference, which will provide an excellent opportunity for seminarians to engage with many of the issues that will be debated at the conference in May. In addition to smaller writing assignments throughout the semester, students will each write a seminar paper relating some elements of the nonhuman turn to their own areas of interest in their graduate research.



Fall 2011

University Online Schedule

English 404: Language, Power, and Identity sec 001 U/G
Patricia Mayes
W 3:30 - 6:10 pm

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


English 414: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 001 U/G
Subtitle: Whitman's Children
Susan Firer
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Course description (doc 26k)


English 431: Topics in Advanced Writing sec 201 U/G
Subtitle: Professional Writing for Nonprofits
Sally Stanton
Online

This course explores the theory, practices, lore, and written communication used by professional writers in nonprofit or social sector workplaces, such as theatres, museums, libraries, social service agencies, art centers, humane societies, and other community organizations. Students will:

  • Learn the purpose and defining characteristics of the nonprofit sector.
  • Understand the critical role of written messages in communicating social sector values and results.
  • Explore persuasive writing strategies for nonprofits (including case statements, donor and constituent messages, and proposal-related communications).
  • Adapt business communication theories and strategies to the nonprofit sector.
  • Apply sector-specific theory and approaches to producing annual reports, websites, social media, grant reports, and unique documents such as artist statements and resumes, exhibition catalogs, and advocacy materials.

Students will gain practical experience in researching, designing, and writing documents commonly prepared by nonprofit professionals. Assignments will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis, and collaboration.


English 433: Creative Nonfiction for Publication sec 001 U/G
Carolyn Washburne
W 4:30 - 7:10 pm

In this course, students will write in a number of creative nonfiction formats, including the personal experience article, personal opinion essay, review, and profile, as well as a researched article using a creative nonfiction approach. The course will explore using fiction and poetry techniques, such as metaphor, dialogue, voice, and point of view, to make the nonfiction writing more eloquent and compelling. The course will also cover how to get nonfiction work published. To illustrate the principles being discussed, the class will critique published articles and evaluate each other's work in peer editing sessions and class workshop discussions.


English 435: Professional and Technical Writing sec 001 U/G
Nancy Nygaard
Online

This course is an orientation to the work and field of professional and technical writing. Students will develop foundational skills in researching, planning, drafting, and revising common types of workplace documentation as they complete individual and collaborative projects for either hypothetical or actual clients. Students will also gain skill in adapting documents for different types of audiences and analyzing writing projects rhetorically, contextually, and from a problem-solving perspective. One important segment of this course will be about job and career preparation; as students learn about "best practices" for job networking, interviews, and site visits in this field, they will develop their own electronic resumes, cover letters, and writing portfolios.


English 439: Document Design sec 001 U/G
Anne Wysocki
TR 4:00 - 5:15 pm

In this class we focus on producing documents that work: given the audience for whom you are creating a document, and given the purposes you hope to achieve with that audience, what strategies—of layout; size and material; typography; use of photograph, illustration, chart, or diagram; readability and usability—are appropriate? In other words, this is a course in the rhetoric of document design. Through producing and analyzing many different kinds of print documents (from simple, text-only single page layouts to multi-page instruction sets), you will learn how to work with differing current expectations about the strategies named above. This course is appropriate for all students with an interest in or need to produce documents for professional contexts. Students from all plans and majors are welcome.


English 442: Writing Center Tutoring Practicum sec 001 U/G
Margaret Mika

This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.

In many ways, learning to tutor well is a baptism-by-fire enterprise requiring hours of on-the-job practice. This course provides Writing Center tutors with a foundation of concentrated study and supervised practice from which to begin. Therefore, the first two-thirds of class will be frontloaded, i.e., conducted before the semester starts and 3 weeks before the Writing Center opens. We will meet for 10 hours over two days during the week prior to the first day of classes and again for 1.5 hrs, one Friday each month to complete the course requirements. As important as these formal classes will be the many day to day opportunities for tutors to talk with the director, the graduate assistant coordinator and fellow tutors once the Center opens.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required to enroll. Students must have attained junior status, successfully completed the Writing Center application process and hired as a prospective Writing Center tutor. All majors, especially non-English, are welcome.


English 443: Grant Writing sec 201 U/G
Sally Stanton
Online

Grant Writing combines richly descriptive storytelling and subtle persuasion within technical limits established by potential charitable funders of these organizations. The practical skill of preparing clear, concise grant proposals is valued and desired by employers in higher education, engineering, science and medicine, human services, the arts, and cultural institutions.

In this class, students will learn the basics of researching and writing effective, persuasive grants, and will then develop and apply that knowledge in an integrated service-learning project with a community-based nonprofit organization. They will learn how to research and analyze the sources of charitable funding information available to Milwaukee area organizations and how to effectively organize and present that information for writing grants. Students will leave this course with marketable skills and a greater knowledge of the ways in which effective communication adds value to the workplace.


English 445: Composing Process sec 001 U/G
Subtitle: Teaching Composing Processes
Alice Gillam
MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

This course is designed to introduce pre-service teachers to composing process theories and pedagogies as part of their preparation for teaching writing. Clearly, no single course, particularly one that does not include actual practice, can adequately prepare future teachers for the complexity and challenges of teaching writing. However, this course aims to begin that process by:

  • introducing theories and debates related to the teaching of writing that can, in turn, serve as critical lenses for teaching and reflecting on practice;
  • suggesting a repertoire of pedagogies that can be adapted and transformed to suit various classroom situations; and
  • offering opportunities to develop and reflect on your own writing practices and identity as a writer.


English 454: Milton sec 001 U/G
Gwynne Kennedy
MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

The primary reading for the course will be John Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost, an enormously influential literary text. We will also read some of Milton's other poems and prose. The most substantial work we will do in the course is reading Paradise Lost—not easy, but very rewarding. It is a text best read in a group, rather than alone, so class discussion plays a large role. There will be weekly short responses, midterm and final exams, and a short paper.


English 709: Writing, Rhetoric and Information Technology sec 201 G
Dave Clark
Online

This course explores theories, practices and tools used by professional documentation specialists. Our topics will include knowledge management, information architecture, information design and of course instructional writing. While designing and producing individual and group projects, students will have the opportunity to gain both theoretical and practical experience with designing and writing tools, processes and languages. Projects will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis and usability testing, and collaboration. This course does not assume any prior technical expertise, and students from all plans and majors are welcome.


English 715: Narrative Craft and Theory sec 001 G
Subtitle: Creative Nonfiction
Liam Callanan
M 12:00 - 2:40 pm

"Creative Nonfiction" has come to mean many different things, both in and out of workshop classrooms. Of late, it's come to mean, specifically, personal essays (and even more specifically, memoir). This course, however, will have a broader focus: we will read (and write) literary journalism, long-form feature journalism, scholarly work, memoir, and yes, the personal essay. The expected make-up of this class—serious writers—drives its goal: serious writing.


English/MALLT/History 740: Approaches to the Modern I sec 001 G
Mark Netzloff
M 4:30 - 7:10 pm

Course description (doc 29k)


English 743: Introduction to Film Theory and Criticism sec 001 G
Tami Williams
W 3:30 - 7:30 pm

This course is a survey of classical and contemporary film theory. It is designed specifically for graduate students interested in expanding their understanding of film and media studies. It provides an in-depth introduction to the history of the field (including the history of film theory, debates about film and the other arts, film and reality, film and the spectator), providing a theoretical basis for approaches to film analysis. It also considers recent innovations in the field, and the increasingly complex and convergent relationships amongst film and media in an era of globalization.

Required texts:

  • Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. Oxford University Press, 7th edition preferred.
  • Reinventing Film Studies. Eds. Linda Williams and Christine Gledhill. Arnold Publishers, 2000.
  • Course reader available at Clark Graphics (2915 N Oakland Ave).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course is part of the new track in Media, Cinema and Digital Culture.


English 761: Discourse Analysis sec 001 G
Patricia Mayes
M 3:30 - 6:10 pm

Course description and texts (doc 78k)


English 776: Women Writers sec 001 G
Subtitle: American Poets Elsewhere
Jason Puskar
T 3:30 - 6:10

This seminar is an intensive study of three American women poets, all of whom write with a heightened sense of spatial or historical dislocation, a sense of being "elsewhere": H.D. (1886-1961), Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), and Louise Glück (1943-). Together, these poets span a full century of American writing, from the birth of high modernism to the present, and they exhibit a wide range of temperaments, politics, and styles. A patient of Sigmund Freud, H.D. combined the insights of psychoanalysis with the traditions of nineteenth-century aestheticism. Rukeyser was a committed communist, disinherited by her wealthy family, but she wrote just as compellingly about the politics of the personal. Glück pioneered a new idiom of post-confessional austerity, dense with accumulated mythologies and haunted by her remarkably ethereal voice. Their dislocations are various too. H.D. emigrated to England and later Switzerland, while Rukeyser wrote compellingly of the Spanish Civil War. Just as often, their travels were imaginary. H.D. and Glück make poetic journeys within the Homeric legends; Rukeyser dreams of air travel and the experience of flight; Glück identifies with the underground lives of plants. Together, these three writers exhibit many of the key phases of twentieth-century poetry, even as the work of each one helps illuminate that of the others.

Texts:
  • The Collected Poems of Muriel Rukeyser, ISBN0822959240 $28
  • H.D.: Collected Poems, ISBN9780811209717 $25
  • Four volumes by Louise Glück (to be determined), estimated cost: $45

    • English 812: Seminar in Theories of Composition and Rhetoric sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Feminist Rhetorical Theory
      Alice Gillam
      W 4:30 - 7:10 pm

      Andrea Lunsford describes the aim of feminist scholarship in rhetoric as "not an attempt to redefine a 'new' rhetoric, but rather to interrupt the seamless narrative usually told about the rhetorical tradition and to open up possibilities for multiple rhetorics, rhetorics that would not name and valorize one, traditional, competitive, agonistic and linear mode of rhetorical discourse but would rather incorporate other, often dangerous moves" (Reclaiming Rhetorica 6). In this class, we will "interrupt" the rhetorical tradition in four ways that roughly correspond to those proposed by Krista Ratcliffe in Anglo-American Feminist Challenges to Rhetorical Traditions. Specifically, we will:

      • examine feminist rereadings of canonical classical texts,
      • study feminist projects to reclaim rhetorica,
      • analyze non-rhetorical feminist texts to extrapolate rhetorical theory from their practices, and
      • consider recent conceptualizations of rhetorical theory from feminist perspectives.

      Our purpose will not to be to derive a single coherent feminist rhetorical theory or to embrace a single methodological approach but rather to consider the debates, diversity, and ongoing questions regarding the means and ends of feminist rhetorical studies: what is rhetorical theory and what work can/does it do in the world? what does it mean to call a rhetorical theory "feminist" or a feminist theory "rhetorical"? what are the implications of feminist rhetorical theories for us as scholars and teachers?


      English 813: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Social * Media * Writing
      Stuart Moulthrop
      T 11:00 am - 1:40 pm

      This seminar/workshop examines consequences for creative identity, literary culture, and the practice of writing, arising not so much from emerging technologies per se, as from their participation in various reconfigurations of the social. While we will engage specific social media—Facebook, Twitter, Google, wikis, virtual environments, among others—this is not simply a course in writing for digital networks. Though we may experiment with concepts like crowdsourcing, community authorship, writing games, and other forms of reception-as-production, we will focus mainly on the role and identity of the writer in a time of increasing connectedness.

      The course has two major objectives: (1) to expand possibilities for expression that question or transform traditional literary solitude; and (2) to map within those possibilities promising areas for research, critical analysis, and pedagogy. You should expect to finish with, at very least, new approaches to writing, and conceivably with innovative publishable work. You should also discover possible ideas for scholarship and teaching that could confer significant advantage in the job market. For more information, go to http://tinyurl.com/SMWriting.


      English 878: Seminar in Feminist Critical Theory sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Cultural diversity, multiculturalism and globalization: gendered debates
      Kumkum Sangari
      W 1:00 - 3:40 pm

      Is cultural diversity synonymous with multiculturalism? What produces cultural diversity?

      This course works towards a critique of multiculturalism based on exclusivist, primordial and normative notions of culture, religion and race. It will explore the feminist debate on multiculturalism, try to disentangle market-centred notions of multiculturalism, and work towards a different understanding of diversity in both national and transnational arenas. It will focus on modes of exclusion and containment as well as on social and economic processes of diversification through a discussion of caste, class, religion, race, labour, market, migration, nation, state and patriarchies. The course sets out to explore and understand the social processes that have produced as well as suppressed diversity within old colonial and new global regimes.

      All readings for this course will be available through Library E-reserve.


      English 855: Seminar in Theories of Business and Technical Writing sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Issues in Quality, Audience, and Usability
      Rachel Spilka
      M 5:30 - 8:10

      This course examines the history, theories and practical applications of theories that surround issues of quality and audience in the field to technical communication. Special attention is paid to approaches over the past forty years to determining how writing within and across professional contexts can help achieve "quality" by meeting the needs of stakeholders and especially target internal and external audiences of documentation. Through class discussions, workshops and practice-based assignments, students examine, critique, and identify promising theory- and practice-based approaches—past, present and yet to be developed in the future—of measuring and achieving quality of technical communication. Examples of such approaches are cognitive psychology principles, document design guidelines, user engagement guidelines, readability measures, quantitative metrics and usability methods. An important goal of this course is to identify how technical communicators might build on promising past and new approaches in order to model (more accurately) the modern (digital and global) multiple audience and then seek ways to collaborate or partner with that audience toward higher levels of "quality" and "success."


      English 885: Seminar in Critical Theory sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Psychoanalysis, Gender, Sexuality
      Jane Gallop
      M 3:30 - 6:10

      In this course, we will consider the place of psychoanalysis in Feminist and Queer Theory. We will read influential theorists rethinking gender and/or sexuality with and through psychoanalytic theory: e.g., Chodorow, Irigaray, Butler, Bersani, Freud.

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      Fall 2011 – other

      University Online Schedule

      Learning from New Orleans G

      • Architecture 585: Research Methods in Architecture | Arijit Sen | F 9:00 - 11:40 am
      • Architecture 533: History/Theory: Global History of Urban Disasters and Rebuilding | Manu Sobti
      • Architecture 825: Comprehensive Studio | Harry van Oudenallen | TRF 1:30 - 5:20 pm
      • Architecture 645/855: Studio on Urban and Community Design Theory | Arijit Sen | TRF 1:30 - 5:20 pm

      The Learning from New Orleans course bundles four different courses for an integrated study of social justice, urban history, urban politics and urban culture. By focusing on New Orleans as a case study this class carefully studies the politics of urban rebuilding, the role of citizens in this process, and the historical nature of such processes. The course also explores how participatory design can (or can't) involve various stakeholders in the rebuilding of cities.

      Course Structure: There are three kinds of courses. Students can take one of more courses to suit their interest. However architecture students taking 6-credit studio are required to take the 3-credit research methods course and the history/theory course in addition to the studio. Non-architecture students are invited to take one or more courses to suit their disciplinary interest. They can take the research methods and/or history/theory course or do an in-depth research project in New Orleans. Non-architecture majors may choose to participate in the design studio via a directed study co-instructed by their advisors or course instructors.

      Course Content: In the research methods class students will learn how to analyze and make sense of information gathered from census, cartographic, archival, ethnographic and environmental sources. A focused study of how race, gender, ethnicity and other forms of identities frame the urban experience will also be part of the research methods class. In this class students will learn how to read and analyze the built environment as a cultural artifact.

      The history/theory course will introduce students to urban rebuilding and disaster politics in cities across time and geographies. Case studies will include cities outside the United States.

      In the studio courses students will apply the knowledge gained in the research methods course by producing strategic, urban, and architectural interventions. Non-architecture students enrolled in the studio may produce heritage maps, urban history analysis, oral histories, documentary films and other forms of documentation and knowledge relevant to their field of study.

      Course Objectives: This course focuses on and distinguishes design from other forms of research and practice seen in the social sciences and the natural sciences. Design involves a humanistic understanding of social, material, cultural, political, economic and environmental circumstances of human habitation and this knowledge results in informed interventions in the city. This process will require students to look for patterns and systems that underpin the physical and social reality of what they are studying. In this case it is the Lower Ninth Ward and surrounding impacted areas in New Orleans.

      This class follows a teaching strategy called Problem-Based-Learning (PBL) where resolving real life problems are planned into the curriculum in ways that promote higher-level cognitive learning. PBL is a teaching method that is best applied in the study of complex knowledge domains such as culture and architectural design where there is no single scientific answer or resolution. It also allows students to apply and evaluate complex information that they encounter during research directly into their design. On completion of this class students will gain the following skills:

      1. An ability to collect empirical data and do field work.
      2. An awareness of ethnographic, archival, architectural, observational, and ecological data collection strategies and an understanding of interpretive, qualitative and correlational analysis. An ability to collect, analyze, synthesize and evaluate material and social data.
      3. An ability to craft a thesis statement and produce an appropriate program of inquiry.
      4. An ability to evaluate and apply information.
      5. An ability to take an informed position on the politics of urban rebuilding and urban culture.

      This is a Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Course. For more information, please contact Dr. Arijit Sen at senA@uwm.edu.

      Summer 2011

      English 404: Language, Power, and Identity sec 091 U/G
      Patricia Mayes
      MTWR 1:00 - 3:30 pm
      7/25-8/20

      This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


      English 711: Topics in Professional Writing sec 251 G
      Subtitle: Writing for Social Media
      Dave Clark
      Online 6/27-7/23

      This course will be an intense, four-week look at social networking, with an emphasis on the practical and theoretical concerns of writers. Students will be expected to read and discuss numerous key mainstream and academic texts, including excerpts from the following:

      • Shirky's Cognitive Surplus and Here Comes Everybody
      • Johnson's Everything Bad is Good for You
      • Surowiecki's The Wisdom of Crowds
      • Lessig's Free Culture
      • Hunt's The Whuffie Factor

      Students will write and revise several response papers, evaluate and critique an existing social media approach, and design and test a social networking plan for a small organization.

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      Summer 2011 – other

      French 401: French for Reading Knowledge sec 291 U
      Rachel Ney
      Online 7/25-8/20

      This course is for students with little or no previous knowledge of French and is especially useful to graduate students fulfilling a language requirement.


      Spanish 499: Spanish for Reading Knowledge sec 251 U
      Nancy Bird-Soto
      Online 6/27-7/23

      This course is for students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish and is especially useful to graduate students fulfilling a language requirement.

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      Spring 2011

      English 328: Forms of Experimental Literature sec 201 U/G
      Subtitle: Monstrous Progeny
      Dr. Stuart Moulthrop
      Online

      This class takes the idea of "experimental literature" somewhat broadly. We will work through several texts that engage unconventional or emerging media: the graphic novel Watchmen, as well as the hypertext fiction Patchwork Girl and the video games Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Watchmen: The End Is Nigh. However, we will also look at three films derived from novels, and thus will address that more familiar type of "experiment" that results from any media crossing. Media and mediation are core concerns of the course.

      Taking our cue from Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, we will focus on "monstrous progeny" – a richly evocative phrase. In Mrs. Shelley's original sense, the term refers to literary production itself: the artificial life of characters, circumstances, and stories that haunts writers and readers like a returning dream. What gives certain stories the power to spread beyond their initial telling into new contexts and forms? This movement suggests a second resonance, focused more on medium than message. Here we take human inventions, particularly media of communication, as realizations of the uncanny: simultaneously familiar and strange, alluring yet unsettling, even "monstrous." What happens to literary expression as it passes through various laboratories of cinematic illusion (from classical Hollywood to modern CGI), then into still more radical experiments like hypertext and video games? What is the relationship between literature and other media forms? How should we think, as students of literature, about the progeny (monstrous or otherwise) of subsequent invention?

      While this course is not rigorously historical, skipping from a product of the early 19th century to two from the late 20th, it does open discussion of certain threads in our cultural tapestry, particularly those monsters in our midst. Shelley's creature, Adams' various aliens-as-Englishmen, and Moore's postmodern superheroes, all offer variations on this theme. The course invites your thinking about fantasy, the gothic, and the whole notion of genre, especially as these subjects impinge on questions of mediation and re-making.

      Ultimately, though, this class will itself be something of an experiment, or a dialogue between my own thinking about these texts and your ideas and inventions. It will best succeed if you find interesting worlds to explore, in and around the assignments.

      Preliminary syllabus (doc 683k)


      English 360: The Art of Poetry sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Poets on Their Art and Craft
      Dr. Rebecca Dunham
      TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

      This course will investigate 20th century poets' interviews and essays on the craft of poetry, and consider these ideas in relation to their own original work. Our reading list will include works by Yusef Komunyakaa, Heather McHugh, Eavan Boland, and Mark Doty. Students will be graded on a presentation, a final essay/interview, reading responses, and in-class participation.


      English 383: Cinema and Genre sec 202 U/G
      Subtitle: Horror Films, 1960-1985
      Dr. Gilberto Blasini
      Online

      The course surveys the gradual transformation of horror films—mostly but not exclusively in the U.S.—from B-movie status to a popularly and critically praised genre during the 25-year period between 1960 and 1985. The release of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho in the U.S. and Michael Powell's Peeping Tom in the U.K. in 1960 marks a transition in terms of thematic, ideological and narrative approaches to conveying horror filmically. The historical changes that took place after 1960 (the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal, the women's movement, the sexual revolution, the civil rights movement, the end of the Hays Code and the appearance of the MPAA ratings system, among others) further transformed the cinematic configuration of the horror genre, giving many directors the opportunity to create socially relevant and aesthetically challenging texts that were able to engage a wide variety of audiences (e.g., the youth, African Americans). We will study a number of filmmakers who emerged as horror auteurs during these years—Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Brian de Palma, Larry Cohen, Tobe Hooper, and David Cronenberg. In addition, we will explore some of this period's horror subgenres: demonic entities/possessions, science-makes-nature-run-amok, and the slasher/stalker films. In order to understand the social relevance of these films as cultural artifacts, the course will pay close attention to these films' relationship to their historical context. Thus, we will examine how these films engage discourses related to gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationality.

      Warning: The purpose of the class is to understand the horror genre critically. If you cannot tolerate gore, violence, and profanity, or if any of the topics and issues depicted in these films go against your moral or religious beliefs, you should not take this course. There are plenty of other Film Studies courses that would be a better fit to your interests and way of life. In addition, if you are interested in horror films only from the standpoint of a fan or movie buff, this course will not fulfill your expectations. For more information, contact the instructor at gblasini@uwm.edu.


      English 436: Writing for Information Technology sec 201 U/G
      Dr. Dave Clark
      Online

      This course explores theories, practices, and tools used by professional documentation specialists. Our topics will include information design, instructional documentation, and content management, among many others. While designing and producing projects, students will have the opportunity to gain both theoretical and practical experience with designing and writing tools, processes, and languages. Projects will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis and usability testing, and collaboration. This course does not assume any prior technical expertise, and students from all plans and majors are welcome.


      English 452: Shakespeare sec 001 U/G
      Dr. Mark Netzloff
      TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

      This course provides an intensive critical study of Shakespearean drama. Our discussions will concentrate on a close reading of seven plays—The Taming of the Shrew, Twelfth Night, Henry V, Titus Andronicus, Macbeth, King Lear, and The Winter's Tale—along with an analysis of the texts' literary, theatrical, and historical contexts. Because Shakespeare wrote his plays for performance rather than publication, we will pay particular attention to the cultural importance of the early modern theater. In addition, we will examine the ways these texts have been reinterpreted over time by looking at the plays in performance and on film.

      Texts for the course (you may use alternative editions instead):

      Shakespeare, Four Comedies (Bantam) [includes The Taming of the Shrew and Twelfth Night]
      ---. Four Tragedies (Bantam) [for Macbeth and King Lear]
      ---. Henry V (Bantam)
      ---. The Winter's Tale (Oxford)
      ---. Titus Andronicus (Oxford)

      A course packet will also be available at Clark Graphics that will feature the critical readings for the course (est. cost, $20). The total cost of all course materials will be between $50-60.


      English 465: Women Writers sec 002 U/G
      Subtitle: Women Writers Before Austen
      Dr. Gwynne Kennedy
      MW 9:30 - 10:45 am

      Who were some of the women who wrote and published before Jane Austen? There are in fact far too many for a single course, even within one country, so we will read a variety of writings from diverse places and centuries. They include: the first play by an English woman (Elizabeth Cary's The Tragedy of Mariam) and the first biography of a woman, written by Cary's daughters, defenses of women and women's education by Christine de Pizan in France, Sor Juana de la Cruz in Spanish Mexico, and Mary Wollstonecraft in England, sonnets by English, French, and Italian women, plays by Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn, and prose fiction by Behn and Mary Wroth (the first romance in English). The course will also track three issues through the readings: attitudes toward women's literacy and education, female sexuality, and spiritual authority, paying particular attention to how these are framed at different times and locations.


      English 501: Studies in Literature, 1500-1660 sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: English Renaissance Drama
      Dr. Mark Netzloff
      TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm

      This course provides a survey of English dramatic literature of the early modern period. As the designation early modern suggests, our discussions will emphasize the role of these texts in the formation of key literary and cultural attributes of the modern age. The public theater itself, for instance, provides the earliest example of a mass medium, a form of popular culture that addressed a spectrum of class groups and reflected on a range of political matters. And the concerns represented on the early modern stage resonate in our own time as well: from the cultural effects of an increasingly globalized world, in terms of early histories of colonialism and emerging ideas of race, to the place of gender, sexuality, and the household as cultural battlegrounds in a period of economic instability. Especially crucial to our discussions will be the literary and performance contexts of these plays, and we will examine such topics as the emergence of the professional writer and models of authorship, the effect of print culture on performance-based texts, and, most importantly, the plays themselves in performance, with screenings and clips of stage productions and film adaptations.

      We will discuss nine dramatic texts in all: Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Edward II; Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, and The Tempest; Jonson's Bartholomew Fair and The Masque of Blackness; Middleton's The Roaring Girl; and the anonymous "tabloid" play Arden of Faversham.

      Texts for the course (you may use alternative editions instead):

      Anon., Arden of Faversham (New Mermaids)
      Jonson, Bartholomew Fair (New Mermaids)
      Marlowe, Doctor Faustus and Other Plays (Oxford)
      Middleton, The Roaring Girl (Norton)
      Shakespeare, Hamlet (Bantam)
      ---. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Bantam)
      ---. The Tempest (Bantam)

      A course packet will be available at Clark Graphics that will feature Jonson's Masque of Blackness along with critical readings for the course (est. cost, $20). Including the course packet, the total cost of course materials will be approximately $75.


      English 625: Seminar in Literary History sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Eating English Lit
      Dr. Barrett Kalter
      TR 2:00 - 3:15 pm

      This seminar in literary history considers writing about food during England's "long" eighteenth century (1660-1820), an era that stretches from the opening of the first London coffeehouses to the origin of the science of gastronomy. Our aim will be to create a detailed picture of how food was produced, experienced, and imagined in this period, and to that end we will read a variety of texts: poetry and fiction, philosophical essays, medical pamphlets, economic treatises, and of course cookbooks. For example, we will situate Grainger's The Sugar Cane, a poem about the West Indian sugar industry, within the context of British colonialism and slavery, before investigating the role affordable sweetness played in the rise of consumer society and the development of theories of taste by Burke and Hume. Other topics to be discussed: British beef and the formation of a national cuisine; Shelley's vegetarianism as an aspect of his radicalism; famine and population in Swift and Malthus. Students will prepare dishes using eighteenth-century recipes in order to explore the possibilities of knowing the past through the senses. Finally, because historical thinking involves making connections between past and present, we will read recent work by chefs and food writers such as Michael Pollan, Anthony Bourdain, and Barbara Kingsolver, and reflect on how their interests are anticipated by or depart from those of the eighteenth century.

      This is a new course and editions have not yet been selected. I estimate the cost of course books, if purchased new, at around $50.


      English 633: Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Rhetoric and Everyday Life
      Dr. Alice Gillam
      M 3:30 - 6:10 pm

      If, as Kenneth Burke suggests, rhetoric is "the use of language [defined broadly to include visual and other nonverbal forms of communication] as a symbolic means of inducing cooperation [or communication] in beings that by nature respond to symbols," then rhetoric is an inescapable part of our everyday lives. Indeed, Aristotle went so far as to suggest that since everyone uses rhetoric, those who understand it can control those who do not. In short, this course introduces you to the study of rhetoric and its everyday applications. We do so by considering four general topics:

      1. What is rhetoric, and what does its study and practice entail?
      2. What are its uses in civic realm?
      3. In local community life?
      4. In the realm of popular culture?
      In the latter three units, we will focus on a particular case or cases of civic, community, and popular cultural practice.



      English 634: Seminar in English Language Studies sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Language and Gender
      Dr. Patricia Mayes
      W 3:30 - 6:10 pm

      Robin Lakoff's seminal article, "Language and Woman's Place," argued that the language women use, for example, hedges (sort of and I guess) and tag questions (It's great, isn't it?), has, in part, been responsible for excluding them from positions of power and authority. This argument claims that in essence language is a tool of oppression through which the gender norms that keep women in their place are continuously reenacted. Although many people still believe that gender consists of a set of immutable characteristics and that the way we use language merely reflects these, this course will challenge these ideas, as we examine the role of language in constructing gender identities. We will begin by examining how several feminist theories have dealt with the relationship between language and gender.

      We will also look at how various methodologies have been used to research this topic, beginning with quantitative studies in sociolinguistics and moving to the current focus on language use in communities of practice. Other questions to be explored include how gender ideologies interact with other social constructs such as culture, age, ethnicity, sexuality, and social class. Students do not need previous training in linguistics, sociology, or gender studies.

      Course description and book list (doc 80k)


      English 706: Seminar in Professional Writing Theory and Pedagogy sec 001 G
      Dr. Dave Clark
      T 5:30 - 8:10 pm

      In this course we will explore the theory and application of various approaches to teaching business and technical writing in colleges and universities and in the non-academic workplace. To do so, we will explore pedagogical theories; examine and evaluate textbooks, assignments, and other course materials; and discuss online, face-to-face, and hybrid instruction. We will also investigate and assess key genres of business and technical writing, including reports, proposals, job application materials, and presentations.


      English 754: Post-Secondary Composition-Topics in Pedagogical Theory sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Multicultural Literacies
      Dr. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner
      R 6:30 - 9:10 pm

      Course description, readings and requirements (pdf 139k)


      English 778: Native American Literature sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Native Story
      Dr. Kimberly Blaeser
      R 3:30 - 6:10 pm

      Students in this course will explore Native American story and storytelling from various time periods and in several genres. We will examine the works in the context of the Indigenous communities from which they emerge and trace their intertextual relationships to the canons of American or world literature. As we survey a range of works including fiction, autobiography, and poetic narrative, we will work to understand the function and survival of Native literatures in the 21st century.

      Our study will include an examination of literary style and technique and their relationship to what has been understood as a Native storytelling aesthetic. Readings will include creative works from a range of authors including Linda Hogan, Simon Ortiz, Sherman Alexie, D'Arcy McNickle, Louise Erdrich, Gerald Vizenor, Leslie Silko, Joy Harjo, Tom King, Louis Owens, Zitkala Sa, Pauline Johnson, Carter Revard, N. Scott Momaday, Wendy Rose, Luci Tapahonso, and Gordon Henry as well as critical and analytical essays on Native literature. Students will have the opportunity to select and study one additional book-length work not read by the class as a whole.

      Updated draft syllabus (doc 36k)


      English 813: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Introduction to Screenwriting Workshop: the Story
      Dr. Tasha Oren
      T 3:30 - 6:40 pm

      The course is a hybrid workshop/critical introduction to the principles and conventions of screenwriting, story analysis for film, and basics of script craft. In the first part of the semester we will explores contemporary principles and conventions of story construction and development for the screen, and analyze examples through screenings, published screenplays and story-creation workshops and exercises. In the second half of the term, students will work on their own screenplays in a collaborative workshop environment.

      No screenwriting experience, knowledge, or long-term ambition is required.


      English 816: Seminar in Poetry Writing sec 001 G
      Subtitle: The Elegy
      Dr. Rebecca Dunham
      W 3:30 - 6:10 pm

      The elegy as a poetic form has a long history, stretching from Antiquity to the present. Traditionally, the function of the elegy is to respond to the experience of loss, whether through lament, praise, or consolation. Its history as a public form, and its more recent inward turn, creates a unique site where the two intersect. Over the course of the semester, we will read collections by several contemporary poets, such as Anne Carson, Matthew Zapruder, and Natasha Tretheway, as we explore current incarnations of this traditional form.

      In addition to writing poems which "arrive" in the course of the semester, I will ask you to write one poem that wrestles with some aspect of our subject. You will be responsible for one group presentation on a contemporary poet and his/her connection to the elegiac tradition. While we will open class each week with a discussion of the readings or to your presentations, the majority of our class time will be devoted to workshop.


      English 854: College Composition, Theory and Pedagogy sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Satisfactions and Sorrows of Writing Program Administration
      Dr. Charles Schuster
      W 3:30 - 6:10 pm

      This course is intended to situate you within the discipline of English Studies as well as the administrative, bureaucratic, budgetary, political, ideological world of university decision making. During the course of the semester, we will examine various issues, topics, and debates primarily centered on: how writing programs operate; how English departments make decisions (about hiring, curriculum, the major, etc.); how writing programs and English departments function within the wider world of the college, the university, and the state; how rhet/comp and other graduate students can succeed in the job market; how assistant professors become full professors; the roles and responsibilities of deans and provosts; how conference papers, scholarly articles and book proposals get vetted, especially in Composition Studies; how budgets get shaped and reshaped; how college and university priorities affect instruction—that is, precisely those kinds of policies and practices that matter a great deal but are largely invisible to most graduate students (and faculty!).

      More specifically, we will consider (depending on your interest and what's happening at UWM and nationally) the nature of English departments, the history and ideology of first-year composition, writing program administration, literature vs.(?) composition, programmatic planning, negotiating with the dean, the rhetoric of the job application process/faculty search, the role of the associate dean, academic publishing, and (if we haven't run out of breath and energy) building for yourself a professional portfolio. I expect that we'll have some guest speakers, and discuss various readings. Primarily, however, I am thinking of this course as a 15-week extended workshop. That means I will be asking you to write in various modes and forms. We will also do some role playing, and I will likely ask you to attend some College and University meetings so that you can get a taste of what it means to participate in UWM beyond simply teaching and doing individual research. We may even try to do a field trip, if there is interest and if we can make arrangements with a nearby institution.

      Of course, as in any grad seminar, I'll be assigning reading. Some of what I assign will be on Electronic Reserve; some will be handed out in class or made available online. Tentative reading list:

      Diana George, Kitchen Cooks, Plate Twirlers & Troubadours, Heinemann-Boynton/Cook
      Richard Russo, Straight Man, Vintage
      Sharon Crowley, Composition in the University, U. Pittsburgh Press

      All should be available at UWM Bookstore, and we will be reading sizable chunks of them and discussing them in class. For those of you in composition (and anyone else who is interested), I will also ask you to subscribe to the WPA listserv. You can either receive every post or subscribe to the digest. To learn how to subscribe, point your browser to: http://wpacouncil.org/wpa-l.


      English 877: Seminar in Film Theory sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Third Cinemas
      Dr. Gilberto Blasini
      M 4:00 - 7:50 pm

      The seminar looks at the different iterations that the term "Third Cinema" has had during the last five decades, both in Latin America (where the term originated), and in the US and England. From its inception, Third Cinema was constituted as a type of political and cultural intervention in societies whose formations have been directly affected by the power struggles and oppressions that the processes of colonialism and imperialism bring with them. In order to understand these processes, the course closely looks at works by Frantz Fanon and Edward Said, and their respective analysis of discourses related to racism, colonialism and imperialism. This larger framework will allow us to grasp the writings and manifestos that specifically deal with questions related to Third Cinema and its connection to culture and politics in any given society. First, we will examine the articulation of cinematic theories and practices in post-1950s Latin America—such as Solanas and Getinos Third Cinema in Argentina, García Espinosa's Imperfect Cinema in Cuba, and Rocha's Aesthetics of Hunger in Brazil. This examination will help us trace the reception and recontextualization of these theories in US and British academia (particularly through the work of scholars such as Teshome H. Gabriel, Stuart Hall, Korbena Mercer, Hamid Naficy, B. Ruby Rich, Ella Shohat and Robert Stam), where Third Cinema became both "Non-Western Cinema" and "Third World Cinema" before returning to its initial name.

      Starting on week 7, part of our intellectual undertaking will be to interrogate the different forms that Third Cinema has taken in the Anglophone academic environment from the mid-1980s onwards (diasporic and exilic cinema as well as accented cinema, to name a few). Some of the questions that we need to keep in mind while pursuing this undertaking are: What are the continuities and discontinuities that exist between the original term and the new iterations of Third Cinema? Has the concept gained or lost specificity (or both) in the academic context? How have the political and economic changes of the last 25 years transformed Third Cinema as well as the possibilities for its existence? Is Third Cinema still a political cinema even if it is not directly connected to specific cinematic movements (such as the New Latin American Cinema)? Can we still talk about Third Cinema in the new millennium? How has the current era of globalization affected Third Cinema?

      Screenings emphasize filmic texts from Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition, the seminar includes examples from Asia and Africa, as well as films from diasporic artists who make films under the "new" geopolitical coordinates engendered by the contemporary stage of globalization.


      English 883: Seminar in 20th Century American Literature sec 001 G
      Subtitle: The 1930s
      Dr. Jason Puskar
      T 12:00 - 2:40 pm

      This course examines the literature of the 1930s in social, political, and historical contexts. It concentrates on novels, but also includes poetry, photography, and film, all of which it uses to investigate this period of tremendous political turmoil, rapid technological change, and continuing innovation in literature and the arts. Writers include William Faulkner, Nathanael West, Myra Page, Djuna Barnes, Muriel Rukeyser, and Richard Wright, among others.

      The course will pay special attention to period theory and criticism, and also to key historical developments, including the growth of the American Communist Party, the consequences of the New Deal, changing configurations of race, class, and gender, and new directions in American intellectual life. The course is organized chronologically, but it also will ask more theoretical questions about how and why we should study literature through history, or history through literature. Students will gain a thorough knowledge of major movements in the literature of this formative decade, and also exposure to the practices of historically engaged literary and cultural criticism.

      Readings will include:

      William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying (1930)
      William Wellman, The Public Enemy (1931)
      Busby Berkeley, The Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)
      Erskine Caldwell, Tobacco Road (1932)
      Erskine Caldwell and Margaret Bourke-White, You Have Seen Their Faces (1937)
      Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts (1933)
      Dashiell Hammett, The Thin Man (1934)
      Henry Roth, Call it Sleep (1934)
      Myra Page, Moscow Yankee (1935)
      Djuna Barnes, Nightwood (1936)
      John Dos Passos, The Big Money (1936)
      Zora Neal Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
      Muriel Rukeyser, US 1 (especially "The Book of the Dead") (1938)
      Richard Wright, Uncle Tom's Children (1938)
      John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath (1939)


      English 885: Seminar in Critical Theory sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Theories of Mediation
      Dr. Richard Grusin
      W 5:30 - 8:10 pm

      It is generally accepted that we are living through an explosion of print, televisual, and socially networked media forms and practices the scope of which is unprecedented in world history. The term "new media" is in common parlance, and media studies, new media theory, media archaeology, and other related academic fields have proliferated in the past two decades. My own work, particularly Remediation: Understanding New Media (co-authored with Jay David Bolter) and Premediation: Affect and Mediality after 9/11, has played a part in the growth of these fields.

      In this seminar we will pursue the concept of mediation at work in these discourses by exploring a variety of mainly 20th and 21st century theories of mediation. We will begin with Hegelian and Marxist theories of mediation, particularly as manifested in the work of the Frankfurt School (especially Benjamin, Kracauer, Adorno, and Horkheimer). We will also take up psychoanalytic theories of mediation before turning to the work of McLuhan and other media theorists from the sixties through the eighties. We will also take up the theories of mediation and translation in the work of Bruno Latour, before turning to the major works of new media theory in the last decade of the 20th and first decade of the 21st century.

      The aim of the class is not only to pursue in depth some of the most important theories of mediation in the 20th and 21st centuries, but also to provide graduate students preparing to embark upon their own major research projects with one model of how to pursue such a project. Each student will keep a blog which will draw connections between each week's readings and examples from our current media environment. Students will be asked to develop a research project that explores theories of mediation in relation either to their own research interests or to the larger concerns of the seminar.

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      Spring 2011 – other

      Linguistics 748: Oral Language, Cognition, and Literacy sec 201 G
      Dr. Roberta Corrigan
      Online

      The course will examine how and why language and cognitive development are important for the acquisition of literacy skills. This course is open to graduate students who have had a college-level course in language acquisition or reading or child development or linguistics.

      Sample course topics include: What are the psychological and linguistic bases of speaking, reading, and writing in children who are typically developing? How is literacy affected when children are learning more than one language or dialect? Are there cognitive advantages to knowing more than one language? How do language, cognition, and literacy interact in children with language disorders?

      For more information, please contact Dr. Bobbi Corrigan, Professor of Linguistics, at corrigan@uwm.edu.


      Architecture 790: Practicum in Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures sec 006 G
      Dr. Arijit Sen
      R 5:30 - 8:10 pm

      Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures (BLC) is an interdisciplinary research area concentrating on the examination of the physical, cultural, and social aspects of the built environment. BLC serves students enrolled in the architecture and history of art doctoral programs at the UW Milwaukee and Madison campuses respectively but is open to any graduate or upper-level undergraduate student interested in learning more about the built environment. This course explores past and present approaches to the historical study of architecture and cultural landscapes. Course work includes field application and learning from the analysis of local buildings, landscapes and cultures. For more class details, see http://blcnewsupdates.blogspot.com/.

      In this class, students will examine the quotidian built environment by supplementing theoretical readings with actual hands-on projects. One such collaborative class project will study the urban cross section along the path of Bus 15 from Mayfair Mall to Water Street and write histories of consumer culture along that route. The class with work with Historic Milwaukee, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to increasing awareness of and commitment to Milwaukee's history, architecture and the preservation of our built environment. This project will expand our understanding of historical and cultural inquiry beyond the analysis of written records, texts, biographies, art, photography and folklore to include the physical evidence of the built environment.

      Primarily borrowing from material culture studies this course also adapts methods and theories used in sub-fields such as environmental history, cultural landscape history and public history. Building on the foundations presented in this class, students are encouraged to pursue their specific interests in art history, architecture and planning, landscape architecture, geography, anthropology, folklore, cultural studies, urban studies, and urban history in subsequent semesters.

      Last year's syllabus and student work are available on the BLC website under "Common Course": http://www.blcprogram.org/research/teaching/class-projects/.


      Graduate Studies 803: Teaching & Learning in College sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Reflections on Theory and Practice
      Dr. Connie Schroeder, Assistant Director of the Center for Instructional and Professional Development
      M 3:00 - 4:15 pm

      In this seminar, graduate students will explore different perspectives on the nature and purposes of college teaching. They will examine learning theories and pedagogical techniques in order to better understand how students learn, situating these theories and techniques in their historical context and in light of current pressures for change in higher education. Through weekly, critical reflection on evidence-based instructional practices, students will identify both institutional and personal values and beliefs underlying the practice of teaching. They will construct a philosophical statement on teaching and create a course portfolio that demonstrates their ability to create course goals, design syllabi, implement assessment strategies, and integrate technology that is learner-centered.

      Intended to complement departmental, discipline-based pedagogy courses, training, and mentoring, this course helps future faculty members critically reflect on teaching and learning and make informed instructional and pedagogical choices.

      Prior students taking this course said that they learned:

      "... to think constantly about how students are learning."
      "... how to design a learner centered course."
      "... the learning objectives are crucial; they are the foundation of your course."
      "... the importance of being specific in my syllabus—what do I really want students to do? Also, the importance of implementing assessment that shows you where students are so you can change the course if necessary."
      "I don't need to change the curriculum overnight. I can take small steps to change the way I teach and then communicate that to others."

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      Fall 2010

      English 404: Language, Power and Identity sec 001 U/G
      Professor Patricia Mayes
      W 3:30-6:10 pm

      This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


      English 414: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 002 U/G
      Subtitle: Texts for Performance
      Professor Brenda Cárdenas
      W 11:00 am-1:40 pm

      In this course, we will compose texts intended for live performance, such as spoken word/performance poems (including collaborative, voice-choreographed pieces), dramatic monologues, image theater pieces, one-act plays, and experimental performance art works. To achieve this purpose, we will complete various in-class writing and improvisation (including movement and voice) exercises, as well as read, view, and listen to sample pieces by professional performance poets/artists. We will also draft and revise scripts and scores as assignments and bring them to class to be critiqued by our classmates who will offer suggestions for how we might best craft our pieces to achieve the desired effect. Although no previous experience is required, you will be expected to present your pieces to the class.


      English 442: Writing Center Tutoring Practicum sec 001 U/G 1 unit
      Margaret Mika

      This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.

      Students may enroll only with instructor's permission and must be advanced undergraduate (junior or senior) or graduate students who have successfully completed the Writing Center application process and been hired as prospective Writing Center tutors.

      In this course, students will:

      • prepare for 4-hours/week (minimum) tutoring practice in UWM's Writing Center
      • be introduced to theoretical and practical basics of tutoring in a writing center
      • be introduced to the professional community of writing centers including the policies and practices of the International Writing Center Association (IWCA)
      • have the opportunity to self-assess and reflect on their tutoring and writing skills

      In many ways, learning to tutor well is a baptism-by-fire enterprise requiring many hours of on-the-job practice. This course provides Writing Center tutors with a foundation of concentrated study and supervised practice from which to begin. Therefore, the first approximately two-thirds of class hours will be frontloaded, i.e., held before the semester starts and the Writing Center opens. We meet for 9 hours over 2 days during the week prior to the first day of classes and again for 1.5 hours one Friday each month to complete the course requirements. Just as important as these formal class meetings will be the many day to day opportunities for tutors to talk with the director, the graduate assistant coordinator and fellow tutors once the Center opens the 3rd week of the semester and tutoring services begin.


      English 504: Studies in Literature, 1660-1800 sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: The Enlightenment Novel
      Professor Barrett Kalter
      MW 2:00-3:15 pm

      The novel originates in the eighteenth century, the "age of enlightenment." How can we understand the simultaneous and mutually-informing development of these two crucial components of modernity? In this course, we will read major works of eighteenth-century British fiction in light of the key concepts of enlightenment philosophy: reason, progress, individualism, and equality. Our aim will be two-fold: to explore how these concepts were illustrated, promoted, and contested in novels, and to understand the particular features of the novel that made the form an especially effective vehicle for enlightenment thought. We will also want to discuss the value of enlightenment principles and their bearing on our own time. Should we now strive for what the eighteenth century called enlightenment?

      Novels to be read: Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Swift, Gulliver's Travels; Johnson, Rasselas; Sterne, A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy; Austen, Pride and Prejudice.

      Philosophers to be read: Bacon (on empirical knowledge); Locke (on liberty, slavery, and property); Hume (on reason and emotion); Smith (on sympathy); Wollstonecraft (on gender and equality); Kant (on critique).


      English 616: Advanced Workshop in Poetry sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Structures and Constraints
      Professor Brenda Cárdenas
      R 3:30-6:10 pm

      In this capstone workshop, we will explore the effects that various forms (from traditional to experimental) and constraints, including self-imposed limits, have on our poems and our writing processes. We will pay particular attention to how such structures and procedures might serve to make our poems more imaginative, musical, economical, and nuanced. To this end, we will write in formal verse (syllabics, sonnets, villanelles, pantoums, Sapphic stanzas, and the like), as well as experiment with constraints in such Oulipo and aleatory forms as lipograms, palindromes, anagrams, and those of our own invention. To accomplish this, we will read a variety of published texts, complete in-class writing exercises, draft and revise poems outside of class, and bring poems to class to be critiqued by our classmates who will offer suggestions for how we might best craft our poems to achieve the desired effect.


      English 622: Seminar in Irish Literature sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Drama from Yeats to McDonagh
      Professor José Lanters
      T 3:30-6:10 pm

      In the early years of the Irish Revival period at the beginning of the twentieth century, the Abbey Theatre produced great playwrights like J.M. Synge and Sean O'Casey, but by mid-century, a variety of cultural and political forced had conspired to remove most of the excitement from Irish drama. In the 1960s, as the cultural and political climate began to change, younger playwrights like Brian Friel and Tom Murphy moved Irish theatre out of the doldrums with works that were emotionally complex, theatrically engaging, and thematically relevant to what was happening in Irish society.

      Beginning with the "grand old men" of the Abbey Theatre, this course will explore a number of the most successful, challenging, and, at times, controversial playwrights who followed in their wake. In addition to discussing the relationship between form and content of the plays, and paying attention to aspects of their production in the theatre, we will place them in their cultural, historical and critical context with the aid of supplementary reading materials in a course packet.

      Students will be assessed on two papers, a class presentation and class participation.


      English 626: Seminar in Critical Theory sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Affect and Media in Theory and Fiction
      Professor Richard Grusin
      M 12:30-3:10 pm

      This seminar takes up two modes of theoretical investigation of current interest, Affect Theory and Media Theory. The syllabus pairs works of affect and media theory with three important contemporary novels: we will read Walter Benjamin's "Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" and Marshall McLuhan's The Medium is the Massage with Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49; Raymond Williams' Television and Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulations with Don DeLillo's White Noise; and Brian Massumi's Parables for the Virtual and my own Premediation with William Gibson's Pattern Recognition. Students will be expected to write three papers, one on each of the three pairings of theory and fiction.


      English 627: Seminar in Literature and Culture sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: The Suburban Imagination
      Professor Jason Puskar
      TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm

      More Americans live in the suburbs than in the country and the city combined, but suburban novels often have been overshadowed by their urban and rural cousins. Not here. This course studies American fiction about the suburbs from the 1870s to the present, with emphasis on the period following World War II. We will pay special attention to the history of the suburbs as built environments, to the emergence of suburban culture, and to ongoing debates about the merits and demerits of suburban living. The course includes material drawn from urban planning, architecture, television sitcoms, sociology, critical theory, and recent histories of suburbia and sprawl. Literary authors include Sinclair Lewis, John Cheever, Gloria Naylor, and A.M. Homes. Our goal will be to understand how suburbia has shaped American fiction, but also how American fiction has shaped various conceptions of suburbia.


      English 713: Qualitative Research in Writing and Literacy sec 001 G
      Professor Rachel Spilka
      T 5:30-8:10 pm

      Graduate students in English and related fields need to master fundamental research methods to prepare for upcoming dissertation and other empirical work and to maximize their (a) job marketability and (b) potential to "add value" to postgraduate positions in academia and elsewhere. This seminar provides thorough instruction in qualitative research in any area of study related to writing and literacy.

      During the semester, you will examine the philosophies that ground qualitative methods, consider criticisms of this type of research, develop skill in critiquing research designs and identifying rival hypotheses for research findings, and reflect on ethical matters that arise in field research. You will also propose, design, conduct, and report on a small-scale pilot study of writing or literacy in an educational or workplace setting. Most likely, you will spend seven weeks preparing to enter the field, five weeks doing field (pilot study) work, and four weeks analyzing data and preparing a research report.


      English 715: Narrative Craft and Theory sec 001 G
      Professor Valerie Laken
      Subtitle: True Stories
      M 4:30-7:10 pm

      In this course we will study the ways in which elements of real life--from historical event to personal experience--are shaped and adapted into both fiction and nonfiction texts. We will discuss the practical, stylistic, and ethical challenges writers face when borrowing material from real life, and we will analyze the ways in which a label of fiction or nonfiction alters readers' expectations for the truth, verisimilitude, and artistry of a text. By studying recent scandals arising from such labeling (e.g., James Frey, J.T. LeRoy, Herman Rosenblat) as well as treatises on the artificiality of the boundary between fiction and nonfiction (e.g., David Shields's Reality Hunger), we will debate the usefulness of the distinction between fiction and nonfiction. Students will be required to write and workshop their own fiction or nonfiction texts derived from real events.


      English 761: Discourse Analysis sec 001 G
      Professor Patricia Mayes
      M 3:30-6:10 pm

      This course is an introduction to discourse analysis and is designed to provide graduate students in English and other language arts fields (e.g., linguistics, anthropology, education, sociology, information studies, etc.) with a basic theoretical and methodological foundation for the study of naturally occurring language. "Discourse analysis" is considered an interdisciplinary field that involves examining how particular structures are linked to meaning in conventionalized ways. However, it involves more than just close examination of linguistic form; attention is also given to the largely unconscious, nuanced meanings that are tied to sequencing within discourse.

      Although our focus will be on spoken and written English, the methods and general principles can be used to study discourse in other languages and in many different contexts. From a theoretical perspective, we will discuss the role of discourse in creating social institutions and identities, as well as debates within the field involving whether the analyst's role should be merely descriptive or more critical. From a practical standpoint, students might use the knowledge they gain in a number of ways. A creative writer might use our close examination of conversational texts to develop more "authentic" sounding dialogue; a student interested in the media might analyze how political identities are constructed through language. For instance, the mere juxtaposition of references to Iraq and al Qaeda allows an inference of similarity or sameness. Another possibility is the analysis of institutional discourses such as workplace or classroom discourses. Obviously, there are many possible uses and types of analyses, many of which have far-reaching implications.

      Tentative reading list:

      • Blommaert, Jan. (2008). Grassroots Literacy. London: Routledge. (Ch. 1-3)
      • Bucholtz, Mary. (2007). Variation in Transcription. Discourse Studies 9 (6): 784-808.
      • Bucholtz, Mary and Hall, Kira. (2005). Identity and Interaction: A Sociocultural Linguistic Approach, Discourse Studies 7 (4-5): 585-614.
      • Drew, Paul. (2006). When Documents 'Speak': Documents, Language, and Interaction. In Paul Drew, Geoffrey Raymond, and Darin Weinberg (Eds.) Talk and Interaction in Social Research Methods (pp. 63-80). London: Sage.
      • Fairclough, Norman. (1995). Critical Discourse Analysis: The Critical Study of Language. London: Longman. (Chapter 6: Critical Discourse Analysis and the Marketization of Public Discourse: The Universities)
      • Heritage, John. (Forthcoming). Conversation Analysis: Practices and Methods. In David Silverman (Ed.) Qualitative Sociology: Theory, Method, and Practice (3rd Edition). London: Sage.
      • Ivanic, Roz. (1998). Writing and Identity: The Discoursal Construction of Identity in Academic Writing. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (Selected chapters)
      • Jaworski, Adam & Coupland, Nikolas. (1999). Introduction: Perspectives on Discourse Analysis. In Adam Jaworski and Nikolas Coupland (Eds.) The Discourse Reader (pp. 1-44). London: Routledge.
      • Machin, David & van Leeuwen, Theo. (2007). Global Media Discourse: A Critical Introduction. London: Routledge. (Chapters 6-8)
      • Potter, Jonathan & Wetherell, Margaret. (1987). Discourse and Social Psychology: Beyond Attitudes and Behavior. London: Sage. (Selected chapters)
      • ten Have, Paul. (1999) Doing Conversation Analysis. London: Sage Publications.
      • van Leeuwen, Theo. (2008). Discourse and Practice: New Tools for Critical Discourse Analysis. Oxford University Press. (Selected chapters)
      • Wooffitt, Robin. (2005). Conversation Analysis and Discourse Analysis: A Comparative and Critical Introduction. London: Sage.


      English 820: Seminar in Advanced Topics in Literary Criticism and Research sec 001 G
      Professor Richard Grusin
      F 2:00-3:15 pm

      This seminar is designed to provide English and other humanities graduate students with in-depth, first-hand exposure to established and emerging scholars in the humanities, arts, and social sciences through reading, attendance, and participation in Center for 21st Century Studies events. Students will be expected to attend all Center lectures and symposia, usually held on Friday afternoons. On weeks without Center events the seminar will meet to discuss readings related to upcoming lectures and symposia. Students will be expected to keep a blog to post their responses to readings and to public events.


      English 843: Seminar in Renaissance Prose and Poetry sec 001 G
      Subtitle: Reading Political Theory
      Professor Mark Netzloff
      TR 12:30-1:45 pm

      This seminar examines the ways that contemporary theory and criticism draw on the legacies of political thought of the early modern period.

      Our readings will traverse conventional distinctions of period and discipline, with texts from the early modern period (Bodin, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Spinoza), the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (Hegel, Kant, Locke, Marx, Rousseau, Weber), the early twentieth- (Arendt, Benjamin, Gramsci, Schmitt), and late twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on critical work from the past decade (Agamben, Badiou, Balibar, Benhabib, Derrida, Foucault, Habermas, Latour, Negri, Poulantzas, and Rancière, among others).

      Although our readings range widely in terms of historical and cultural contexts, rather than aiming for historical coverage we will, instead, selectively place theorists from different eras in dialogue with one another. Sessions will be devoted to analyzing competing definitions of key concepts -- such as nation, sovereignty, civil society, citizenship, rights, and the public sphere. In addition, we will focus on divergent responses to a series of questions or problems: among others, political theology and the role of religion; political violence; friendship, enmity, and "community"; political affect and the emotions; and thinking beyond the nation and state, whether in terms of supranational, cosmopolitical arrangements or other forms of association (groups, networks, corporations). In other cases we will trace more direct relations of "reading" and revision, including the appropriation of Machiavelli by later Italian political theorists (Gramsci, Negri) and the influence of absolutist political models (Bodin, Hobbes) on a critical tradition running from Schmitt to Agamben.

      Course work will consist of weekly, informal email responses to the class listserv, a presentation (leading of discussion for one class session) and a final 20-page research project.

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      Summer 2010

      English 404: Language, Power and Identity sec 051 U/G
      Professor Patricia Mayes
      6/28-7/24
      MTWR 1:00-3:30 pm

      This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.

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      Spring 2010

      English 436: Writing for Information Society sec 001 (online) U/G
      Professor Dave Clark

      This course explores theories, practices, and tools used by professional documentation specialists. Our topics will include knowledge management, information architecture, information design, and of course instructional writing. While designing and producing individual and group projects, students will have the opportunity to gain both theoretical and practical experience with designing and writing tools, processes, and languages. Projects will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis and usability testing, and collaboration. This course does not assume any prior technical expertise, and students from all plans and majors are welcome.


      English 442: Writing Center Tutoring Practicum sec 001 U/G
      Margaret Mika

      This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.

      In many ways, learning to tutor well is a baptism-by-fire enterprise requiring hours of on-the-job practice. This course provides Writing Center tutors with a foundation of concentrated study and supervised practice from which to begin. Therefore, the first two-thirds of class will be frontloaded, i.e., conducted before the semester starts and 3 weeks before the Writing Center opens. We will meet for 10 hours over two days during the week prior to the first day of classes and again for 1.5 hrs, one Friday each month to complete the course requirements. As important as these formal classes will be the many day to day opportunities for tutors to talk with the director, the graduate assistant coordinator and fellow tutors once the Center opens.

      Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required to enroll. Students must have attained junior status, successfully completed the Writing Center application process and hired as a prospective Writing Center tutor. All majors, especially non-English, are welcome.


      English 443: Grant Writing sec 001 U/G
      Sally Stanton
      T 5:30-8:10 pm

      Do you want to help nonprofit organizations serve the public? Grant writing combines richly descriptive storytelling and subtle persuasion within technical limits established by potential charitable funders of these organizations. The practical skill of preparing clear, concise grant proposals is valued and desired by employers in higher education, engineering, science and medicine, human services, the arts, and cultural institutions.

      In this class, students will learn the basics of researching and writing effective, persuasive grants, and will then develop and apply that knowledge in a writing internship with a community-based nonprofit organization. They will learn how to find and research the sources of charitable funding information available to Milwaukee area organizations and how to effectively organize and present that information for writing grants. Representatives of charitable foundations, professional grant writers, and others will share their knowledge of the nonprofit-funding world and successful grant writing. Students will leave this course with marketable skills and a greater knowledge of the ways in which effective communication adds value to the workplace.


      English 444: Technical Editing sec 001 (online) U/G
      Professor Rachel Spilka

      This course is a hands-on practicum in which students are responsible for both individual and collaborative editing projects. Students learn that in work contexts, the scope of editing tasks can vary dramatically: In some cases, editors "fix up" minor grammatical and usage errors (copyediting); in other cases, editors question, "re-envision," and then reshape major aspects of a document such as its purposes, target audiences, content, style, organization, and design (comprehensive editing). The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to handle both copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks -- and to edit both hard copy and electronic documents -- in future work contexts. A secondary emphasis is on helping students better understand the roles and responsibilities of editors, the ethical dimensions of editing, how editors contribute to document effectiveness, how editors relate to writers during a document's life cycle, and what is involved in becoming a successful editor.

      Weekly course assignments are likely to include discussion forum posts on ethical issues and the editor-writer relationship, in addition to "mini assignments" aimed at developing skills and practice in copyediting; relearning (or learning for the first time) the fundamentals of English grammar, spelling, mechanics and usage; and gaining competence in proofreading and editing technical material. Major editing assignments are likely to include copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks on actual work documents in a variety of content areas (such as public policy, science, and health/medicine). A final collaborative course project will involve working in a team to conduct a comprehensive edit on an actual organization's document, website, or set of documents.


      English 449: Internship in English sec 001, 002, 003, 004 (depending on credits taken) U/G
      Carolyn Washburne
      M 4:30-7:10 pm (initial meeting only; course does not meet regularly)

      This flexible-credit internship for English majors (and selected non-majors) provides students with the opportunity to:

      • Apply their coursework and writing skills while working in a "real world" setting
      • Develop professional skills and experience that are valuable in the marketplace
      • Synthesize course and work experience through progress reports, class discussion, conferences with the instructor, and a final paper

      Internship placements have been arranged with a variety of Milwaukee-area organizations and businesses in the following fields: publishing, public relations/advertising/corporate communications not-for-profit agencies, and technical writing firms/departments (see the URL below for more information on placements). As a writing intern, a student may be called upon to do a variety of tasks, including writing, editing, proofreading, and research.

      To enroll in this course, students must fill out an application form, which is available at www.uwm.edu/Dept/English/bustech/internship/ . The application asks for a summary of their school and work experience, references, and a sample of their writing. A faculty committee will screen applicants for their competency in English grammar, punctuation, and usage, as well as for their ability to conduct themselves appropriately in the workplace.


      English 504: Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Sex and Enlightenment
      Professor Barrett Kalter
      TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm

      The Enlightenment is commonly understood as a philosophical movement that affirms society's progressive discovery of universal moral principles and nature's laws through the public use of critical reason. Sexuality, by contrast, is often seen as a private facet of identity that emanates in unruly ways from the body and its passions. This course will explore the relation between these contradictory categories as represented in eighteenth-century literature, considering: 1) modern notions of sexuality as products of Enlightenment thought; 2) the challenges sex poses to Enlightenment values of self-control, equality, free expression, normalcy, and consent.

      Our discussion will center on the following: the bawdy poetry of the Earl of Rochester and The Libertine, a film of his life starring Johnny Depp; Eliza Haywood's Love in Excess, an early bestseller rivaled in popularity only by Robinson Crusoe; John Cleland's pornographic Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure; and Matthew Lewis's The Monk, a Gothic tale of religious prohibition, transgressive desire, and revolution. We will also read selections from works by Enlightenment intellectuals, including the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and the Marquis de Sade, as well as recent theorists, such as Michel Foucault and Laura Kipnis.

      Topics to be discussed include: libertinism as instance of and resistance to political tyranny; romantic love, intimacy, and private life; pornography, censorship, and freedom of expression; prostitution, urban sexual subcultures (e.g., the proto-homosexual mollies), and the legal and medical definition of deviance.


      English 616: Advanced Workshop in Poetry sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Structures and Constraints
      Professor Brenda Cárdenas
      W 12:00-2:40 pm

      In this workshop, we will explore the effects that various constraints, such as meter, refrain, sound patterns, and self-imposed limits and obstructions have on our poems and our writing processes. We will pay particular attention to how such structures and procedures might serve to make our poems more imaginative, musical, economical, and nuanced. To this end, we will write in formal verse (sonnets, villanelles, pantoums, Sapphic stanzas, and the like), as well as experiment with restrictions in such forms as lipograms, syllabics, palindromes, acrostics, and anagrams, as well as those of our own invention. To accomplish this, we will read and listen to a variety of published texts, complete in-class writing exercises, draft and revise poems outside of class, and bring poems to class to be discussed and critiqued by our classmates.


      English 624: Seminar in Modern Literature U/G
      Subtitle: Dangerous Fictions
      Professor Jason Puskar

      This research seminar studies modern American fiction's interest in risk and danger, often in novels thought to be dangerous themselves. From violent crime to modern warfare, industrial accidents to infectious disease, American novels have a history of seeking out danger, and many of the books that did so were condemned and sometimes banned.

      We will study works by Richard Wright, Nella Larsen, James Cain, and Don DeLillo, as well as Orson Welles's original 1938 radio broadcast of "The War of the Worlds." We will pay special attention to the cultural history of certain kinds of dangers, including crime, natural disasters, and riots. We also will read these novels in relation to recent theories of risk and danger from a variety of disciplines, ranging from anthropology to philosophy.

      Some questions to be asked: Is fiction more or less dangerous because it is "not true"? How does American culture construct risks and dangers through language? How can we understand the relationship of literature to modern institutions of risk analysis and risk management? This course requires students to complete a guided research project.


      English 625: Seminar in Literary History U/G
      Subtitle: Carribean Literary History
      Professor Kevin Browne


      English 628: Seminar in Literature by Women U/G
      Subtitle: Captivity, Seduction and Domesticity
      Professor Kristie Hamilton


      English 629: Seminar in Literature and Sexuality sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Contemporary LGBT Literature
      Professor Barrett Kalter
      TR 3:30-4:45 pm

      In recent years, authors have tried to fill gaps in the historical record by imagining the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people in periods when such lives were routinely kept secret, ignored, and destroyed. Critics of this act of imaginative reclamation question the relevance of modern identities to earlier periods, and wonder if a past isn't being so much restored as created anew, as fiction with no counterpart in fact. In this course, we will read some of the most gorgeously written, thematically ambitious, and sexy works of literature to address these issues, works that satisfy the desire for a queer past while troubling the assumptions about authenticity and knowability that stir that desire.

      Readings may include: C.P. Cavafy, Collected Poems, in Daniel Mendelsohn's acclaimed new translation; Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex; Colm Toibin, The Master; Sarah Waters, Affinity; Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry.


      English 633: Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing sec 001 U/G
      Subtitle: Rhetoric and Everyday Life
      Professor Alice Gillam
      MW 12:30-1:45 pm

      This course introduces students to rhetorical theory and its many everyday practices, including its use in civil discourse, popular culture, and community life. Defined as the ways in which signs influence people, rhetoric permeates every aspect of our daily lives; thus, its study not only offers a framework for critically interpreting the many discourses that we encounter daily but also strategies for participating and intervening in those discourses.

      We will begin our study with an overview of rhetoric theory and then turn to texts that focus on particular practices such as Barry Brummett's Rhetoric in Popular Culture, Ralph Cintron's Angel's Town: Chero Ways, Gang Life, and Rhetorics of the Everyday, and Sharon Crowley's Toward a Civil Discourse. In addition to our readings, students will analyze the rhetoric of various kinds of "everyday" texts as well as compose their own rhetorical performances.


      English 708: Advanced Professional Writing sec 001 (online) G
      Professor Gerald Alred

      Advanced Professional Writing is a course for those interested in developing skill in advanced academic writing or functioning as professional writers in organizations. The course will examine the theory and practice of professional writing in education, business, and government. Students will analyze the rhetoric of professional documents and will receive intensive practice in producing documents of professional quality. The course goals include the following:

      • Develop the skills and ethos of a professional technical writer.
      • Develop a professional writing process both to produce high-quality documents and to diagnose problems in documents.
      • Learn how to conceptualize, develop, and manage large, complex, and challenging writing tasks, such as proposals, professional articles, and major academic projects.
      • Determine how to choose the most appropriate medium or combination of media to accomplish the goals of documentation.
      • Learn audience analysis and develop a "sense of audience."
      • Polish a piece of writing through multiple revisions to a professional level and learn how to work with reviewers.
      • Learn the rhetorical strategies of document organization: be able to sift, evaluate (determine what's relevant and what's not), and integrate information from multiple sources to accomplish a document's purpose and to meet the readers' needs.
      • Although this course is rewarding, it is also demanding: students should be prepared to spend considerable time on research, organization, writing, and revising. For a first-hand account of this course, use the following link to download an article written by a former student: http://www.uwm.edu/~alred/pdf/Schoenecker.pdf.


        English 711: Information Design sec 001 G
        Professor Dave Clark
        M 5:30-8:10 pm

        This course explores the underpinnings, theories, and applications of information design. We will read key works by influential information designers (Tufte, Norman, Nielsen, Jacobson), related theory (Latour, Engestrom, Nardi), and scholarship from rhetoric and professional communication. We will critique texts, design approaches, and interfaces, and get hands-on practice with the design, implementation and testing of design projects for external clients (no prior experience expected or required).


        English 715: Narrative Craft and Theory sec 001 G
        Professor Liam Callanan
        M 4:30-7:10 pm

        This course is a hybrid in the sense that it's part literary analysis and part workshop, focusing on prose. Required for graduate students in creative writing but open to others, it's designed to be taken before the advanced prose workshop, English 815. This semester, we take creative nonfiction as our theme.

        "Creative Nonfiction" has come to mean many different things, both in and out of workshop classrooms. Of late, it's come to mean, specifically, personal essays (and even more specifically, memoir). This course, however, will range farther afield, asking students to read, and later write, literary journalism, long-form feature journalism, scholarly work, memoir, as well as the personal essay.


        English 743: Film Studies sec 001 G
        Subtitle: Introduction to Film Theory and Criticism
        Professor Tami Williams
        M 4:00-8:00 pm

        This course is designed specifically for graduate students interested in expanding their understanding of film and media studies. It provides an in-depth introduction to the history of the field (including the history of film theory and debates about film and the other arts, film and reality, and film and the spectator/audience), and considers multiple approaches to film analysis. It also explores recent innovations in the field, exploring the increasingly complex and convergent relationships among film, television, the internet, and other areas of popular culture in an era of globalization.


        English 753: Contemporary Rhetorical Theory sec 001 (online) G
        Professor Anne Wysocki

        We will focus on digital and networked rhetorics and their relations to (and breaks from) traditional rhetorics -- and, coming from this, how composition pedagogy might be shaped in light of these newer rhetorics.

        In addition to the sorts of questions implied by the above paragraph, we will also consider questions like the following:

        • How are our conceptions of rhetoric shaped by the communication technologies we use?
        • How are our conceptions of rhetoric shaped by the kinds of composing available to us? By the kinds of texts we can compose and the publishing options open to us?
        • How do digital and network rhetorics shape our sense of the possible relations we, as composers, can establish with readers?
        • How do digital and network rhetorics shape our sense of the possible relations we, as textual consumers, establish with a text's composer(s)?
        • What general shifts can we notice in how we read in print to how we read online?
        • When we compose digitally, for network consumption, what are our ethical obligations to our students, our other audiences, ourselves, and our own texts?
        • Because it makes sense to explore the possibilities of digital rhetorics through production and use rather than from the distance of print only, this will be an online class in which we will explore the sorts of writing/composing that the currently configured digital rhetorics make possible.


          English 754: Autobiography as Pedagogy for Teachers of Writing G
          Professor Mary Louise Buley-Meissner
          T 4:30-7:10 pm

          This course is open to graduate students who are seriously interested in the teaching of writing, particularly in becoming more self-reflective and critically aware of how their work in the classroom is inevitably influenced by their experiences beyond it. The main project for this course will be a personal narrative integrating autobiographical reflection with professional concerns directly relevant to the teaching of writing. This narrative is to be centered in individual experience and informed by research. Guidance for an appropriate approach to take will be provided by course reading, class discussion of work in progress, and instructor consultation.

          You are likely to enjoy this seminar if you enjoy reading, writing, and collaborative learning as opportunities to reconsider what you believe and re-envision what might be true (about teachers, students, literacy, the purposes of higher education). Everyone is expected to share responsibility for the seminar itself as a "work in progress" (with the participants' questions and concerns influencing the direction we take together). Given the diverse backgrounds of people in our graduate program, I look forward to a lively exchange of ideas. Whatever your individual interests may be, I hope that together we can experience the extraordinary power of the written word in shaping who we are, what we believe, and why we reach for truth beyond the telling.

          Texts (a tentative list):

          • Behar, Ruth. The Vulnerable Observer: Anthropology That Breaks Your Heart. Boston: Beacon, 1997.
          • Dews, C.L. Barney, and Carolyn Leste Laws, eds. This Fine Place So Far from Home: Voices of Academics from the Working Class. Philadelphia: Temple UP, 1995.
          • hooks, bell. Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope. New York: Routledge, 2003.
          • Martin, Rachel. Listening Up: Reinventing Ourselves as Teachers and Students. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann/Boynton/Cook, 2001.
          • Ogulnick, Karen, ed. Language Crossings: Negotiating the Self in a Multicultural World. New York: Teachers College P, 2001.
          • Perl, Sondra. On Austrian Soil: Teaching Those I Was Taught to Hate. New York: State U of NY P, 2005.
          • Schmidt, Jan Zlotnik, ed. Women/Writing/Teaching. New York: State U of NY P, 1998.
          • Singley, Bernestine, ed. When Race Becomes Real: Black and White Writers Confront Their Personal Histories. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2008.
          • Perl, Sondra. On Austrian Soil: Teaching Those I Was Taught to Hate. New York: State U of NY P, 2005.

          • English 777: American Literature to 1830 G
            Subtitle: Survey of Literature and Critical History
            Professor Kristie Hamilton


            English 824: Seminar in Special Topics in Literature G
            Subtitle: Modernism, Urbanism, and the Novel
            Professor Andrew Kincaid
            W 2:00-4:40 pm

            For the great theorists of modernity--Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, and Karl Marx--understanding the city was the key to understanding modern life. The urban was the site where the individual and the state were most prominently displayed, and where they most openly clashed. From Engels' "The Great Towns" through Benjamin's memoirs of Berlin and Moscow, to more recent efforts by Frederic Jameson and Saskia Sassen to understand the processes of globalization, theorists have read the built environment as a metaphor for the shifting tensions among the great themes of modernity: identity, history, memory, tradition, nation and class. Likewise, modernity's and postmodernity's writers--Joyce, Dickens, Poe, Baudelaire, Pynchon--look to innovative styles and linguistic invention in order to allow the new rhythms of urban life to be captured on the page.

            These critical and literary reflections were both the result of and an engagement with a whole host of changes occurring to the urban landscape: industrialization, overcrowding, the rise of the tenement, suburbanization, as well as new forms of state planning and modern architecture. As a response to the excesses of laissez faire capitalism, all sorts of competing forces--the state, industrialists, reformers and socialists--engaged in efforts to regulate, control and improve the urban environment and the lives of its inhabitants. Planned industrial communities in the United States, Britain and Germany were founded to enhance efficiency and avoid the worst problems of labor militancy. In Britain, garden cities were created to disperse dense urban centers. Colonies were the sites of new modern capitals, ceremonial and majestic, built to impress the local population with the strength of the imperial power. In America, zoning and suburbanization ensured the growth of capitalist cities, while in the former Soviet Union, centrally planned cities would, it was hoped, create successful socialist cities. In each of these cases, the question posed was a similar one: how can the production of the built urban environment further the legitimation and implementation of ideology?

            Urbanism and literary modernism, therefore, share a common set of concerns: how might the city best be represented; what kinds of social practices ought the city to encourage and to prohibit; and how are the aesthetics and politics of urban form connected?

            In this course, we will bring the discourses of literary modernism and urban planning and architecture into conversation with each other. The first goal is to examine how the changing face of modern cities (Manchester, London, Paris, Dublin, New Delhi, L.A.) influenced the culture and theory of modernity. The second goal is to trace the ways in which architects and planners responded to the problems of modernization. We will read works by influential urban planners and architects who have engaged the ideas of modernity with the building of cities: Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ebenezer Howard, Rem Koolhaas and others.

            Finally, we will read a selection of novels that reflects on modern urban life: Charles Dickens, Edward Bellamy, Italo Calvino, Margaret Atwood, Ayn Rand, and others.


            English 825: Seminar in Major Figures G
            Subtitle: James Joyce
            Professor José Lanters
            T 3:30-6:10 pm

            James Joyce (1882-1941), one of the major representatives of literary Modernism, claimed that his works would keep the critics busy for a hundred years. Indeed, since the 1960s, what has come to be known as the 'Joyce industry' has generated a wealth of critical and theoretical readings of Joyce's oeuvre that reveal the multi-faceted nature of his accomplishment. In this course, we will focus on Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses, and explore the nature and history of critical responses to those works.


            English 871: Seminar in African American Literature G
            Subtitle: Black Literature and Film: Africa and the African Diaspora
            Professor Sandra Grayson


            English 876: Seminar in Mass Culture G
            Subtitle: Narratives Across Media: Film, Television and the Ludic turn
            Professor Tasha Oren
            W 4-6:50 pm

            The course examines contemporary storytelling as it encounters emerging media technologies and changes in viewing environments, notions of authorship, and popular practices. The course takes up theories, examples (screenings), and critical analysis of popular narratives and styles through 3 basic themes, following three major developments and debates in the field: Narrative Complexity (genre, seriality, multiplying narrative threads and transmedia), Interactivity, and Play.

            We'll begin by looking at theories, developments, and narrative trends in contemporary film and television, then expand our readings to other forms and questions as we trace how media convergence, globalization, and promise and practice of interactivity have influenced current thinking and theorizing about narrative and the future of media texts. We'll then take a look at alternative models and the emergence of play (the ludic) and game studies in contemporary critical engagements and debates within and beyond media studies.


            English 878: Seminar in Feminist Critical Theory G
            Subtitle: Cultural Diversity, Multiculturalism, Globalization: Gendered Debates
            Professor Kumkum Sangari
            W 1:00-3:40 pm

            Is cultural diversity synonymous with multiculturalism? What produces cultural diversity?

            This course works towards a critique of multiculturalism based on exclusivist, primordial and normative notions of culture, religion and race. It will explore the feminist debate on multiculturalism, try to disentangle market-centred notions of multiculturalism, and work towards a different understanding of diversity in both national and transnational arenas. It will focus on modes of exclusion and containment as well as on social and economic processes of diversification through a discussion of caste, class, religion, race, labour, market, migration, nation, state and patriarchies. The course sets out to explore and understand the social processes that have produced as well as suppressed diversity within old colonial and new global regimes.


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            Spring 2010 – other

            Art History 761: Graduate Colloquium G
            Subtitle: The Carnal Screen: Sexuality, Gender & Embodiment in the Cinema
            Elena Gorfinkel, Art History
            R 3:00-6:00 pm

            Why does screen sex compel our fascination as well as elicit dissatisfaction, censure and even disgust? This graduate level colloquium provides an introduction to the history, theory and criticism of sexuality in the cinema, exploring the conditions through which sex, gender and corporeal experience have been made visible andpalpable via the moving image.

            We will survey the variant methodologies of film history, legal history, feminist film and queer theories, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, political theory and sociology which have made sense of the appearance, mediation, and transformation of screen sex. The course will contend with the fundamental difficulties (ontological, legal, economic) the cinema hashad in "speaking" and envisioning the sex act and the carnal appetites, from Edison's kinetoscopes to our contemporary hypersexualized digital present.

            We will read works by Michel Foucault, Thomas Laquer, Linda Williams, Eric Schaefer, Jon Lewis, Lauren Berlant, Michael Warner, Jeffrey Escoffier, Tom Waugh, Parker Tyler, Janet Staiger, William Ian Miller, Laura Marks, among others. Some outside screenings will be required.


            Liberal Studies 722: Special Topics in Contemporary Cultural Studies G
            Subtitle: Dwelling in Place and Time
            Jennifer Johung, Art History
            W 6:00-8:40 pm

            What does it mean to dwell? What are the structures, modes, and systems of modern and contemporary dwelling, and what do they say about our current spatial situations? Through a broad interdisciplinary framework that engages with architecture, art history, performance, phenomenological philosophy and network theory, from the modern to contemporary period, this class will examine key debates surrounding the construction of place, in relation to the rise of modern Western nomadism and globalization.

            In looking at both the structures and systems of spatial situation, the class will explore dwelling as both a material form and a temporal process. Attending to both the objects and processes of dwelling, we will turn to performance theory in order to explore the critical and material potential embedded in a concept of dwelling as event. In dialogue with visual and environmental art practices beginning in the late 1950s, performance emphasizes the embodied practices and paths of dwellers as participants in the ongoing formation of built structures. We will consider how this understanding of dwelling, as a participatory event rather than a stable construction, may intervene into existing experiences of spatial and phenomenal belonging. In fact, the philosopher Karsten Harries has more recently argued for an understanding of dwelling as an ongoing and variable journey towards home. With this in mind, the class will think about how questions of dwelling are not only architectural or structural problems, but rather are ethical issues that involve the connections between human beings and their place in the world over time.


            Arch 790: Practicum in Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures G
            Arijit Sen, Architecture
            F 9:00-11:50 am

            Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures is an interdisciplinary research area concentrating on the examination of the physical, cultural, and social aspects of the built environment. The program serves students enrolled in the architecture and history of art doctoral programs at the UW Milwaukee and Madison campuses respectively.

            Course Description and Pedagogical Objectives:
            This course is about reading the quotidian built environment (that includes ordinary buildings, landscapes, material objects, and urban places) as cultural artifact. By focusing on the material world this course expands our methods of historical inquiry beyond the analysis of written records, texts, biographies, art, photography and folklore. Primarily borrowing from material culture studies this course also adapts methods and theories used in sub-fields such as environmental history, urban/architectural history, landscape history and public history. Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures scholars train to do interdisciplinary humanities research.

            Field application and field work is central to the way we learn. Theories and methods used in the field will be applied during analysis of real buildings, landscapes and cultures. (That is why this course is called a practicum). In this class students will use a method of field analysis that begins with a cross-section of a city as a site of inquiry (that method has been used by geographers such as Grady Clay and architectural scholars such as Patrick Geddes). We will study an urban cross section across Milwaukee River (North Water Street between Kane and Brady). Students will have a choice of studying the entire cross section (a number of city blocks and topographical features), a part of the cross section (a single building, a cluster of buildings etc.) or a point in the cross section in order to apply theories and methods discussed in class (see weekly schedule below for specific issues discussed in class). Therefore scales of analysis vary from the near environment to the architectural, urban, regional, and transnational--producing very different results. Class work includes travel in/around Madison and Milwaukee.

            In addition, this course has built-in workshops that introduce students to the field by discussing venues for presenting their work, applying for jobs, and analyzing related documents and strategies. Building on the foundations presented in this class, students are encouraged to pursue their specific interests in art history, architecture and planning, landscape architecture, geography, anthropology, folklore, social and economic relations, and urban history in subsequent semesters.


            Communication 973: Rhetoric, Pragmatism and Intellectual History G
            William Keith, Communication
            M 6:30-9:10 pm

            Some of the most exciting connections between philosophy and rhetoric in the last 30 years have arisen from the combination of (neo-) pragmatism and rhetorical theory. This course will begin by introducing students to the historical background and writings of the American pragmatists. We will engage the literature on rhetoric and pragmatism, focusing on an historicized version of theory, and the methods for arguing within that context.

            Questions of the course will include the relationship of rhetoric and democracy, rhetoric in public life, the relationship of pragmatism to art and aesthetics, and pragmatism as philosophy of communication. Students will be encouraged to pursue their own projects as related to the themes of the course.

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