2012 Student Work Magazine

Undergraduate students


All work is © the student unless otherwise indicated.


2012 Virginia Burke Contest award winners

The Virginia Burke Writing Contest honors outstanding achievement of UWM's first-year writing students whose essays are judged the best of the year. It is named in honor of the late Professor Virginia Burke, an outstanding professor of English composition and language, who possessed a national reputation and was extremely devoted to undergraduate writing instruction at UWM for over thirty years.

Lewis's Insight on Determining What's Right

Marlina Jones

This 2012 Virginia Burke Award-winning essay is an interpretive essay for English 095, taught by Joan Ruffino. About her essay, Marlina writes: "when looking at the text that was given to me it was a well put together idea I simply just explanded on it. The key to my success was that unlike most people who think outside the box but I don't. I feel there is no box, which means that there are no limitations to what I can think or write about. I hope that my readers truly understand how our meaning of things are determined."

David Foster Wallace — "Consider the Lobster"

Mauly Her

This 2012 Virginia Burke Award-winning essay is an interpretive essay for English 101, taught by Amy Shields.

Hero to Antihero

Joshua Zaharias

This 2012 Virginia Burke Award-winning essay is a research project for English 102, taught by Adam Andrews.

Rethinking Literacy: The Keys to Better Understanding Through Ethnography

Ethan Reik

This 2012 Virginia Burke Award-winning essay is a critical literacy biography for English 201, taught by Daniel Listoe.

Spring 2012 Student Work Magazine

The works included here were nominated by faculty and instructors for outstanding student work from spring 2011, fall 2011, and spring 2012.

Maternal Instinct

Christopher Elst

This short story was written for Carol Ross' English 430: Advanced Writing Workshop.

Literacy Museums

By various student writers in Peter Brooks' English 101 (spring 2012) course

Inspired by Anthony Esposito's "The Culture of Steel and Memory" from Who Says? Working-Class Rhetoric, Class Consciousness, and Community, this semester students in English 101 Section 008 have been working on creating literacy museums containing reading and writing artifacts. After working on a series of six daily writing prompts, students culled together their four most influential experiences including a Supportive Reading/Writing Assignment, a Challenging Reading/Writing assignment, a Personal Artifact, and an ongoing inspiration which helps motivate the student through college. The culminating project was a visual museum containing both pictures and texts of the four most influential experiences. (Intro by Peter Brooks)

A New Battleground

Keegan Mager

This digital story was made for Melissa Schoeffel's English 277: Introduction to Ethnic Minority Literature: Multicultural Motherhood.

Storytelling

Samantha Robinson

This poetry generator was made for Stuart Moulthrop's Eng 417: Readings for Writers.

Selected Pieces by Justin Ramm

My work explores the blurred intersection of visual and textual spaces. It is motivated by an interest in etymology and genealogy, in linguistics, and in a kind of tactile archaeology or excavation of words from diverse contexts. I like to think of all language as collagistic, a fact that defines much of the way that I think and create. I'm confident that the increasingly inventive diegetic spaces of literature have and will continue to provide pivotal new lenses through which we can re-envision our culture and history.

Adam

Emily Ramsey

This essay was written for Susan Kearns' Film Studies 212: Intermediate Topics in Film Studies: Sideshows in Popular Culture.

How She Looks

Arpad Ivanyos

I wrote this personal memoir for an English 430 workshop assignment. It began as part of an autobiographical writing exercise, scribbled within fifteen minutes, or so, and germinated from there. It is an unexpected, personal reflection about events from my past that I had completely forgotten and was glad to relive.

My Joy

Ashley Johnson

This digital story was made for Melissa Schoeffel's English 277: Introduction to Ethnic Minority Literature: Multicultural Motherhood.