Undergraduate Classes


Summer 2013

111 Introduction to Film, TV, and the Internet sec: 211
Subtitle:
Gilberto M. Blasini
1st 4-week session (May 28 - June 22)

Entertainment Arts 111 offers a general introduction to the critical study of film, television, and new media. While examining each technology individually we will also work in a state of persistent comparison, endeavoring to comprehend media culture as a larger phenomenon. There are no prerequisites for this course and you are therefore not expected to have any prior knowledge of media studies. We will begin with the premise that film, television, and new media offer much more than �entertainment� and, accordingly, studying these forms is a serious undertaking requiring rigor and diligence. There are no textbooks or readers to be purchased for this course. All required readings are available in PDF format at our course�s D2L site. As part of your work for this class, you will write three short papers, one for each of the course�s units�that is, one on TV, one on film and one on new media. These papers will assess how well you can apply the theories, and methods presented to you through lecture notes, readings and screenings. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement in the Humanities. English 111 is a core course for the Digital Arts and Culture Certificate Program.

More info: gblasini@uwm.edu and http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/filmstudies/ http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/filmstudies/

290 Introduction to Film Studies
Tasha oren
online

"Learn about the basics of film style, criticism, story structure and what makes movies work. This course introduces students to the basics of film analysis, formal elements, genre, and narrative structure and helps develop skills to recognize, analyze, describe and enjoy film as an art and entertainment form. The class includes readings, screenings, writing assignments and online discussion. Class, screenings, lectures and readings are all online: no textbook purchase is required. Open to all students; satisfies the GER Humanities requirement and a DAC certificate course"

More info: tgoren@uwm.edu

312 Topics in Film Studies
Subtitle: Cinema and Digital Culture
Tami Williams
online

"From cinema to cell phones, the multimedia context of contemporary life is rapidly changing. From the late 19th century kinetoscope to the 21st century iPhone, moving image culture has, in fact, never stopped reinventing or creating itself anew. This course provides a general introduction to the critical study of motion pictures in relation to digital media. We will examine the nature of the digital from a variety of perspectives: technological, economic and social. However, our primary approach will be cultural and aesthetic. Namely, we will look at how ""new media,"" such as digital photography, video games, virtual reality, and the �World Wide Web,� refashion earlier forms such as film and television, as well as how these latter are, themselves, influenced by emerging media. In addition to studying critical, historical and theoretical texts on new technologies, we will consider the place of the Self within the context of new media. Class discussions will focus on readings, film viewings and web visits. This course counts towards the Digital Arts and Culture Certificate Program. (For more info, visit the DAC program website: www.uwm.edu/Dept/dac/)."

More info: tamiw@uwm.edu and http://uwmdac.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/spring-2013-online-offering-englishfilm-studies-312-cinema-and-digital-culture/

449 Writing Internship in English
Rachel Spilka
Meetings will be scheduled at the students' convenience

"This flexible-credit internship is an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to gain �real world� writing or related experience that can supplement their academic credentials and broaden their marketability for postgraduate positions in both academia and industry. Internship placements are available in publishing, public relations/advertising, and non-profit agencies and larger businesses or corporations. When meeting with the instructor prior to the summer term, students will create a short-list of placements that match up well with their career goals and interests. Students might be called upon to complete a variety of tasks in an internship placement, but typically their work involves research, writing, editing, design, proofreading, and other activities related to creating quality documentation. Students can enroll for ENG 449 for 1-4 credits per term and if they wish, they can take the course multiple times (at the same internship placement or different placements) up to a total of 9 credits. Most students prefer to take the course for 3 credits, which means that they will spend an average of 10-15 hours each week on internship work. If you are interested in setting up a summer internship, contact Rachel Spilka at spilka@uwm.edu, if possible before the end of the spring semester. Note that it commonly takes between three or more weeks to move through the process of finding and finalizing a placement."

More info: spilka@uwm.edu

452 Shakespeare sec: 51
Mark Netzloff
M-R, 1:00-3:30 (2nd 4-week summer session)

This course provides an introductory survey of Shakespearean drama. Due to our compressed four-week schedule, we will be focusing on only four plays: The Merchant of Venice, Henry V, Hamlet, and Othello. Complementing our close reading of the plays, we will also be situating the texts in relation to their literary, theatrical, and historical contexts. Because Shakespeare wrote his plays for performance rather than publication, we will pay particular attention to the cultural importance of the early modern theater. In addition, we will examine the ways these texts have been reinterpreted over time by looking at the plays in performance and on film, including screenings of productions of each play.

More info: Netzloff@uwm.edu



Fall 2013

English 192 : Translation Games sec 004
Subtitle: Hidden Meanings in Language
Jennifer Mattson
MW 2:00 - 3:15

Does "I feel trapped" mean the same in male-speak as it does in female-speak? When a girlfriend says, "Are you hungry?" you know it means SHE is hungry. What does it mean when a professor says, "I don't formally take attendance, but..."? Why does an international student misinterpret your friendly suggestion to "help yourself"? We will explore hidden and (mis)understood meanings between males and females, between advertisers and consumers, between politicians and voters, between Caucasians and African-Americans, between internationals who speak English as a second language and native speakers, between mainstream speakers of American English and non-mainstream speakers. We will also examine the language of political correctness, propaganda, text messaging, etc. You will have the opportunity to interact with someone who speaks English as a second language, and will learn to recognize and observe various dialects, genderlects, sociolects, and idiolects. This will in turn make you more aware of the ways you and those around you use language. Your metalinguistic awareness will increase. Students will discuss articles and metalinguistic awareness fieldwork assignments in small groups in class, listen to/watch audio and video clips of dialects and various language issues, take notes on information given in class, take three exams, and meet once a week (10 times) for an hour with an international conversation partner. The grading formula is 20% for each of three exams, 20% for conversation partner participation, and 20% for class participation and posting your language observations."

More info: jennifr@uwm.edu


English 210 : International English sec 001
Subtitle: International English
Laura L. Ambrose
Mon&Wed 2:00-3:15

"As English has made�and continues to make�its way around the globe, radical changes to local languages and cultures have occurred. At the same time, however, English itself has been modified, adapted, and expanded, sometimes in unfamiliar and unrecognizable ways. This course is a survey of English from its origins in the British Isles to its introduction and development in the Americas, Australia, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Several principal examples will be studied in detail. In doing so, we will also uncover many issues that accompany language globalization; such as, language change, loss of language and identity, language policy and standardization, and teaching and learning English."

More info: lambrose@uwm.edu


English 212 : English Grammar and Usage
Subtitle: English Grammar and Usage
Laura L. Ambrose
Tu&Thu 2:00-3:15; Mon&Wed 4:00-5:15

Precise, powerful, and sophisticated writing starts with well-constructed sentences; this course is an in-depth study of these fundamental building blocks of English. Not only will we develop a vocabulary of basic grammatical terms and concepts for talking about the structure of the language, but we will also explore how this knowledge can be leveraged to create and edit texts more effectively.

More info: lambrose@uwm.edu


Film 212 : Intermediate Topics in Film Studies sec 001
Subtitle: Participatory Culture: Audiences, Viewers, and Fans
Katherine Morrissey
Tuesday/Thursday 2-3:50

From audiences sitting in the dark of the theater, to impassioned fans at conventions, there are many ways to engage with media texts. Popular media inspires our passion, our anger, and sparks public conversations around the role of media in society. This class will explore different theories of audiences, viewers, and fans and look at film, television, and digital media texts through these lenses. Over the course of the semester we will investigate how different media organize reception and the ways that viewers have responded to popular media. The course will ask students to take an active role in the class by reflecting on their own experiences as viewers and producing creative and critical responses to media texts. Students will also investigate historical contexts for different media texts and celebrities, placing their own experiences with media texts in conversation with others.

More info: morriss9@uwm.edu


English 214 : Writing in the Professions sec 001
Subtitle: Writing for Social Media and Careers
Chris Lyons
Online

"The resume isn't dead, but it's not enough! Most people find their jobs through networking, and that�s not new. But networking now means building and maintaining a well-crafted, professional online presence and standing up to the scrutiny of recruiter searches and data mining. This course will go well beyond the standard advice (�don�t post drunk pictures on Facebook�) and help you develop a positive, well-designed online presence that will position you well for the job market of the 21st century. Among other things, you will learn, discuss, and write about the following: * The culture of the job market * Data mining * Social media and traditional networking * Job searching tools and strategies And you will create or vastly enhance the following: * Resumes * Cover letters * Social media presence * Online portfolio Questions? Please contact instructor Chris Lyons (bobdylan@uwm.edu)."

More info: bobdylan@uwm.edu


English 230 : Writing With Style
Jessica Nastal
Tuesdays/Thursdays, 2:00-3:15 pm

"In this workshop-based course, students develop and enhance their expository writing style by: � reading short essay selections � sharing & analyzing their favorite writers � writing in a variety of rhetorical styles � reviewing & discussing each other�s writing"

More info: jlnastal@uwm.edu


English 236 : Introductory Topics in Creative Writing sec 001
Subtitle: Little Writings
Aviva Cristy
Tues & Thurs 9:30-10:45

In this creative writing course we will be working with little writing in small spaces. Our goal will be to see how much we can say in the fewest words possible! Short shorts, flash fiction, 10-minute plays, micro-graphic stories, and tiny poems. We will be reading examples, talking about how to craft our own writing, and making our own little writings.

More info: aecristy@uwm.edu


English 240 : Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture sec 001
Subtitle: Laughing in the face of Logic
Nic Learned
MW 12:30- 1:45

This course will examine the dynamics of humor broadly, ranging from its function in interpersonal relationships to its role on the national stage. We will examine diverse texts and approaches to analyzing humor, and we will apply their methods to a broad range of laughter-inducing events, including students' personal experience with friends & family and other texts of their choosing (films, shows, youtube videos, etc) . Readings, approaches, and the nature of students' work will vary greatly over the semester, ranging from written analysis to taking in a comedian or funny show, and culminating in a creative project of students' own choosing in collaboration with the instructor. Humor is a fascinating phenomenon, both logical and anti-logic, abstract and bodily, and it transforms the stressful, tense, and sometimes dark aspects of our lives into happy little moments that somehow bring us closer to those around us. The course will be about understanding these paradoxical aspects of humor in ways relevant to students' lives.

More info: learned@uwm.edu


English 247 : Literature and Human Experince
Subtitle: Literature and Democratic Society
Chase Erwin
T/Th 12:30pm to 1:45pm

Democracy: ghost or spirit? That is, does the idea of �democracy,� however we choose to define the term, haunt us by reminding us how we fail to live up to its standards? Or does it unite us, inspiring us to work together to continue creating the society that it allows us to imagine? This is the question we will try to answer in �English 247: Literature and Democratic Society.� This class will survey an eclectic selection of literary texts written in many different forms, from short stories to poetry, prose, novels, graphic novels, TV, and film; in geographically and historically diverse contexts, from ancient Greece, to the United States during the Civil War and the Cold War, Nazi Germany, apartheid South Africa; to settings imagined in both utopian and dystopian futures; and will cover a variety of different literary modes ranging from tragedy to farce, young adult literature, speculative literature, parodies, satires, odes and more. Our goal in reading these diverse texts is to discover both how democracy and democratic society has been defined in different cultures and at different times, and to explore the problems and conflicts inherent in the practice of democratic decision making. Ultimately, all of these considerations will come together to help us ask our most pressing question as inheritors of the various democratic traditions we will explore: How and in what ways will the idea of democracy continue to influence our political future?

More info: cmerwin@uwm.edu


English 248 : Literature and Contemporary Life
Subtitle: Queer Theory and the Novel
Shawna Lipton
MoWe 9:30AM - 10:45AM

"Course Description: This course provides an introduction to Queer Theory alongside five novels. We will develop an understanding of gender and sexuality that emphasizes shifting boundaries, and definitions that change depending on historical and cultural context. By thinking through the intersections between literature, gender, and sexuality, we will examine the connections between aesthetics and politics, discourse and society, story, and life. Required Texts: Sigmund Freud, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness James Baldwin Giovanni�s Room Leslie Feinberg, Stone Butch Blues Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body Course Pack Assignments: 3 x 3-page papers (on texts read for class)�1/6 of the grade each. Take-Home Final Exam�1/6 of the grade. Discussion Leader- 1/6 of the grade. Class Participation (attendance, participation)�1/6 of the grade."

More info: selipton@uwm.edu


English 248 : Literature and Contemporary Life sec 002
Subtitle: Information Overload
Rachael Sullivan
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:45pm

Information overload is a contemporary cultural concern with a rich past. This course will cover a broad sampling of texts from different time periods and genres to consider how our current confrontation/struggle with digital technologies both is and is not new. We will pay attention to the various forms that information overload takes: a pathological condition, a burden on attention and social bonds, a renaissance of knowledge access and production, and even a non-issue. Most importantly for our purposes, the texts we read and view will help us ask how our understanding of knowledge, literature, and even ourselves evolves alongside technological innovations. Assignments will include contributing to a class archive of links and resources, short reading responses (blog posts) every two or three weeks, a take-home midterm, and a final paper. The required readings are still under consideration, but most of our readings are available online. We�ll read selections from Walt Whitman, Gertrude Stein, Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, Vannevar Bush, Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman, Cathy Davidson, and Clay Shirky. In addition, we will read a novel like Thomas Pynchon�s The Crying of Lot 49, E.M. Forster�s The Machine Stops (which is more like a novella), or Don DeLillo�s White Noise.

More info: http://courses.rachaelsullivan.com/248/ and sulliv97@uwm.edu


Ethnic Studies 250 : Special topics in Ethnic Studies sec 001
Subtitle: "Performing South Asian Diaspora: Bollywood and Beyond
Suchi Banerjee
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8.00-9.15 a.m.

This course will look at South Asian literature and culture within postcolonial diaspora.

More info: banerje4@uwm.edu


English 263 : Gender, Realism, and the Rise of the British Novel sec 002
Dawn Nawrot
Tuesday / Thursday 3:30-4:45

During the eighteenth century, the novel developed into a popular literary genre for private consumption that was somewhat distinct from earlier romance or allegorical prose. Many early novels experimented in depicting realistic individual experiences in relatable places and social contexts that connected with readers. Both men and women were active participants in the development of the eighteenth-century novel as writers, audiences, narrative voices, and subjects of the texts as well. This helped to expand the voices and experiences depicted within the novel. In addition, the novel historically evolved alongside the rising middle class. It became a popular medium to teach both male and female readers middle-class ideologies about individual subjecthood, gender roles, relationships, and also civil society. British realist novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth century generally demonstrated and encouraged self-awareness and moral growth for the readers as the characters learned life lessons throughout the narrative. In this course, we will question what seems �real� about these narratives. We will also determine and analyze how realism is used within popular texts to depict and construct gender roles for men and women in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In addition, the class will evaluate how didacticism, sentimentalism, etc. also serve to reinforce or distort realism in these novels. Some of the novels include: Defoe�s Moll Flanders, Burney�s Evelina, Wollstonecraft�s Maria, George Elliot�s Silas Marner, and other late nineteenth-century realist authors.

More info: danawrot@uwm.edu


English 263 : Introduction to the Novel sec 001
Subtitle: The Irish Novel
Michael Beebe
Mon/Wed 11a-12:15p

"This course will introduce students to the boisterous, intellectual and comical world of Irish writing through one of its most important forms, the novel. Beginning in 1800 with Maria Edgeworth�s Castle Rackrent, we will journey across the development of the modern Irish novel up to the present day. Works by such literary icons as James Joyce, Flann O�Brien and Samuel Beckett will figure prominently in the syllabus. Discussions will deal with historical, political and aesthetic contexts that contribute to the enduring value of the literature. The study of Irish culture and its most important questions and debates will inform students� reading and writing. Most crucially, we will ask: What can we learn about our world today through the study of Ireland, its people, and its literature? The writing workload of the course will be as follows: four short responses to assigned readings, a mid-term paper of 3-5 pages, and a final paper of 4-6 pages. The mid-term and final papers will be expected to analyze a theme or feature of one assigned novel as a literary and/or cultural object of study."

More info: mebeebe@uwm.edu


English 268 : Introduction to Cultural Studies sec 001
Subtitle: Alternative Comics
Mark Heimermann
T/H 11:00-12:15

We will read comics and graphic novels published outside of the mainstream comics presses, such as Art Spiegelman's Maus and Daniel Clowes' Ghost World. Students will engage in formal and thematic analysis, and I will provide historical contextualization.

More info: heimerm5@uwm.edu


English 269 : Literary Forms and Genres
Subtitle: Speculative Literature
Ching-In Chen (listed as Elizabeth Chen)
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2-3:15pm

Speculative literature is a term describing the broad (and much-argued-over!) field of fantastic literature that often is thought of to include (but not limited to) futurist, utopian/dystopian, historical fiction, hard science fiction, epic fantasy, ghost/horror stories, folk and fairy tales, slipstream, magical realism, modern myth-making and fabulism. Poet Cathy Park Hong has said, �It�s almost impossible for us to perceive the present because it�s all around us. Speculative landscapes give us a binocular perception of the present moment�it�s a strategy of indirection.� In our class, we will discuss Hong's ideas about speculative writing along with others and consider what possibilities are opened up by writings which speculate and conjecture experimentally, futuristically and fantastically. We'll investigate texts by speculators including Octavia Butler (The Parable of the Sower), Cathy Park Hong (Dance Dance Revolution); Larissa Lai (Salt Fish Girl); Sesshu Foster (Atomik Aztex); Salvador Plascencia (The People of Paper), and Bhanu Kapil (The Incubation of Monsters), and selections from Will Alexander, Julio Cortazar, Nalo Hopkinson, Anthony Josef, and others.

More info: ecchen@uwm.edu


English 316 : World Cinema sec 001
Subtitle: Latin American Cinema
Gilberto M. Blasini
Mondays & Wednesdays, 1:00 - 3:30 PM

This course provides a comprehensive survey of different cinematic manifestations in Latin America. Due to the availability of films with English subtitles, the course emphasizes filmic works from the 1960s to the present. Screenings and readings will be divided by countries (e.g., Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico) allowing us to think about the specific role that cinema has played in the formation of different national contexts. Along with this nation-based approach, films will be analyzed in relation to the continental category of �Latin American Cinema.� To that end, the course will also pay close attention to the indigenous theories of cinema that emerged as part of the movement known as �The New Latin American Cinema.� This term refers to a transnational cinematic movement that emerged during the 1960s and that called for the creation of a distinct cinematic language for representing the particular social, cultural, political and national realities and concerns of Latin American countries. Part of our intellectual inquiry when analyzing post-1980s films is to assess if they still follow or not the precepts postulated by the New Latin American Cinema theories. Additionally, questions related to cultural difference, particularly in relation to class, gender and sexuality, will be central to our discussions of the films screened in class. Finally, the course has a longer class meeting time (2 � hours twice a week) in order to accommodate film screenings.

More info: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/filmstudies/ and gblasini@uwm.edu


English 380 : Media and Society sec 002
Subtitle: Game Culture
Stuart Moulthrop
Tuesdays 3-4:50, Thursdays 4 or 5:00

This is an introduction to games (video- and otherwise) as substantial cultural work: games as discourse, games as persuasion, games as art. Lectures, readings, and discussions are supplemented by critical play. Examples span from board and card games to PC, console, and multi-player computer games, and role-playing campaigns.

More info: www.tinyurl.com/gameCult and moulthro@uwm.edu


English 383 : Cinema and Genre sec 001
Subtitle: Horror Cinema, 1960 - 1985
Gilberto M. Blasini
Mondays & Wednesdays, 4:30 - 7:00 PM

The course surveys the gradual transformation of horror films�mostly but not exclusively in the U.S.�from B-movie status to a popularly and critically praised genre during the 25-year period between 1960 and 1985. The release of Alfred Hitchcock�s Psycho and Michael Powell�s Peeping Tom in 1960 marks a transition in terms of thematic, ideological and narrative approaches to conveying horror filmically. The historical changes that took place after 1960 (the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal, the women�s movement, the sexual revolution, the civil rights movement, the end of the Hays Code and the appearance of the MPAA ratings system, among others) further transformed the cinematic configuration of the horror genre, giving many directors the opportunity to create socially relevant and aesthetically challenging texts that were able to engage a wide variety of audiences (e.g., the youth, African Americans). We will study a number of filmmakers who emerged as horror auteurs during these years�Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Brian de Palma, Larry Cohen, Tobe Hooper, and David Cronenberg. In order to understand the social relevance of these films, the course will pay close attention to their relationship to their historical context. Thus, we will examine how these films engage discourses related to gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Finally, the course has a longer class meeting time (2 � hours twice a week) in order to accommodate film screenings.

More info: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/filmstudies/ and gblasini@uwm.edu


English 404 : Language, Power, & Identity sec 001
Patricia Mayes
Wed, 4:30-7:10

"This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies. English 404 can be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit. Materials consist of articles and book chapters on the library's e-reserve site, as well as the following text: Lippi-Green, Rosina (2012). English with an Accent, 2nd Edition. Routledge."

More info: mayes@uwm.edu


English 430 : Advanced Writing Workshop secs 001, 002, 003
Subtitle: creative nonfiction
Carol Ross
Tuesdays and Thursdays. 9:30, 11:00, 12:30

"English 430 is a small, 15-member advanced composition workshop, designed for already capable writers who have done considerable writing in the past and who want to further develop their prose style. Its focus is literary/creative nonfiction--that is, writing in which the content is based on experience and observed or researched facts (nonfiction) and writing in which the style is creative (literary/narrative). How writers say something will be as important as what they say. Students will have the opportunity to read and write short narratives in three different genres of creative nonfiction: memoir, character story, and essay of place. Students are expected to have very good control already of grammar and mechanics since these are basics of writing. Required textbooks: a class reader prepared by the instructor each semester and Strunk and White's The Elements of Style. Other readings are on library reserve/e-reserve. We also use D2L for online discussions of writing. These sections are intended for juniors, seniors, and university special students and do not carry graduate credit."

More info: cross@uwm.edu


Eng 444: Technical Editing (U/G; online)
Rachel Spilka

This course is ideal for undergraduate or graduate students who are considering a future career that will involve editing. It is a hands-on practicum in which students are responsible for both individual and collaborative editing projects. Students learn that in work contexts, the scope of editing tasks can vary dramatically: In some cases, editors �fix up� minor grammatical and usage errors (copyediting); in other cases, editors question, �re-envision,� and then reshape major aspects of a document such as its purposes, target audiences, content, style, organization, and design (comprehensive editing). The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to handle both copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks -- and to edit both hard copy and electronic documents � in future work contexts. A secondary emphasis is on helping students better understand the roles and responsibilities of editors, the ethical dimensions of editing, how editors contribute to document effectiveness, how editors relate to writers during a document�s life cycle, and what is involved in becoming a successful editor.

Weekly course assignments are likely to include discussion forum posts on ethical issues and the editor-writer relationship, in addition to �mini assignments� aimed at developing skills and practice in copyediting; relearning (or learning for the first time) the fundamentals of English grammar, spelling, mechanics and usage; and gaining competence in proofreading and editing visuals and quantitative material. Major editing assignments are likely to include copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks on actual work documents from a variety of content areas (such as public policy, science, and health/medicine). A final collaborative course project will involve working in a small team to conduct a comprehensive edit on an actual organization�s document, website, or set of documents.

More info: spilka@uwm.edu


English 449: Writing Internship in English
Rachel Spilka

This flexible-credit internship is an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to gain �real world� writing or related experience that can supplement their academic credentials and broaden their marketability for postgraduate positions in both academia and industry. Internship placements are available in publishing, public relations/advertising, and non-profit agencies and larger businesses or corporations. Students might be called upon to complete a variety of tasks in an internship placement, but typically their work involves research, writing, editing, design, proofreading, and other activities related to creating quality documentation.

Students can enroll for ENG 449 for 1-4 credits per term and if they wish, they can take the course multiple times (at the same internship placement or different placements) up to a total of 9 credits. Most students prefer to take the course for 3 credits, which means that they will spend an average of 10-15 hours each week on internship work.

If you are interested in setting up a fall internship, contact Rachel Spilka at spilka@uwm.edu between April and August 1, 2013. Note that it commonly takes between 3-5 weeks to move through the process to find and then finalize a placement, so if you are interested in taking ENG 449 this fall, do your best to contact Dr. Spilka at least a month before the fall term begins.

More info: spilka@uwm.edu


English 460 : Writers in American Literature, 1500-1900 sec 001
Subtitle: Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson
Rebecca Dunham
Tues, Thurs 12:30-1:45

"The nineteenth-century poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson gave birth to a uniquely American poetry, and influenced the writing of several generations of American writers since then. Both wrote out of a moment of crisis in American history, the Civil War, and their poetry is marked by an engagement with both the social world of their day and a spiritual questing. In this course we will study their poems in depth, discussing them politically, thematically, and at the level of form. Students will write two 8-10 page essays and take weekly quizzes on the reading. Texts will include several essays illuminating aspects of the poets' work, Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman, and The Poems of Emily Dickinson."

More info: dunham@uwm.edu


English 461: Writers in American Literature 1900 to the Present
Subtitle: Mysterious Circumstances: U.S. Detective Fiction
Prof. Theodore Martin
Tues + Thurs 11a to 12.15p

In this course, we�ll survey the American detective novel from its origins in the nineteenth century to its revival in the twenty-first. As this historical scope suggests, detective fiction is one of our most resilient genres. It is also one that has constantly evolved: from the ratiocinations of the first literary detectives to the hard-boiled crime writing of the early-twentieth-century to the �anti-detection� of postmodernism. Across these different moments in the genre�s development, the detective novel reveals itself to be both formal and political: it poses questions about law, ethics, guilt, and sociality while also compelling us to reflect on the nature of narrative itself. Our goal in this class will be to investigate the history of U.S. detective fiction along both of these lines. We�ll be focusing on forms of narrative resolution and irresolution; on problems of truth, facticity, and reliability; on constructions of masculinity and gender; on the role of race; and finally, on the inescapable parallel between detection and interpretation�that is, between the work of the detective and the work of reading itself.

As an object of semester-long study, the detective novel will turn out to have a number of practical uses as well. Students in this course will become familiar with major authors and literary movements of the twentieth century; will learn to practice both close reading and the analysis of narrative form; and will be introduced to larger questions about the logic of literary history and the nature of literary criticism.

Authors to be read will include, among others, Edgar Allan Poe, Anna Katherine Green, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Patricia Highsmith, Chester Himes, Ishmael Reed, and Michael Chabon.

More info: marti449@uwm.edu


English 633 : Seminar in Rhetoric & Writing sec 001
Subtitle: Writing & Publishing for Mobile Media
Stuart Moulthrop
Tuesdays 4:30-7:10

We will explore the origins, state of the art, and emerging prospects for literary publishing (all forms and genres) on post-print platforms such as e-readers, tablet computers, and smart phones. Examples and assigned texts will demonstrate a variety of approaches, from basic e-books to advanced interactive media. Critical readings will establish frameworks for consideration of interface design, digital literacies, and impact of of contemporary (especially social) media. Labs and demonstrations will introduce a variety of free or low-cost tools for producing e-texts. Course work includes both critical reflection on existing products and design/production of at least one original text.

More info: www.tinyurl.com/mobiPub and moulthro@uwm.edu


English 709 : Rhetoric, Writing, and Information Technology sec 201
Dave Clark
Online

"This course explores theories, practices, and tools used by professional documentation specialists. Our topics will include knowledge management, information architecture, information design, and of course instructional writing. While designing and producing individual and group projects, students will have the opportunity to gain both theoretical and practical experience with designing and writing tools, processes, and languages. Projects will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis and usability testing, and collaboration. This course does not assume any prior technical expertise, and students from all plans and majors are welcome."

More info: dclark@uwm.edu


616 Advanced Workshop in Poetry
Microbrews: prose poems, flash fiction, and very brief essays
Mauricio Kilwein Guevara
T 5-7:40pm

When I was a little boy lying on my back in a field of grass in a coal-mining town in southwestern Pennsylvania, I had a sort of awakening about the paradoxical nature of perspective, although such language was completely unknown to me then. A jet was flying across the sky at the same moment that a lightning bug was walking on my index finger. I remember thinking how great the tiny creature was. In fact, because I could attend to it in all its particularity of detail, the little bug�and my finger with its topographic swirls�seemed gargantuan, while the jet, dragging its vapor chalk across the blue, might just have been the tiniest thing in the universe. Human beings hadn�t yet landed on the moon, but within months people would talk to one another from the surface of that bone-bright disk. It�s this kind of miniaturist/maximalist energy and wonder that I hope we�ll try to draw on as we explore how vast or microscopic, hallucinatory or realistic, we can make a paragraph, a sentence, or phrase.

This course, Microbrews, will work on several levels: reading of literary texts; discussing an assortment of very short literary texts for pleasure, understanding, and context; writing, sharing, and discussing our work of this kind; and writing a 5-7pp. critical/researched essay. We will read and write very short forms (anywhere from a few sentences to a few pages in length): our genres of practice will include prose poems, flash fictions, and very brief essays. Please remember that ours is a supportive classroom, where constructive questions and comments are always welcome. I anticipate that you have upper-level undergraduate competence as a literary writer. More importantly, I assume you want to continue to improve, experiment, and to grow as a literary artist and commentator, so that I hope you welcome well-intentioned and sophisticated feedback from me and from your peers.

More info: maurice@uwm.edu


English 716 : Poetic Craft and Theory
Subtitle: Manuscript Workshop
Rebecca Dunham
Thursdays 3:30-6:10

"This is an intensive workshop designed for students in the mid to later stages of their degree in poetry. Though close-reading will occupy some of our class time, we will emphasize assessment of each poet�s direction and development. We will also read model texts � both chapbooks and books of poetry. In the course of the semester, each of you will submit two manuscripts for discussion, and most nights two manuscripts will be discussed. If you are in your third year or beyond, your first manuscript should be approximately 18-24 pages of your dissertation/thesis (or proto-thesis). This may be a section of your manuscript, a group of related poems, or a representative sampling of several aspects of the collection. If you are in your first or second year, you may submit 12-16 pages of a single long poem, a group of related poems, or a selection of your best work to date. Your second manuscript will be an extension of the first manuscript, though some of the poems may be the same. For the final project, students in their first two years will turn in a chapbook of poems (25-30 pages in length). Students in their third year or beyond will turn in a full manuscript of poems (48-64 pages in length). Students will also write two 500-1000 word papers, each analyzing the sequence and structure of a single book of poems."

More info: dunham@uwm.edu


English 806 : Seminar in Linguistics sec 001
Subtitle: Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis
Patricia Mayes
Mon, 5-7:40

"Part theory, part methodology, this course is designed for graduate students in English and other language arts fields, who are interested in the study of naturally occurring social interaction. Ethnomethodology was developed by Harold Garfinkel in the mid-1950s and was influenced by the work of microsociologist Erving Goffman as well as the branch of philosophy known as phenomenology. It was later developed into the subdiscipline of Conversation Analysis (CA) by researchers at UCLA. CA might be described as a branch of microsociology that focuses on social action as revealed through verbal and non-verbal actions. Currently, this area is experiencing widespread and growing interest across many disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, perhaps due to its strict focus on both empirical evidence and the moment-to-moment, emergent nature of individual actions and reactions. Indeed, it might be argued that emergence is an idea �whose time has come� in part because recent technological developments and social upheavals have made change (and emergence) seem more relevant, but also because of a growing understanding of the dynamic nature of context and its role in shaping human behavior. CA focuses our attention at this level of human behavior. Early in the course, students will be asked to collect some data from a social setting they are interested in, and we will apply the theoretical and methodological approaches studied in the readings to these data, culminating in a final research project. Although traditionally CA researchers have focused on �talk-in-interaction� (i.e., spoken discourse), current trends are broadening this focus to include new media and multimodality. The reading materials for this course will consist of scholarly articles placed on e-reserve."

More info: mayes@uwm.edu



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Spring 2013

English 214 : Writing in the Professions sec 001
Subtitle: Global Business Communication
Sonia Khatchadourian
TR, 9:30-10:45 a.m.

"This course counts as an elective for the BA in Global Studies & the International Studies Major This course will introduce and familiarize students with fundamental aspects of global business communication. Topics that will be included are: � The values and practices of other cultures that affect their communication styles � The role that technology, especially e-mail, has in global business communication � Appropriate format, organization, and writing style of documents (letters, e-mails/memos) for an international audience (region/culture specific) � Appropriate communication channels for an international audience (region/culture specific) � Oral and non-verbal communication (covered in a limited capacity). � Other topics that may be included are: o A comparative analysis of business ethics o Website analysis. We will discuss readings, analyze documents, do writing exercises that focus on format, style, organization, and content appropriate for other cultures, conduct interviews and locate sources for research-related projects, and share our findings. Required Text: Varner, Iris and Linda Beamer. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN THE GLOBAL WORKPLACE (5th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill, 2010. ISBN: 978-07-337774-2.:"

More info: soniak@uwm.edu


English 233 : Introduction to Creative Writing sec 005
David Bowen
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9:30 AM-10:45 AM

This course has three main objectives: To introduce you to elements of writing craft, to prepare you for future writing workshops, and to make you more familiar with contemporary writers and the literary landscape�particularly literary magazines and journals. You will leave this course having practiced a variety of forms and techniques, studied prominent literary figures writing in multiple genres, and learned how to give and receive constructive feedback in a writing workshop setting. Janet Burroway's Imaginative Writing will serve as our primary course reader.

More info: dbowen@uwm.edu


English 236 : Introductory Topics in Creative Writing sec 001
Subtitle: Digital Storytelling and Role-Playing
Trent Hergenrader
Mon/Wed, 9:30-10:45

In this course students will use role-playing games and gaming principles to collaboratively construct a deeply immersive world. Students will populate this world with people to meet, places to find, and things to discover, and then will develop well-rounded characters who will explore this created world through role-playing gameplay. Students will then write a series of flash fiction stories describing the unique experiences of their characters. We will spend a significant amount of time in role-playing sessions and discussing the narratives that emerge from role-playing.

More info: http://www4.uwm.edu/schedule/syllabi/213246075.doc, wth@uwm.edu


English 243 : Introduction to literature by women sec 001
Subtitle: Voices from South Asia:Literature and Culture
Suchi Banerjee
Mondays, Wednesdays, 2.00-3.15pm

This course will focus on South Asian literature and culture. It will frame women's literature by looking at pre and post-colonial history and analyze how women have been represented and how representations have changed. The class will use literary texts like novels, short stories and memoirs along with documentaries and films to further our understanding about South Asian culture.

More info: banerje4@uwm.edu


English 245 : The Life, Times and Work of a Literary Artist sec 001
Subtitle: W.B. Yeats
Michael E. Beebe
Mon/Wed 11a-12:15p

"William Butler Yeats (b. Dublin, Ireland; 1865-1939) has been called ""the greatest twentieth-century poet of our language,"" but that description alone fails pitifully to encompass the depth and breadth of his significance. In one of the truly monumental of all literary lives, Yeats was a writer, a publisher, a patron, a politician, a national symbol and a celebrated embodiment of the heroic artist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 - a time when, we now know, his greatest works were still yet to be written. His career ultimately spanned six decades; in that time his homeland, Ireland, would be violently transformed from a colonial backwater to a free nation fighting to define its place in the modern world. Yeats's intellectual and artistic development amid that turbulent national climate ensured his complex, but lasting, transcendence in Irish culture. For, while his early career was marked by patriotic energy, his perception of a changing Ireland and of his own works would lead to bitterness, disillusionment and obsession later in life. Yeats is now known as much for his fascination with mortality and the occult as for his grand literary vision or national importance. I encourage you to join me for a semester with W.B. Yeats. The course literature will include many works that have helped shape our contemporary literary discipline. Our discussions will consider nation, history, myth, modernity, art, aesthetics and Yeats himself - a man at the place where those powerful constructs collide."

More info: mebeebe@uwm.edu


English 248 : Literature and Contemporary Life sec 002
Subtitle: Growing Up in Comics and Graphic Novels
Mark Heimermann
Tu/Th, 11:00-12:15

"In this course, we will be reading comics primarily written for adults that all focus on youth. We will consider children who never age, youth who are marked as different, and youth as a liminal stage � neither child nor adult. What do these (and other) constructions of youth reveal about our culture and ourselves? We will also be discussing a variety of themes based on the individual readings. No prior experience with comics or other graphic narratives is required. The course texts are still being determined, but will include the following: Alison Bechdel�s FunHome, Charles Burns� Black Hole, Daniel Clowes� Ghost World, and Bill Watterson�s Calvin and Hobbes."

More info: heimerm5@uwm.edu


English 248 : Literature and Contemporary Life sec 001
Subtitle: Queer Theory and the Novel
Shawna Lipton
MoWe 9:30AM - 10:45AM

This course provides an introduction to Queer Theory alongside five novels by diverse authors. We will develop an understanding of gender and sexuality that emphasizes shifting boundaries, ambivalences, and cultural constructions that change depending on historical and cultural context. By thinking through the relation between literature and queer studies, we will examine the connections between aesthetics and politics, culture and society, story and life.

More info: http://pantherfile.uwm.edu/selipton/www/, selipton@uwm.edu


English 260 : Introduction to Poetry sec 001
Subtitle: Pirated Poetics
Ching-In Chen (listed as Elizabeth Chen)
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:30-4:45 p.m.

Our class will investigate poetry using some form of piracy (including borrowing, stealing, collage, assemblage) as a creative strategy. We will read a wide range of texts with a focus on contemporary poetry, drawing from various traditions such as hiphop, spoken word and performance poetry, assemblage and other visual arts, electronic and digital poetry, neo-benshi (live narration of film) and documentary poetics, with the goal of becoming better readers, writers, and critics of contemporary poetry. Students will make their own forms of pirated poetry, based on techniques we discuss and learn about in class. Course texts will include Doug Kearney's The Black Automaton, Craig Santos Perez's From Unincorporated Territory [Hacha], and selections from Saul Williams, Bhanu Kapil, Mark Nowak, M. Nourbese Philip, Juan Felipe Herrera, Jai Arun Ravine, Christian Bok, Cathy Park Hong, Damian Lopes, Sharon Bridgforth, Brian Kim Stefans and others.

More info: ecchen@uwm.edu


English 277 : Introduction to Ethnic Minority Literature sec 001
Subtitle: Hurricane Katrina, Race, and Film
Lee M. Abbott
MW 11-12:15

"English 277 is described by the UWM Schedule of Classes as a �survey covering literature by three or more of the following ethnic groups: African American, American Indian, Asian American, U.S. Latino/a and Caribbean American.� Our particular section will more narrowly focus on writing and filmmaking that responds to the circumstances of Hurricane Katrina and explores the culture of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, where new cultural practices in literature, film, activism, and architecture respond to the social upheaval of Hurricane Katrina. In particular, we�ll take a look at: - testimonials and memoirs from survivors and those continuing to rebuild the city - social movements and activism - documentary films - poetry and fiction responding to the disaster - new directions in architecture and neighborhood rebuilding - the continuing work to recover New Orleans� famous social and cultural heritage The study of literature and film in post-Katrina New Orleans cannot be separated from the study of the social and economic circumstances that have systematically marginalized women, the elderly, the poor, and communities of color. The cultural response to Katrina, in fact, represented a national awakening to these circumstances as artists and writers have struggled to respond to it. Drawing on their works, we will be learning how the circumstances and struggles of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast enabling us to think critically about race, class, gender, and inequality in America today."

More info: abbott@uwm.edu


English 278 : Intro World Literature
Subtitle: Literature from the Middle East
Dalia Gomaa
T&TR 2:00-3:15

"English 278: Spring 2013 Intro World Literature Written in English: (war, violence, and women in the Middle East) Tuesday and Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM PHY 147 In this course we will specifically focus on what is politically called the �Middle East.� All the books and the movies that we will work with are in English; so don�t worry about your lack of familiarity with a different language. We will read texts about/from Iran, Israel, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine, Egypt, Algeria, and Morocco. We will start with geographically locating these countries and explore/critique stereotypes that prevail their representations in media. This course is organized in such a way that it does not only aim at informing and familiarizing you with writings by writers from the �Middle East� but also urges you to do some research on your own and attempt taking a part in the theoretical/academic conversations going on between these writers who we will read. You will be asked to put a weekly short comment on the class D2L website on the readings that we cover during the week. Almost every week, each one of you will be asked to lead the discussion and write a one and half or two page presentation about the assigned reading. Required Readings (tentative): 1)A Sister to Scheherazade (by Asia Djebar, 1993) 2)Palace of Desire (by Naguib Mahfouz, 2006) 3)Persepolis (by Marjane Satrapi, 2003) 4)Contemporary Iraqi Fiction: An Anthology (by Shakir Mustafa, 2008) 5)Open Closed Open: poems (by Ehuda Amichai, 2006) 6)Waltz With Bashir: A Lebanon War Story (by Ari Folman and David Polonsky, 2009) 7)Sitt Marie Rose (by Etel Adnan, 1982) 8)Hikayat: Short Stories by Lebanese Women (by Roseanne Saad Khalaf, 2007) 9)Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood (by Fatima Mernissi, 1994) 10)Wild Thorns (by Sahar Khalifeh, 2000)"

More info: dmgomaa@uwm.edu


English 290 : Introduction to Film Studies
Tasha Oren
ONLINE

"Love movies? Learn about the basics of film style, criticism, story structure and what makes movies work. This course introduces students to the basics of film analysis, formal elements, genre, and narrative structure and helps develop skills to recognize, analyze, critique and enjoy film as an art and entertainment form. The class includes weekly readings and (online) screenings, writing assignments and online discussion."

More info: tgoren@uwm.edu


English 306 : Survey of Irish Literature sec 001
Jos� Lanters
Tuesdays 3:00-6:10 PM

"Irish literature is as rich and varied as the country�s history. �Irishness,� however, is not an innate quality, but a cultural and political construct that is constantly re-�invented.� Beginning with the earliest extant poems and legends (translated from the Irish), and moving via the Anglo-Irish period of the eighteenth and nineteenth century and the Irish Literary Revival of the turn of the twentieth century to a more urban and cosmopolitan contemporary perspective, this course offers an introduction to Irish writing and an exploration of several varieties of �Irishness� as they are expressed through the literature. Assessment Two papers Midterm exam Final exam Books Marie Heaney, Over Nine Waves. Faber & Faber. ISBN 9780571175185, circa $14.00. J. Harrington, ed. Modern and Contemporary Irish Drama. W.W. Norton. ISBN 0393932435, circa $25.00. Roddy Doyle, The Commitments. Vintage. ISBN 0679721746, circa $14.00. Bernard MacLaverty, Cal. W.W. Norton. ISBN 0393313328, $14.00. William Trevor, ed. The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories. Oxford. ISBN 0199583145, circa $20.00. Course reader (Clark Graphics): circa $15."

More info: lanters@uwm.edu


English 328 : Forms of Experimental Literature
Subtitle: Monstrous Progeny
Stuart Moulthrop
ONLINE

"Experimental" in this case means trans-media: the course looks at three texts that exist in print, cinema, and some digital mediation, exploring these transformations through the lens of Promethean invention, or "monstrosity." Appropriately, we begin with _Frankenstein_ and make our way to Alan Moore's _Promethea_, with _Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy_ in the middle. Writing assignments mix traditional research papers with creative and experimental options. Discussion and other weekly business in D2L forums.

More info: http://pantherfile/moulthro/courses/monstrousProgeny.htm, moulthro@uwm.edu


English 414 : Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 002
Subtitle: Ambiguous Utopias, Alternate Worlds
Jim Chapson
TR 3:30-4:45

This course will investigate the concept of literary utopias and dystopias. The first half of the semester will focus on several classic texts; the second half will be a writing workshop in which students will develop fictional narratives of their own with feedback from the instructor and the class.

More info: jchapson@uwm.edu


English 414 : Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 001
Subtitle: Literary Journal Production
Valerie Laken
Mondays 6:30-9:10 p.m.

Ever wonder how a magazine comes to be? In this course we�ll learn the process step by step, working as a collective to produce a literary and arts journal showcasing work by UWM students. We will develop a budget plan; solicit, generate, and edit content; develop a design scheme and promotional campaign; manage page layouts and typesetting; and work with a printer to produce a finished product we can be proud to distribute. Along the way, we will meet with local and nationally renowned editors and learn a variety of skills that will help you in today�s job market.

More info: laken@uwm.edu


English 430 : Advanced Writing Workshop sec 001, 002, 003
Carol Ross
Tuesdays, Thursdays 9:30, 11:00, and 12:30

"English 430 is a small, 15-member advanced composition workshop, designed for already capable writers who have done considerable writing in the past and who want to further develop their prose style. Its focus is literary/creative nonfiction--that is, writing in which the content is based on experience and observed or researched facts (nonfiction) and writing in which the style is creative. How writers say something will be as important as what they say. Students will have the opportunity to read and write short narratives in different genres of literary nonfiction: memoir, character, and essay of place. Students are expected to have very good control already of grammar and mechanics since these are the basics of writing. Required textbooks: a class reader prepared by the instructor (estimated cost $11); Strunk and White's _The Elements of Style_ (ca. $11 new). Other texts are optional; other required readings will be on library reserve. Sections 001, 002, and 003 are intended for juniors, seniors, and university special students and do not carry graduate credit."

More info: cross@uwm.edu


English 431 : Topics in Advanced Writing
Subtitle: Social, Political & Ethical Issues in Scientific & Technical Communication
Scott Graham
Tuesdays 4:30

Students in this course will investigate social, political, and ethical issues in a wide variety of scientific and technical communication contexts. In so doing, students will interrogate the very nature of technical communication practice and research, exploring how different theoretical models of technical communication create varying ethical commitments and problems. Students will further explore the social and political issues that arise from the communication of complex scientific and technical information in popular culture, law, and public policy. Specific course units will include 1) ethical issues which arise from the humanist/instrumentalist debates in technical communication, 2) critical-interventional theories of technical communication, 3) the ethics of visual design, 4) legal and cultural appropriations of technical information, and 4) the role of technical communicators in science and technology policy.

More info: http://sscottgraham.com/archives/355, grahams@uwm.edu


English 439 : Document Design sec 001
Dave Clark
Tuesdays, 5:30 - 8:10

This course provides a practical and theoretical overview of document and information design. We begin with examinations of design theories and conventions coming from graphic artists, usability experts, cognitive psychologists, and technical communication scholars, and then critique those theories and conventions as we apply them to the analysis and creation of technical and professional documents. Topics include typography, color, text and page layout, data displays (e.g., tables, charts, graphs), diagrams and illustrations, and the managing, storing, tagging, and reuse of information. Throughout, we will focus on document usability in print and online production. This course is appropriate for all students with an interest in information design or who see themselves producing professional documents for a future workplace.

More info: dclark@uwm.edu


English 504 : Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature
Subtitle: Sex and Enlightenment
Professor Kalter
MW 2-3:15

"English 504: Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature: Sex and Enlightenment The Enlightenment is commonly understood as a philosophical movement that affirms society�s progressive discovery of universal moral principles and nature�s laws through the public use of critical reason. Sexuality, by contrast, is often seen as a private facet of identity that emanates in unruly ways from the body and its passions. This course will explore the relation between these contradictory categories as represented in eighteenth-century literature, considering: 1) modern notions of sexuality as products of Enlightenment thought; 2) the challenges sex poses to Enlightenment values of self-control, equality, normalcy, and consent. Our discussion will center on the following: the bawdy poetry of the Earl of Rochester and The Libertine, a film of his life starring Johnny Depp; Eliza Haywood�s Love in Excess, an early bestseller rivaled in popularity only by Robinson Crusoe; John Cleland�s pornographic Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure; and Matthew Lewis�s The Monk, a Gothic tale of religious prohibition, transgressive desire, and revolution. We will also read selections from works by Enlightenment intellectuals, including the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and the Marquis de Sade, as well as recent theorists, such as Michel Foucault and Laura Kipnis. Topics to be discussed include: libertinism as instance of and resistance to political tyranny; romantic love, intimacy, and private life; pornography, censorship, and freedom of expression; prostitution, urban sexual subcultures (e.g., the proto-homosexual mollies), and the legal and medical definition of deviance."

More info:

English 615 : Advanced Workshop in Fiction sec 002
Valerie Laken
Wednesdays 4:30-7:10 p.m.

In this course you will discover what it is like to live as a writer. You will do this by writing and reading every day, sharing your work and feedback with your peers, and doing the difficult work of revision. We will review the craft skills essential to fiction writing, such as characterization, plot, tension, and setting, and will begin to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which successful stories can defy convention, manipulate expectations, and expand the art of fiction. We�ll study published stories that model strategies such as point and counterpoint, nonlinearity, adapted and experimental forms, rhyming action, and more. We�ll do experiments to help generate and develop stories and to refine our sense of what a story should do and be. Each student will write and workshop two new stories and carefully revise one of them.

More info: laken@uwm.edu


English 631 : Seminar in African American Literature
Subtitle: The Harlem Renaissance in Literature, Music, and Film
Gregory Jay
Wednesdays 4:30-7:10

Harlem. New York City. 1920. �The New Negro� revolution sends shock waves through American culture and politics. Writers such as Langston Hughes, W. E. B. Du Bois, Nella Larsen, and Zora Neale Hurston remake modernism through the resources of race consciousness. Blues singers such as Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday give voice to black women�s experience in songs that shatter the traditions of popular music. African American actors, dancers, comics, and jazz bands appear on stage and in the movies, deconstructing old stereotypes and creating new forms of expression quickly taken up by Americans of every skin color. In this course we will examine how the Harlem Renaissance happened, how it blossomed and waned, and the ways its legacy still shapes culture in the United States and around the world.

More info: https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/gjay/www/english631.pdf, gjay@uwm.edu


Fall 2012

For an updated list (PDF) of fall 2012 English undergraduate courses, click here!


English 192: Freshman Seminar sec 006 U
Subtitle: The Translation Game: Hidden Meanings in Language
Jennifer Mattson
2:00 PM-3:15PM MW

Does "I feel trapped" mean the same in male-speak as it does in female-speak? You are somewhat of an expert translator already, perhaps without even realizing it. When a girlfriend says, "Are you hungry?" you know it means SHE is hungry.

We will explore hidden and (mis)understood meanings between males and females, between advertisers and consumers, between politicians and voters, between Caucasians and African-Americans, between internationals who speak English as a second language and native speakers, between mainstream speakers of American English and non-mainstream speakers. We will also examine the language of political correctness, propaganda, text messaging, etc.

You will have the opportunity to interact with someone who speaks English as a second language, and will learn to recognize and observe various dialects, genderlects, sociolects, and idiolects. This will in turn make you more aware of the ways you and those around you use language. Your metalinguistic awareness will increase. And you will learn what all these things mean!

Students will discuss articles and metalinguistic awareness fieldwork assignments in small groups in class, listen to/watch audio and video clips of dialects and various language issues, take notes on information given in class, take three exams, and meet once a week (10 times) for an hour with an international conversation partner. The grading formula is 20% for each of three exams, 20% for conversation partner participation, and 20% for class participation and posting your language observations.

Required textbook (also on reserve in the library): Exploring Language, 12th edition, edited by Gary Goshgarian, 2010, Longman.

More info: jennifr@uwm.edu


English 192: Freshman Seminar U
Subtitle: Hmong American Literature and Life Stories
ML Buley-Meissner
Section 012 - 12:30 PM-1:45PM TR
Section 016 - 3:30 PM-4:45PM TR

Course Description: Extraordinary stories often are told by ordinary people - stories of courage, fear, sacrifice, strength, and hope. To understand people, we need to listen carefully as they tell us about their families, histories, and dreams of the future. This seminar will focus on such narratives by and about Hmong Americans, who have become an increasingly important part of this country since the Vietnam War. Students will read an essay collection exploring identity, family and community in contemporary Hmong American life; a recent collection of prose and poetry by young Hmong Americans; and a highly acclaimed Hmong American family biography. These texts illuminate not only individual lives, but also the historical and cultural circumstances shaping people's identities, communities, and sustaining values.

Course Work: Through reading, writing and informed discussion, we will address many challenging questions. For example, how differently do first-, second- and third-generation Hmong Americans view the importance of traditional values and the opportunities offered by this country for success and happiness? Across generations, how are Hmong Americans today involved in both cultural continuity and change? More specifically, how are young people developing bicultural identities as they fulfill family obligations and pursue individual aspirations? Through careful reading of the course books, we will consider possible answers in historical and cultural contexts. Documentary films will provide additional background information. Overall, this seminar will emphasize active learning through extensive reading, collaborative class work and individual research projects as we look into the dynamic development of Hmong American identities from the 1970s until now. The basic grading structure includes class participation - 20%; two take-home essay exams - 60%; and an individual (or small group) research project to be presented to the class - 20%.

Required Books: The three course books should be purchased at the start of the term. These include Hmong and American: From Refugees to Citizens, edited by Vincent K. Her and Mary Louise Buley-Meissner; How Do I Begin? A Hmong American Literary Anthology, edited by the Hmong American Writers Circle; and The Latehomecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir by Kao Kalia Yang. Also recommended is purchase of a writer's guide such as A Concise Guide to MLA Style and Documentation by Thomas Fasano.

More info: meissner@uwm.edu


English 209: Language in the US U
Kerstin Mendel
12:30PM-1:45 TR

The course surveys current language issues in the USA and explores the nature of language variation in the US and its social, historical and political significance. We'll investigate such topics as history and distinctiveness of American English and its regional and social varieties; discuss issues of multilingualism, diversity and attitudes to languages.

Required Text: Finegan, E., & J. Rickford. 2004. Language in the USA. Cambridge: CUP.

More info: KNMendel@uwm.edu


English 210: International English sec 001 U
Laura L. Ambrose
2:00 PM-3:15PM MW

As English has made-and continues to make-its way around the globe, radical changes to local languages and cultures have occurred. At the same time, however, English itself has been modified, adapted, and expanded, sometimes in unfamiliar and unrecognizable ways.

This course is a survey of English from its origins in the British Isles to its introduction and development in the Americas, Australia, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Several principal examples will be studied in detail. In doing so, we will also uncover many issues that accompany language globalization; such as, language change, loss of language and identity, language policy and standardization, and teaching and learning English.

More info: lambrose@uwm.edu


English 212: English Grammar and Usage U
Laura L. Ambrose
Section 001 - 4:00 PM-5:15PM MW
Section 002 - 2:00 PM-3:15PM TR

Precise, powerful, and sophisticated writing starts with clear, well-constructed sentences; this course is an in-depth study of these fundamental building blocks of English. Not only will we develop a vocabulary of basic grammatical terms and concepts for talking about the structure of the language, but we will also explore how this knowledge can be leveraged to create and edit texts more effectively.

More info: lambrose@uwm.edu


English 215: Introduction to English Studies U
Multiple sections

This course covers a wide variety of literary periods, genres, and theoretical approaches as an introduction to reading literature. Students will be exposed to critical cultural frames for approaching novels, short stories, poetry, film and more.


English 234: Writing Fiction sec 001 U
Subtitle: Structure and Technique
Kate Nesheim
11:00 AM-12:15PM MW

In this section of Writing Fiction: Structure & Technique, students will have the opportunity to develop their own style and improve their practices in writing literary fiction. Students will study and discuss important models and conventions of the genre, and engage regularly in workshops designed to improve writing skills through constructive, respectful peer review. Class readings, discussion, and assignments will focus on the following goals:

  • Making the most of the revision process.
  • Practicing forms of fiction writing that promote narrative tension and appeal to readers.
  • Building rapport with fellow writers in a workshop setting through respectful reading and commentary.
  • Writing a balanced, well-paced story: finding harmony between action, description, and what is left to the imagination.
  • Developing interesting and edifying characters.
  • Finding sources of inspiration, and working through "writer's block."
  • Practicing sentence forms that compliment the content of a narrative.

More info: olsonke@uwm.edu


English 236: Introductory Topics in Creative Writing sec 001 U
Subtitle: Playwriting
Colleen Abel
3:30 PM-4:45PM TR

Bring on the drama! This class will focus on introducing students to the basics of structure and dialogue in playwriting. Through weekly readings of classic and contemporary plays, exercises, and workshops, students will produce their own ten-minute plays, as well as one act of a three-act play.

More info: crabel@uwm.edu


English 243: Introduction to literature by women sec 001 U
Subtitle: Women and Society: History, Literature and Film
Suchismita Banerjee
9:30 AM-10:45AM MW

This course will look at some of the major social movements globally and see how women are represented in those movements through literature and film.

More info: banerje4@uwm.edu


English 247: Literature and the Human Experience sec 001 U
Subtitle: Theories of Revolution
Joel Seeger
3:30 PM-4:45PM MW

This course examines the concept of revolution both by looking at texts about (and from) specific historical revolutions and by considering cultural, social and artistic revolutions. The course begins by asking the question, ""What makes a text, an idea or an action revolutionary?"" and then looks at whether the concept of revolution is relevant and prevalent in our time.

Readings will include theoretical writings from authors like Marx, Freud, Benjamin and Derrida and Founding Documents from various historical revolutions as well as works of fiction, film and art that might (or might not) be classified as revolutionary.

More info: jsseeger@uwm.edu


English 248: Literature and Contemporary Life sec 001 U
Subtitle: Queer Theory and the Novel
Shawna Lipton
2:00 PM-3:15PM MW

This course will provide an introduction to queer theory. We will also read five novels by diverse authors that have had a wide impact. We will question: what is being said about gender? What is being said about sexuality? How are issues of queer identity complicated by intersections with race and class? By thinking through the relation between literature and queer studies, we will examine the connections between aesthetics and politics, culture and society, story and life.

More info: https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/selipton/www/
selipton@uwm.edu


English 276: Introduction to American Indian Literature sec 001 U
Subtitle: The American Indian Novel
Christopher Drew
12:30 PM-1:45PM MW

This course will focus on novels written by American Indians from 1900 to the present, as well as literary criticism of these novels. The bulk of the course will be centered on critical discussions of assigned texts. Assignments will include D2L postings, a midterm paper, and a final critical essay.

More info: cmdrew@uwm.edu


English 278: Introduction to World Literature sec 001 U
Subtitle: Literature from the Middle East
Dalia Gomaa
2:00 PM-3:15PM TR

In this course we will specifically focus on what is politically called the "Middle East." All the books and the movies that we will work with are in English; so don't worry about your lack of familiarity with a different language. We will read texts about/from Iran, Israel, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine, Egypt, Algeria, and Morocco. We will start with geographically locating these countries and explore/critique stereotypes that prevail their representations in media. This course is organized in such a way that it does not only aim at informing and familiarizing you with writings by writers from the "Middle East" but also urges you to do some research on your own and attempt taking a part in the theoretical/academic conversations going on between these writers who we will read. You will be asked to put a weekly short comment on the class D2L website on the readings that we cover during week. Almost every week, each one of you will be asked to lead the discussion and write a one and half or two page presentation about the assigned reading.

Required Readings (tentative):

1) A Sister to Scheherazade (by Asia Djebar, 1993)
2) Palace of Desire (by Naguib Mahfouz, 2006)
3) Persepolis (by Marjane Satrapi, 2003)
4) Contemporary Iraqi Fiction: An Anthology (by Shakir Mustafa, 2008)
5) Open Closed Open: poems (by Yehuda Amichai, 2006)
6) Waltz With Bashir: A Lebanon War Story (by Ari Folman and David Polonsky, 2009)
7) Sitt Marie Rose (by Etel Adnan, 1982)
8) Hikayat: Short Stories by Lebanese Women (by Roseanne Saad Khalaf, 2007)
9) Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood (by Fatima Mernissi, 1994)
10) Wild Thorns (by Sahar Khalifeh, 2000)

More info: dmgomaa@uwm.edu


English 306: Survey of Irish Literature sec 001 U
José Lanters
11:00 AM-12:15PM TR

Irish literature is as rich and varied as the country's history. "Irishness" is not an innate quality, but a cultural and political construct that is constantly re-"invented." Beginning with the earliest poems and legends, and moving via the Anglo-Irish perspective of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, and the Irish Literary Renaissance of the early twentieth century, to a more urban and cosmopolitan contemporary perspective, this course offers an introduction to Irish writing and an exploration of several varieties of "Irishness" as they are expressed through the literature.

Assessment: Two papers (25% each), Midterm exam (20%). Final exam (30%).

Books:
Marie Heaney, Over Nine Waves
John P. Harrington, ed., Modern and Contemporary Irish Drama
Roddy Doyle, The Commitments
Bernard MacLaverty, Cal
William Trevor, ed. Irish Short Stories
Course packet (Clark Graphics)

More info: lanters@uwm.edu


English 309: Survey of Contemporary American Literature sec 001 U
Theodore Martin
11:00 AM-12:15PM TR

In this course, we'll survey American writing since 1965. Our main task will be to discover what is distinctive about contemporary literature: what new ideas about language, politics, history, and identity do recent writers offer us? We will also work to put major authors of the period in historical and cultural context by examining the rise of the suburbs, the intensification of consumerism, technological change, race relations, ecological crisis, and the unprecedented interconnectedness of globalization. From fiction to poetry, from popular culture to the avant-garde, from abstract concepts to physical contexts, we will ultimately find ourselves wondering what makes literature "contemporary," and how contemporary literature can--or can't--help us map our own increasingly complex contemporary world. In addition to becoming familiar with major authors, literary movements, and historical events of the last fifty years, students in this course will also learn how to think critically about individual literary texts--how to pose incisive questions, identify interesting problems, and make meaningful arguments about language, style, and narrative.

More info: marti449@uwm.edu


English 360: Art of Poetry sec 001 U
Subtitle: How to Read a Poem
Barrett Kalter
12:30 PM-1:45PM MW

This course will cover the elements (rhyme, meter, figurative language, etc.), major forms (epistle, ode, sonnet, etc.), and central modes (elegy, pastoral, satire) of English poetry. �We will read a variety of significant works by British authors, with an emphasis on c. 1650-1850. �Poets to be read include: Donne, Marvell, Milton, Behn, Finch, Pope, Swift, Gray, Smith, Wheatley, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats. �We will also use Terry Eagleton�s "How to Read a Poem."

Note: This course may be used to fulfill a pre-1800 or pre-1900 English lit. requirement.

More info: bkalter@uwm.edu


English 380: Media and Society sec 401 U
Subtitle: Game Culture
Stuart Moulthrop and Trent Hergenrader
Lecture 11:00 AM-12:40PM Thursday plus discussion sections

This is a first course in the critical study of games, especially videogames, and the culture of participatory media to which they belong. It will introduce the concept of games and play as pat of a meaning-making activity; it will survey forms, conventions, and practices that inform the design and reception of games; it will outline major theoretical trends within the emerging field of Game Studies; it will examine the place of games in contemporary culture, and consider some of the problems and challenges they pose. The course is intended for students in any major who want to think critically, creatively, and yes, seriously about playful media. This will involve a certain amount of reading and writing (critical evaluation of games, applications and responses to theory), and also a good deal of game play, both in and out of class.

More info: moulthro@uwm.edu


English 404: Language, Power, and Identity sec 001 U/G
Patricia Mayes
Wednesday 4:30-7:10

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies. English 404 can be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

Course Materials

  • Lippi-Green, Rosina (2012). English with an Accent, 2nd Edition. Routledge
  • Readings on e-reserve in the library

More info: mayes@uwm.edu


English 416: Poetry Workshop sec 001 U
Rebecca Dunham
11:00 AM-12:15PM TR

In English 416, we will spend time discussing craft topics such as imagery, diction, and form, as well as studying how these techniques are used in model texts. Your own original writing assignments will build off of these discussions. Feedback on peer writing will be conducted in the workshop mode. Commenting on a classmate's poem can often lead to insights into your own writing. In both small groups and as a class, you will be responsible for commenting thoughtfully and constructively on your peers' work.

More info: dunham@uwm.edu


English 417: Readings for Writers sec 001 U
Subtitle: The Pleasures of Satire
James Chapson
3:30 PM-4:45PM MW

The aim of the course is to turn students into satirists by assimilating the satiric genius of several writers from the 17th to the 20th centuries. In the first half of the semester students will write brief critical responses to the assigned texts; in the second half students will turn in four original satires which will be workshopped in the class.

More info: jchapson@uwm.edu


English 430: Advanced Writing Workshop sec 001, sec 002, sec 003 U
Carol Ross
Multiple sections / times - see university online schedule

English 430 is a small, 15-member composition workshop, designed for already capable writers who have done considerable writing in the past and who want to further develop their prose style. Its focus is literary/creative nonfiction--that is, writing in which the content is based on experience and observed or researched facts (nonfiction) and writing in which the style is creative (literary/narrative). How writers say something will be as important as what they say. Students will have the opportunity to read and write short narratives in different genres of literary nonfiction: memoir, character, and essay of place. Students are expected to have very good control already of grammar and mechanics since these are the basics of writing. These sections are intended for juniors, seniors, and university special students; they do not carry graduate credit this semester.

Required textbooks: a class reader prepared by the instructor (estimated cost $11) and Strunk & White's _The Elements of Style_ (ca. $11 new). All other texts are optional; other required readings are on library reserve.

More info: cross@uwm.edu


English 515: Literature and the Other Arts sec 002 U/G
Subtitle: Poetry in Concert with the Visual Arts
Brenda Cardenas
5:00 PM-7:40PM W

In this course, we will explore various inter-arts works (some individually and others collaboratively composed), which integrate poetry with the visual arts. We will consider ekphrastic poetry written in response to visual art, as well as projects that juxtapose or merge text and image, such as concrete and visual poetries, collage, installations, digital vizpo, and book arts. To provide a framework for our investigation, we will also read critical/theoretical articles by scholars such as WJT Mitchell, Johanna Drucker, and others. Questions to bear in mind throughout the semester include the poets'/artists' processes and aesthetics in creating the works; how the visual and textual components mix, compliment, provide a counterpoint to, and/or are in conversation with one another; and what effects, tensions, ideas, and questions emerge from various combinations of these languages. Students will write short weekly reading responses and a longer, more focused critical paper. In addition, students will create their own ekphrastic and inter-arts works. Books to be announced.

More info: cardenab@uwm.edu


English 625: Seminar in Literary History sec 002 U/G
Subtitle: Eating English Lit
Barrett Kalter
3:30 PM-6:10PM W

This seminar in literary history considers writing about food during England's "long" eighteenth century (1660-1820), an era that stretches from the opening of the first London coffeehouses to the origin of the science of gastronomy. Our aim will be to create a detailed picture of how food was produced, experienced, and imagined in this period, and to that end we will read a variety of texts: poetry and fiction, philosophical essays, medical pamphlets, economic treatises, and of course cookbooks. For example, we will situate Grainger's The Sugar Cane, a poem about the West Indian sugar industry, within the context of British colonialism and slavery, before investigating the role affordable sweetness played in the rise of consumer society and the development of theories of taste by Burke and Hume. Other topics to be discussed: British beef and the formation of a national cuisine; Shelley's vegetarianism as an aspect of his radicalism; famine and population in Swift and Malthus. Students will prepare dishes using eighteenth-century recipes in order to explore the possibilities of knowing the past through the senses. Finally, because historical thinking involves making connections between past and present, we will read recent work by chefs and food writers such as Michael Pollan, Anthony Bourdain, and Barbara Kingsolver, and reflect on how their interests are anticipated by or depart from those of the eighteenth century. The course packet will cost about $35.


English 685: Honors Seminar sec 001 U
Subtitle: Law and Literature
Peter Sands
2:00 PM-3:15PM MW

What is justice? What is morality? What is law? What is truth? We spend our lives within a legal system, a framework of rules, regulations, and norms that shapes interactions between and among people and nations. We also organize our lives through narrative--fictive or real--using stories to shape both our actual experiences and our understanding of them. Both the legal system and literary expression are primarily experienced through language. In the case of law, language frames legal expression, but is also the primary tool through which law's authority is enforced. Literary texts, similarly, are framed through language, and can even challenge the legal system by exploring boundaries of convention--banned books are both literary and legal artifacts. This course first surveys the broad field of law and literature, then closely explores several specific texts that present problems in jurisprudence and moral philosophy at the core of our legal system. Readings will touch on the earliest intersections between the two--Aeschylus and the Old Testament--before moving on to closer looks at contemporary film and literature. Open to Honors College students. Can be used to satisfy requirements for the major in English.

Reading (subject to minor changes):
Aeschylus, The Oresteia
Grisham, John, A Time to Kill
Lee, Harper, To Kill a Mockingbird
Melville, Herman, "Benito Cereno" and "Bartleby the Scrivener"
Rosenbaum, Thane, ed. Law Lit: From Atticus Finch to the Practice: A Collection of Great Writing About the Law, (Selections)
Shakespeare, William, The Merchant of Venice

Viewing (subject to minor changes)
Lumet, Sidney (dir.), Twelve Angry Men
Mulligan, Robert (dir.), To Kill a Mockingbird
Thornton, Billy Bob (dir.), Sling Blade

More info: sands@uwm.edu


English 685: Honors Seminar sec 002 U
Subtitle: Asian American Women Writers
ML Buley-Meissner
5:30 PM-6:45PM TR

Course Description: Asian American women writers have made outstanding contributions to the multicultural literary heritage of our country. In this course, we will focus on the distinct voices, engaging narrative styles, and thought-provoking themes of Jade Snow Wong and Maxine Hong Kingston (Chinese American), Yoshiko Uchida and Rahna Reiko Rizzuto (Japanese American); and other American writers with diverse Asian heritages. The selections will provide the opportunity for close reading of literature ranging from classic (groundbreaking in the formation of Asian American literature) to contemporary (notable for exploring the diversity and complexity of characters' lives). The course books include two autobiographies, two novels and a short story collection. Documentary films will provide background for discussion of major issues addressed in the writers' work. Overall, our goals will be enhanced skill in literary analysis; investigation of themes related to self-identity, family relationships, American society and other subjects of continuing relevance; and better understanding of how Asian American authors have enriched our literary heritage.

Course Books: Jade Snow Wong, Fifth Chinese Daughter; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts; Yoshiko Uchida, Picture Bride; Rahna Reiko Rizzuto, Why She Left Us; and Charlie Chan Is Dead 2: At Home in the World, ed. Jessica Hagedorn.

Course Requirements: Basic course requirements include class participation (20%); three major essays during the term (60%); and an individual or small group research project for class presentation (20%).

More info: meissner@uwm.edu


Summer 2012


English 111: Entertainment Arts (First 4-Week Session)
Subtitle: Introduction to Film, TV and Digital Media
Gilberto M. Blasini
Fully online

Entertainment Arts 111 offers a general introduction to the critical study of film, television, and new media. While examining each technology individually we will also work in a state of persistent comparison, endeavoring to comprehend media culture as a larger phenomenon. There are no prerequisites for this course and you are therefore not expected to have any prior knowledge of media studies. We will begin with the premise that film, television, and new media offer much more than �entertainment� and, accordingly, studying these forms is a serious undertaking requiring rigor and diligence.

More info: gblasini@uwm.edu or check out the Film Studies website


English 209: English in the United States (May 29 - Jun 23)
Patricia Mayes
Fully online

Have you ever wondered how many varieties of American English there are? (Why use good morning, why not w�s up?) Have you ever wondered why we have different varieties of speech, or why it�s easy to tell a speaker from the south from a midwesterner? Is there really a standard spoken language, or are language standards only for writing? How do people perceive the different varieties and accents of American English, and what do people in other parts of the country think about the Wisconsin accent? (Is it really just about cheeseheads and bubblers?) What is the role of other languages in our changing multicultural society? And what do our ways of speaking say about our identities? (Are ya a Yooper, eh?) We�ll explore these and other questions in English 209. We�ll also investigate the future of our language: What�s the likely effect of new forms of technology and global communication? We�ll use short readings, discussion boards, and web sites like �Do You Speak American?� to look at these and other important issues affecting our evolving American speech patterns. y dont u sign ^ 2day!

English 209 satisfies Humanities GER credit. Note that this is a fully online course. You must have access to a computer and be able to access D2L to take this course.

More info: mayes@uwm.edu.


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Fall 2011

English 192: Freshman Seminar sec 004 U
Subtitle: Feminist Writing
Jane Gallop
MW 12:30 - 1:45 pm

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to feminist writing about literature, to familiarize students with the practice of "close reading," and to work on students' own academic writing.


English 192: Freshman Seminar U
Subtitle: Southeast Asian American Life Stories
Mary Louise Buley-Meissner
Sec 012: TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm
Sec 019: TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Course description (doc 26k) and Book list (doc 16k)


English 192: Freshman Seminar sec 018 U
Subtitle: Traditional Stories
Jacqueline Stuhmiller
TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Traditional stories can take many forms: myth, legend, folktale, fable, and parable, just to name some of the most well-known. Such stories typically have no set form and change depending on who's telling them and who's listening. Traditional stories tend to be populated by "flat" characters and recounted in highly formulaic language; they may or may not have clear "morals" or messages. To most Americans, such stories seem only appropriate for children, but in fact traditional stories are neither simple nor childish, and they are typically more difficult to understand than most contemporary literature.

Please note that some of reading for this class will contain strong sexual content, and that we will be analyzing several Biblical texts from a literary perspective.

Readings will include: Giovanni Boccaccio, The Decameron; Ovid, Metamorphoses; excerpts from the Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament; Maria Tatar, The Classic Fairy Tales; Jan Harold Brunvand, The Vanishing Hitchhiker.


English 205: Business Writing U

Business Writing is an introductory course designed to help students develop and refine their writing skills. In this class, students will learn to communicate more effectively in business environments. The three main goals for Business Writing are:

  • Develop workplace writing based on knowing the purpose and understanding the audience
  • Acquaint students with workplace writing situations and tasks related to audiences with whom they will communicate in a business/working environment
  • Introduce students to the most appropriate writing styles for different work-related situations that they may encounter


English 206: Technical Writing sec 001 U
Sonia Khatchadourian
MW 12:30 - 1:45 pm

Technical Writing prepares students to be effective communicators, particularly effective writers, in technical professions. Students will develop workplace writing skills and apply the technical and rhetorical principles that are the foundation of workplace writing. The course will introduce students to some of the basic issues, elements, and genres of technical writing including:

  • Writing for various audiences and purposes
  • Addressing social issues related to writing, such as ethics and gender
  • Defining, analyzing, and attempting to resolve workplace writing problems
  • Conducting primary and secondary research for writing
  • Writing collaboratively
  • Developing an effective professional tone and style
  • Incorporating effective visual elements into document design
  • Writing various technical documents (e.g., descriptions, proposals, instructions, and reports)


English 207: Health and Science Writing sec 001 U
Nancy Walczyk
MW 12:30 - 1:45 pm

Health Science Writing is directed at students enrolled in nursing, pre-medicine, pre-pharmacy, occupational therapy, speech, and allied health fields. The goal of the course is to teach students how to communicate clearly and effectively and to prevent misunderstandings that can interfere with good client or patient care. It also covers the basics of writing—such as letters, memos, and reports—that all professionals should know. Assignments may include writing instructions, policy & procedures statements, protocols, letters, memos, reports, patient information brochures, a literature review, a bibliography based upon medical databases, and one argumentative research paper on a current health issue.


English 212: Grammar and Usage U
Laura Ambrose
Sec 001: MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Sec 002: TR 2:00 - 3:15 pm

Precise, powerful, and sophisticated writing starts with clear, well-constructed sentences. This course is an in-depth study of these fundamental building blocks of English. Not only will we develop a vocabulary of basic grammatical terms and concepts for understanding the structure of the language, but we will also explore how this knowledge can be leveraged to create and edit texts more effectively.


Film Studies 212: Intermediate Topics in Film Studies sec 002 U
Subtitle: Genres of Romance Across Media
Katie Morrissey
MW 9:00 - 10:50 am

Course description (pdf 857k)


English 235: Writing Poetry: Forms, Styles, Voices sec 001 U
Susan Firer
MW 12:30 - 1:45 pm

Course description (doc 28k)


English 236: Introduction to Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 002 U
Subtitle: The Graphic Novel
Melissa Morrow
TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of comics and graphic novels. Students will read a variety of comics and graphic novels, and will have the opportunity to develop their own comic panels and scripts as part of the course's final project. Students will analyze and discuss comics and graphics novels as they relate to history, culture, identity, society, genre, medium, technology, and production/production values. Primary texts include: The Arrival (Shaun Tan), "A Contract with God" (Will Eisner), The Complete Maus: A Survivor's Tale (Art Spiegelman), Palestine (Joe Sacco and Edward Said), Incognegro (Mat Johnson), Walking Dead (Robert Kirkman), Blankets (Craig Thompson), Batman: The Long Halloween (Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale), and Watchmen (Alan Moore).


English 240: Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture sec 001 U
Subtitle: Refugee Narratives & Rhetorics of Global Mobility
Michael MacDonald
MW 9:30 - 10:450 am

Course description and book list (doc 83k)


English 243: Introduction to Literature by Women sec 001 U
Subtitle: Madwomen in Attics
Ann Stewart
MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

In honor of PMS, of hysteria, of bitches, witches, uncommon scolds and crazy cat ladies, this course examines work by and about women who couldn't take it anymore. As women, we all step outside the bounds of those norms that confine us at one time or another. Whether we stopped shaving our legs or stopped smiling and staying quiet, went insane or went to work, women have struggled to occupy public space. We will investigate the ways women writers since the 19th century have expressed their anger and frustration in a world where women are expected to be pious, chaste, and submissive—expression that often made them outcasts and drove them deep into the attic of public consciousness…

We will read:

  • Carson McCullers, The Ballad of the Sad Café and Other Stories 978-0618565863
  • Gayl Jones, Eva's Man 978-0807063194
  • Harriet Wilson, Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black 978-0307477453
  • Charlotte Brontë , Jane Eyre 978-0307744227
  • Toni Morrison, Sula 978-0586049808
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea 978-0140818031
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own 978-0156030410

Course texts will be available at People's Books Co-op or online. The books are inexpensive, short, and having the version (ISBN number) listed above is not totally necessary, so if you have a copy already, you may use that. The syllabus will be available soon.


English 247: Literature and Human Experience sec 001 U
Subtitle: Imagining the Network/Networking the Imagination
Matt Trease
TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

Course description and texts (doc 28k)


English 248: Literature and Contemporary Life sec 001 U
Subtitle: Naturalizing the Unnatural
Christina Clancy
MW 9:30 - 10:45 am

The modern world is presented in literature as one in which pollution and toxicity are so rampant that it becomes almost impossible to discern what is natural from what is unnatural. Ecocritism explores the relationship between literature and the physical environment, asserts the importance of place in literature, and examines how human culture is connected to the physical world, as we are affecting it, and are affected by it. Our texts, including novels, short stories and films, reveal much about contemporary pollution anxieties. We will ask: what is natural and unnatural? Real, "hyperreal" and artificial? Dirty and clean?


English 263: Introduction to the Novel sec 001 U
Subtitle: The American Novel: Post World War II
Craig Medvecky
TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm

Course description and texts (doc 27k)


English 268: Introduction to Cultural Studies sec 001 U
Dalia Gomaa
TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

This class focuses on what it means to be "American" and what the term "new" American means. Emphasis will be on cultural aspects that shape definitions of these terms: TV shows, ads, movies, talk shows, newspapers, and fictional and non-fictional texts.


English 281: African American Literature sec 001 U
Subtitle: Novels and Plays
David Yost
TR 9:30 - 10:15 am

In this course, we'll explore 20th and 21st century African American novels and drama through text, film, and attendance at a live performance of the students' choice. Your assignments will consist of readings of plays and short novels, participation in online and in-class discussions, and two 3-5 page papers (the second of which will have a creative option). Authors we'll look at include Charles W. Chesnutt, Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Paule Marshall, Lorraine Hansberry, August Wilson, Dael Orlandersmith, and a final novel to be selected by class vote. This course fulfills GER requirements for Humanities and Cultural Diversity.


English 380: Media and Society sec 401 U/G
Stuart Moulthrop
W 11:00 am - 1:40 pm

DIS 601 with Trent Hergenrader: M 11:00 - 11:50 am
DIS 602 with Trent Hergenrader: M 12:00 - 12:50 pm

This is a first course in the critical study of games, especially videogames, and the culture of participatory media to which they belong. It will introduce the concept of games and play as part of a meaning-making activity; it will survey forms, conventions, and practices that inform the design and reception of games; it will outline major theoretical trends within the emerging field of Game Studies; it will examine the place of games in contemporary culture, and consider some of the problems and challenges they pose. For more information, please go to http://www.tinyurl.com/gameCult.


English 404: Language, Power, and Identity sec 001 U/G
Patricia Mayes
W 3:30 - 6:10 pm

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


English 414: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 001 U/G
Subtitle: Whitman's Children
Susan Firer
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Course description (doc 26k)


English 430: Advanced Writing Workshop U
Carol Ross
Sec 001: TR 9:30 - 10:45 am
Sec 002: TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Sec 003: TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm

English 430 is a small, 15-member advanced composition workshop, designed for already capable writers who have done considerable writing in the past and who want to further develop their prose style. Its focus is literary/creative nonfiction—that is, writing in which the content is based on experience and observed or researched facts (nonfiction) and writing in which the style is creative (literary/narrative). How writers say something will be as important as what they say. Students will have the opportunity to read and write narratives in different genres of literary nonfiction: memoir, character story, nature, and culture. Students are expected to have very good control already of grammar and mechanics since these are the basics of writing.

Required textbooks: a class reader prepared by the instructor (estimated cost $11); Strunk and White's The Elements of Style (about $11 new). All other texts are optional; other readings are on library reserve.

Sections 001, 002, 003 are intended for juniors, seniors, and university special students and do not carry graduate credit.


English 431: Topics in Advanced Writing sec 201 U/G
Subtitle: Professional Writing for Nonprofits
Sally Stanton
Online

This course explores the theory, practices, lore, and written communication used by professional writers in nonprofit or social sector workplaces, such as theatres, museums, libraries, social service agencies, art centers, humane societies, and other community organizations. Students will:

  • Learn the purpose and defining characteristics of the nonprofit sector.
  • Understand the critical role of written messages in communicating social sector values and results.
  • Explore persuasive writing strategies for nonprofits (including case statements, donor and constituent messages, and proposal-related communications).
  • Adapt business communication theories and strategies to the nonprofit sector.
  • Apply sector-specific theory and approaches to producing annual reports, websites, social media, grant reports, and unique documents such as artist statements and resumes, exhibition catalogs, and advocacy materials.

Students will gain practical experience in researching, designing, and writing documents commonly prepared by nonprofit professionals. Assignments will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis, and collaboration.


English 433: Creative Nonfiction for Publication sec 001 U/G
Carolyn Washburne
W 4:30 - 7:10 pm

In this course, students will write in a number of creative nonfiction formats, including the personal experience article, personal opinion essay, review, and profile, as well as a researched article using a creative nonfiction approach. The course will explore using fiction and poetry techniques, such as metaphor, dialogue, voice, and point of view, to make the nonfiction writing more eloquent and compelling. The course will also cover how to get nonfiction work published. To illustrate the principles being discussed, the class will critique published articles and evaluate each other's work in peer editing sessions and class workshop discussions.


English 435: Professional and Technical Writing sec 001 U/G
Nancy Nygaard
Online

This course is an orientation to the work and field of professional and technical writing. Students will develop foundational skills in researching, planning, drafting, and revising common types of workplace documentation as they complete individual and collaborative projects for either hypothetical or actual clients. Students will also gain skill in adapting documents for different types of audiences and analyzing writing projects rhetorically, contextually, and from a problem-solving perspective. One important segment of this course will be about job and career preparation; as students learn about "best practices" for job networking, interviews, and site visits in this field, they will develop their own electronic resumes, cover letters, and writing portfolios.


English 439: Document Design sec 001 U/G
Anne Wysocki
TR 4:00 - 5:15 pm

In this class we focus on producing documents that work: given the audience for whom you are creating a document, and given the purposes you hope to achieve with that audience, what strategies—of layout; size and material; typography; use of photograph, illustration, chart, or diagram; readability and usability—are appropriate? In other words, this is a course in the rhetoric of document design. Through producing and analyzing many different kinds of print documents (from simple, text-only single page layouts to multi-page instruction sets), you will learn how to work with differing current expectations about the strategies named above. This course is appropriate for all students with an interest in or need to produce documents for professional contexts. Students from all plans and majors are welcome.


English 442: Writing Center Tutoring Practicum sec 001 U/G
Margaret Mika

This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.

In many ways, learning to tutor well is a baptism-by-fire enterprise requiring hours of on-the-job practice. This course provides Writing Center tutors with a foundation of concentrated study and supervised practice from which to begin. Therefore, the first two-thirds of class will be frontloaded, i.e., conducted before the semester starts and 3 weeks before the Writing Center opens. We will meet for 10 hours over two days during the week prior to the first day of classes and again for 1.5 hrs, one Friday each month to complete the course requirements. As important as these formal classes will be the many day to day opportunities for tutors to talk with the director, the graduate assistant coordinator and fellow tutors once the Center opens.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required to enroll. Students must have attained junior status, successfully completed the Writing Center application process and hired as a prospective Writing Center tutor. All majors, especially non-English, are welcome.


English 443: Grant Writing sec 201 U/G
Sally Stanton
Online

Grant Writing combines richly descriptive storytelling and subtle persuasion within technical limits established by potential charitable funders of these organizations. The practical skill of preparing clear, concise grant proposals is valued and desired by employers in higher education, engineering, science and medicine, human services, the arts, and cultural institutions.

In this class, students will learn the basics of researching and writing effective, persuasive grants, and will then develop and apply that knowledge in an integrated service-learning project with a community-based nonprofit organization. They will learn how to research and analyze the sources of charitable funding information available to Milwaukee area organizations and how to effectively organize and present that information for writing grants. Students will leave this course with marketable skills and a greater knowledge of the ways in which effective communication adds value to the workplace.


English 445: Composing Process sec 001 U/G
Subtitle: Teaching Composing Processes
Alice Gillam
MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

This course is designed to introduce pre-service teachers to composing process theories and pedagogies as part of their preparation for teaching writing. Clearly, no single course, particularly one that does not include actual practice, can adequately prepare future teachers for the complexity and challenges of teaching writing. However, this course aims to begin that process by:

  1. introducing theories and debates related to the teaching of writing that can, in turn, serve as critical lenses for teaching and reflecting on practice;
  2. suggesting a repertoire of pedagogies that can be adapted and transformed to suit various classroom situations; and
  3. offering opportunities to develop and reflect on your own writing practices and identity as a writer.


English 454: Milton sec 001 U/G
Gwynne Kennedy
MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

The primary reading for the course will be John Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost, an enormously influential literary text. We will also read some of Milton's other poems and prose. The most substantial work we will do in the course is reading Paradise Lost—not easy, but very rewarding. It is a text best read in a group, rather than alone, so class discussion plays a large role. There will be weekly short responses, midterm and final exams, and a short paper.


English 523: Studies in US Latino/a Literature sec 001 U
Subtitle: Contemporary Latino/a Poetry
Brenda Cardenas
T 3:30 - 6:10 pm

In this course we will explore and analyze some of the major themes and aesthetic developments in contemporary United States Latino/a Poetry, with an eye on current trends. Of particular interest will be how the diverse poets we study treat issues of identity, history, place, language, the transnational/transcultural, the poet as public speaker, and the socio-political/geo-political issues of our time. In addition, we will analyze how the poets' various writing styles, aesthetic influences and approaches underscore, counterpoint, create or contradict the poems' content and context. Aided by the literary criticism of Latino/a Studies scholars, we will attempt to grasp the trajectory of this incredibly diverse and evolving body of literature.

Books will include one anthology (The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry, edited by Francisco Aragon), and five individual volumes by Puerto Rican/Eritean, Chicano, Colombian-American, New Mexican Hispana, and Cuban American poets: Aracelis Girmay's Teeth, Juan Felipe Herrera's Loteria Poems and Fortune Cards: A Book of Lives, Maurice Kilwein Guevara's The Autobiography of So-and So, Valerie Martinez's Each and Her, and Emma Trellis' Tropicalia. The course will include other poets and critical articles on e-reserve.


English 685: Honors Seminar sec 001 U
Subtitle: Chinese American Women Writers
Mary Louise Buley-Meissner
TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

Course description (doc 31k) and Book list (doc 15k)


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Summer 2011

University Online Schedule

English 312: Topics in Film Studies sec 291 U
Subtitle: Cinema and Digital Culture
Tami Williams
Online

Course description (doc 73k)


English 404: Language, Power, and Identity sec 091 U/G
Patricia Mayes
MTWR 1:00 - 3:30 pm
7/25-8/20

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


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Spring 2011

English 205: Business Writing U
Mariann Maris
Sec 012: TR 9:30 - 10:45 am
Sec 014: TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Sec 017: TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm

This business writing class will meet face-to-face for the first three weeks of class. After the first three weeks, the class will meet one week face-to-face and on-line (in a virtual world) the next week. There will be a Second Life link on the toolbar. During the first three weeks of class, students will learn more about ePortfolio and Second Life as learning tools.

Textbooks students will purchase:

  • eBook, M.E. Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 7th edition. Cost is $70 if purchased from Cengage/Aplia. (An online NOTE: The UWM bookstore's price for a hard copy of the 7th edition of Guffey is $185.85.)
  • Alred, Brusau, Oliu, Business Writers Handbook, 9th edition. Students can purchase an eBook version for $32.50 or the spiral bound, "hard" edition for $46.05. (Some used copies will be available at a cost of approximately $32).


English 209: Language in the United States sec 201 U
Dr. Patricia Mayes
Online

Have you ever wondered how many varieties of American English there are? (Why use good morning, why not w's up?) Have you ever wondered why we have different varieties of speech, or why it's easy to tell a speaker from the south from a midwesterner? Is there really a standard spoken language, or are language standards only for writing? How do people perceive the different varieties and accents of American English, and what do people in other parts of the country think about the Wisconsin accent? (Is it really just about cheeseheads and bubblers?) What is the role of other languages in our changing multicultural society? And what do our ways of speaking say about our identities? (Are ya a Yooper, eh?)

We'll explore these and other questions in English 209. We'll also investigate the future of our language: What's the likely effect of new forms of technology and global communication? We'll use short readings, discussion boards, and web sites like "Do You Speak American?" to look at these and other important issues affecting our evolving American speech patterns. y dont u sign ^ 2day!

English 209 satisfies Humanities GER credit. Note that this is a fully online course. You must have access to a computer and be able to access D2L to take this course. You can contact the instructor at mayes@uwm.edu.


English 210: International English sec 001 U
Laura Ambrose
MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

As English has made—and continues to make—its way around the globe, radical changes to local languages and cultures have occurred. At the same time, however, English itself has also been modified, adapted, and expanded, sometimes in unfamiliar and unrecognizable ways.

This course is a survey of English from its origins in the British Isles to its introduction and development in the Americas, Australia, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Several principal examples will be studied in detail. In doing so, we will also uncover many issues that accompany language globalization; such as, language change, loss of language and identity, language policy and standardization, and teaching and learning English.


English 212: Grammar and Usage U
Laura Ambrose
Sec 001: MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Sec 002: TR 2:00 - 3:15 pm

Precise, powerful, and sophisticated writing starts with clear, well-constructed sentences; this course is an in-depth study of these fundamental building blocks of English. Not only will we develop a vocabulary of basic grammatical terms and concepts for talking about the structure of the language, but we will also explore how this knowledge can be leveraged to create and edit texts more effectively.


English 214: Writing in the Professions sec 001 U
Subtitle: Global Business Communication
Sonia Khatchadourian
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

This new course offering will introduce and familiarize students with fundamental aspects of global business communication. Topics that will be included are:

  • the values and practices of other cultures that affect their communication styles,
  • the role that technology, especially e-mail, has in global business communication,
  • appropriate format, organization, and writing style of documents (letters, e-mails/memos) for an international audience (region/culture specific),
  • appropriate communication channels for an international audience (region/culture specific), and
  • oral and non-verbal communication (covered in a limited capacity).
  • Other topics may include a comparative analysis of business ethics and website analysis.

    We will discuss readings, analyze documents, do writing exercises that focus on format, style, organization, and content appropriate for other cultures, conduct interviews and locate sources for research-related projects, and share our findings. Also, there may be an opportunity to work on a collaborative project with Professional Writing students at the University of Applied Science in Munich, Germany.

    This course counts as an elective for the BA in Global Studies & the International Studies Major. If you have any questions, contact the instructor at soniak@uwm.edu.


    English 224: American Writers: 1900 to the Present sec 001 U
    Craig Medvecky
    TR 2:00 - 3:15 pm

    Course description, Prerequisites and Required course texts (pdf 69k)


    English 236: Introductory Topics in Creative Writing sec 002 U
    Subtitle: Gaming, World Building, and Narrative
    Trent Hergenrader
    MW 12:30 - 1:45 pm

    In this course students will use games and gaming principles to collaboratively construct a deeply immersive post-apocalyptic world. Students will populate this world with people to meet, places to find, and things to discover, and then will develop well-rounded characters who will explore this created world through role-playing gameplay. Students will then write a series of flash fiction stories describing the unique experiences of their characters.

    To round out our knowledge of the varieties of post-apocalyptic narratives across media, we will read a selection of post-apocalyptic short stories, watch two post-apocalyptic films, and play and discuss the post-apocalyptic role-playing video game Fallout 3. As we read, watch, and play, we will catalog our observations in a wiki that can be referenced as students begin building their unique post-apocalypse, developing their characters, and writing short narratives.

    For more information, visit the course website at https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/wth/www/236-001/ or contact the instructor at wth@uwm.edu.


    English 243: Introduction to Literature by Women sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Fantasy & Feminism
    Dawn Tefft
    MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm

    This course combines close reading with study of the historical and cultural contexts of works of fantastic, feminist literature authored by women. Throughout the course, students will be expected to produce analyses of literary works that draw on the specific elements comprising those works as well as on the contexts in which they were created. Some possible contexts we will be examining include the Women's Liberation Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, Industrialism, and Capitalism. Some of the tools we will use to analyze these contexts include gender theory; theories of racial, ethnic, and/or national identity; and Marxism.

    By the end of the course, students should be able to discuss fantastic literature and feminism in relation to one another; make arguments about the relative advantages and disadvantages of such broad classifications; and explain how and why specific literary texts work within, outside of, or against such classifications. The definitions of terms such as "fantasy" "magical," "magical realism," "science fiction," and "fabulism" are highly contested, and many critics have noted overlapping definitions and usages among them. The stakes of these terminological contests are high, in seeking to define what is "real," what is "unreal," and what is "differently real." The stakes are equally high for determining the meanings of "woman," "female" and "feminism." It is important to consider who is included or excluded by specific definitions, who is creating them, and who benefitting. Therefore, some of our readings and many of our discussions will focus on various definitions and usages of the concepts of "fantasy" and "feminism."

    Throughout the semester, we will read and discuss published works, write essays, and undertake creative exercises. All of these efforts are directed at helping us, as a group, come to a better understanding of how serious authors use playful means to question, upset, and potentially change conventional notions of gender.

    Course syllabus and texts (pdf 114k)


    English 245: The Life, Times, and Work of a Literary Artist sec 201 U
    Subtitle: Raymond Carver
    Sonia Khatchadourian
    Online

    Although Raymond Carver published poems and essays, it was his short stories that earned him critical acclaim as a master of the form and one of the greatest American fiction writers of the 20th century. In this course, we will focus on the short story collections that gave Carver such recognition, including but not limited to: Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? (National Book Award Nominee in 1977), What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, Cathedral (nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 1984), and selections from his last collection before his death, Where I'm Calling From. We will pay special attention to the role and importance of language in these works. Also, we may compare these modern classics to versions that Carver preferred and which demonstrate his writing style before his stories were edited for publication. Excerpts may be drawn from a recently released text, entitled Collected Stories, which has generated controversy.

    As this is an online version of the course, students will demonstrate engagement in and analysis of the readings by using the Discussion Forum feature on Desire2Learn (D2L) and by posting short writings and formal essays in the D2L Drop Box. The Content and Links sections will also be used.

    Initial reading list:

    Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? / $15.00 / ISBN: 978-0-679-73569-4
    What We Talk About When We Talk About Love / $14.00 / ISBN: 978-0-679-72305-9
    Cathedral / $15.00 / ISBN: 978-0-679-72369-1


    English 261: Introduction to Short Stories sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Contemporary International Short Fiction
    David Yost
    TR 8:00 - 9:15 am

    What is a short story and what should we do with one if we catch it? This discussion-based course will investigate how authors from Ama Ata Aidoo to Stephen King have tried to answer these questions through their innovations and triumphs with the form. Along the way, we'll discuss major literary movements of the late 20th century and the critical approaches that often accompany them. We'll also examine the craft of each author, analyzing their techniques both for our critical papers and for our own fiction-writing.

    Course assignments will include weekly responses, an analytical paper, an optional creative project, and attendance at a live reading of short fiction. For more information, contact the instructor at djyost@uwm.edu.


    English 263: Introduction to the Novel sec 001 U
    Subtitle: The Postmodern American Novel
    John Couture
    TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

    In English 263, we will examine questions of definition and periodization (what is postmodernism?), of genre (what is a novel? what is a postmodern novel?) and of nationality (what does "America" and "American literature" mean in an age of global capitalism and transnationalism?). Readings include theoretical and critical texts provided by the instructor, as well as the following novels:

    William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch / $14 / ISBN: 0-8021-4018-1
    Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 / $10 / ISBN: 0-06-184992-8
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five / $15 / ISBN: 0-385-33384-6
    Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping / $14 / ISBN: 0-312-42409-4
    Kathy Acker, Great Expectations / $16 / ISBN: 0-8021-3155-7
    Joanna Russ, The Female Man / $16 / ISBN: 0807062995
    Don DeLillo, White Noise / $16 / ISBN: 0-14-310598-1
    Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo / $15 / ISBN: 0-684-82477-9
    Gerald Vizenor, The Heirs of Columbus / $17.95 / ISBN: 0-8195-6249-1
    (Use the ISBN numbers to located used books; if bought new, the costs are as listed above.)



    English 279: Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Literature sec 201 U
    Dr. Brenda Cárdenas
    Online

    In this fully on-line course, we will analyze the key themes, styles, and trends of Chicano/Mexican American literature in the contexts of Chicano/a social and cultural history. We will explore folk ballads, myths and legends, as well as contemporary works of fiction, poetry, drama, and creative non-fiction. This will include literary works that helped launch the Chicano/a Civil Rights Movement; that narrate the daily struggles of migrant farm laborers and the border-crossing experiences of undocumented immigrants; that examine issues of gender and sexuality within Chicano/a culture; and that express variations on bi-cultural and trans-cultural identities—the betwixt and between, fusion and code-switching, acculturation and resistance to it. We will also read the works closely, analyzing the effects of various literary elements and techniques, and apply the ideas of literary and cultural critics to the primary texts. Course requirements will include weekly quizzes, discussion posts and replies, a critical research paper, and an online presentation.


    English 328: Forms of Experimental Literature sec 201 U/G
    Subtitle: Monstrous Progeny
    Dr. Stuart Moulthrop
    Online

    This class takes the idea of "experimental literature" somewhat broadly. We will work through several texts that engage unconventional or emerging media: the graphic novel Watchmen, as well as the hypertext fiction Patchwork Girl and the video games Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Watchmen: The End Is Nigh. However, we will also look at three films derived from novels, and thus will address that more familiar type of "experiment" that results from any media crossing. Media and mediation are core concerns of the course.

    Taking our cue from Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, we will focus on "monstrous progeny" – a richly evocative phrase. In Mrs. Shelley's original sense, the term refers to literary production itself: the artificial life of characters, circumstances, and stories that haunts writers and readers like a returning dream. What gives certain stories the power to spread beyond their initial telling into new contexts and forms? This movement suggests a second resonance, focused more on medium than message. Here we take human inventions, particularly media of communication, as realizations of the uncanny: simultaneously familiar and strange, alluring yet unsettling, even "monstrous." What happens to literary expression as it passes through various laboratories of cinematic illusion (from classical Hollywood to modern CGI), then into still more radical experiments like hypertext and video games? What is the relationship between literature and other media forms? How should we think, as students of literature, about the progeny (monstrous or otherwise) of subsequent invention?

    While this course is not rigorously historical, skipping from a product of the early 19th century to two from the late 20th, it does open discussion of certain threads in our cultural tapestry, particularly those monsters in our midst. Shelley's creature, Adams' various aliens-as-Englishmen, and Moore's postmodern superheroes, all offer variations on this theme. The course invites your thinking about fantasy, the gothic, and the whole notion of genre, especially as these subjects impinge on questions of mediation and re-making.

    Ultimately, though, this class will itself be something of an experiment, or a dialogue between my own thinking about these texts and your ideas and inventions. It will best succeed if you find interesting worlds to explore, in and around the assignments.

    Preliminary syllabus (doc 683k)


    English 360: The Art of Poetry sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Poets on Their Art and Craft
    Dr. Rebecca Dunham
    TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

    This course will investigate 20th century poets' interviews and essays on the craft of poetry, and consider these ideas in relation to their own original work. Our reading list will include works by Yusef Komunyakaa, Heather McHugh, Eavan Boland, and Mark Doty. Students will be graded on a presentation, a final essay/interview, reading responses, and in-class participation.


    English 383: Cinema and Genre sec 202 U/G
    Subtitle: Horror Films, 1960-1985
    Dr. Gilberto Blasini
    Online

    The course surveys the gradual transformation of horror films—mostly but not exclusively in the U.S.—from B-movie status to a popularly and critically praised genre during the 25-year period between 1960 and 1985. The release of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho in the U.S. and Michael Powell's Peeping Tom in the U.K. in 1960 marks a transition in terms of thematic, ideological and narrative approaches to conveying horror filmically. The historical changes that took place after 1960 (the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal, the women's movement, the sexual revolution, the civil rights movement, the end of the Hays Code and the appearance of the MPAA ratings system, among others) further transformed the cinematic configuration of the horror genre, giving many directors the opportunity to create socially relevant and aesthetically challenging texts that were able to engage a wide variety of audiences (e.g., the youth, African Americans). We will study a number of filmmakers who emerged as horror auteurs during these years—Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Brian de Palma, Larry Cohen, Tobe Hooper, and David Cronenberg. In addition, we will explore some of this period's horror subgenres: demonic entities/possessions, science-makes-nature-run-amok, and the slasher/stalker films. In order to understand the social relevance of these films as cultural artifacts, the course will pay close attention to these films' relationship to their historical context. Thus, we will examine how these films engage discourses related to gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationality.

    Warning: The purpose of the class is to understand the horror genre critically. If you cannot tolerate gore, violence, and profanity, or if any of the topics and issues depicted in these films go against your moral or religious beliefs, you should not take this course. There are plenty of other Film Studies courses that would be a better fit to your interests and way of life. In addition, if you are interested in horror films only from the standpoint of a fan or movie buff, this course will not fulfill your expectations. For more information, contact the instructor at gblasini@uwm.edu.


    English 416: Poetry Workshop sec 002 U
    Brenda Cárdenas
    T 2:00 - 4:40 pm

    In this course, students will engage in various in-class writing exercises, as well as drafting and revising poems outside of class. Assignments might include persona, extended-metaphor, non-literary form, ekphrastic, found/collage, and collaborative poems, as well as experiments with formal structures and constraints. Students will also read, analyze, and discuss both published contemporary poems and their peers' poems-in-progress, paying attention to what the poem aims to achieve or evoke and how the poet has constructed and crafted the poem toward this end. Finally, students will critique each other's work, offering suggestions for how their peers might alter various aspects of the poem to achieve the desired effect.


    English 417: Readings for Writers sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Procedure and Play
    Dr. Stuart Moulthrop
    R 3:30 - 6:10 pm

    Answering both to explicit structure (procedure) and ecstatic emergence (play), this class offers an introduction to born-digital electronic literature: word-based art whose operation and reception depend significantly on computational elements. We will read precursor and parallel writings (OULIPO and the L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E school), as well as critical considerations of electronic literature (Hayles, Wardrip-Fruin). We will also encounter a number of examples, both on the page (Joyce, Carpenter) and the computer screen (Electronic Literature Collection).

    There some a silent terms in the course subtitle—we could begin with poetics or poesis, implying exploration through engaged play, or writing... which will involve writing code. We will use simple resources—Hypertext Markup Language and Javascript—to tailor and create our own textual inventions. You will have the option to produce either a critical research paper or a creative project (with argument) as your final project. Final projects may be developed collaboratively.

    Preliminary syllabus (doc 155k)


    English 436: Writing for Information Technology sec 201 U/G
    Dr. Dave Clark
    Online

    This course explores theories, practices, and tools used by professional documentation specialists. Our topics will include information design, instructional documentation, and content management, among many others. While designing and producing projects, students will have the opportunity to gain both theoretical and practical experience with designing and writing tools, processes, and languages. Projects will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis and usability testing, and collaboration. This course does not assume any prior technical expertise, and students from all plans and majors are welcome.


    English 452: Shakespeare sec 001 U/G
    Dr. Mark Netzloff
    TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

    This course provides an intensive critical study of Shakespearean drama. Our discussions will concentrate on a close reading of seven plays—The Taming of the Shrew, Twelfth Night, Henry V, Titus Andronicus, Macbeth, King Lear, and The Winter's Tale—along with an analysis of the texts' literary, theatrical, and historical contexts. Because Shakespeare wrote his plays for performance rather than publication, we will pay particular attention to the cultural importance of the early modern theater. In addition, we will examine the ways these texts have been reinterpreted over time by looking at the plays in performance and on film.

    Texts for the course (you may use alternative editions instead):

    Shakespeare, Four Comedies (Bantam) [includes The Taming of the Shrew and Twelfth Night]
    ---. Four Tragedies (Bantam) [for Macbeth and King Lear]
    ---. Henry V (Bantam)
    ---. The Winter's Tale (Oxford)
    ---. Titus Andronicus (Oxford)

    A course packet will also be available at Clark Graphics that will feature the critical readings for the course (est. cost, $20). The total cost of all course materials will be between $50-60.


    English 465: Women Writers sec 002 U/G
    Subtitle: Women Writers Before Austen
    Dr. Gwynne Kennedy
    MW 9:30 - 10:45 am

    Who were some of the women who wrote and published before Jane Austen? There are in fact far too many for a single course, even within one country, so we will read a variety of writings from diverse places and centuries. They include: the first play by an English woman (Elizabeth Cary's The Tragedy of Mariam) and the first biography of a woman, written by Cary's daughters, defenses of women and women's education by Christine de Pizan in France, Sor Juana de la Cruz in Spanish Mexico, and Mary Wollstonecraft in England, sonnets by English, French, and Italian women, plays by Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn, and prose fiction by Behn and Mary Wroth (the first romance in English). The course will also track three issues through the readings: attitudes toward women's literacy and education, female sexuality, and spiritual authority, paying particular attention to how these are framed at different times and locations.


    English 501: Studies in Literature, 1500-1660 sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: English Renaissance Drama
    Dr. Mark Netzloff
    TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm

    This course provides a survey of English dramatic literature of the early modern period. As the designation early modern suggests, our discussions will emphasize the role of these texts in the formation of key literary and cultural attributes of the modern age. The public theater itself, for instance, provides the earliest example of a mass medium, a form of popular culture that addressed a spectrum of class groups and reflected on a range of political matters. And the concerns represented on the early modern stage resonate in our own time as well: from the cultural effects of an increasingly globalized world, in terms of early histories of colonialism and emerging ideas of race, to the place of gender, sexuality, and the household as cultural battlegrounds in a period of economic instability. Especially crucial to our discussions will be the literary and performance contexts of these plays, and we will examine such topics as the emergence of the professional writer and models of authorship, the effect of print culture on performance-based texts, and, most importantly, the plays themselves in performance, with screenings and clips of stage productions and film adaptations.

    We will discuss nine dramatic texts in all: Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Edward II; Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, and The Tempest; Jonson's Bartholomew Fair and The Masque of Blackness; Middleton's The Roaring Girl; and the anonymous "tabloid" play Arden of Faversham.

    Texts for the course (you may use alternative editions instead):

    Anon., Arden of Faversham (New Mermaids)
    Jonson, Bartholomew Fair (New Mermaids)
    Marlowe, Doctor Faustus and Other Plays (Oxford)
    Middleton, The Roaring Girl (Norton)
    Shakespeare, Hamlet (Bantam)
    ---. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Bantam)
    ---. The Tempest (Bantam)

    A course packet will be available at Clark Graphics that will feature Jonson's Masque of Blackness along with critical readings for the course (est. cost, $20). Including the course packet, the total cost of course materials will be approximately $75.


    English 625: Seminar in Literary History sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Eating English Lit
    Dr. Barrett Kalter
    TR 2:00 - 3:15 pm

    This seminar in literary history considers writing about food during England's "long" eighteenth century (1660-1820), an era that stretches from the opening of the first London coffeehouses to the origin of the science of gastronomy. Our aim will be to create a detailed picture of how food was produced, experienced, and imagined in this period, and to that end we will read a variety of texts: poetry and fiction, philosophical essays, medical pamphlets, economic treatises, and of course cookbooks. For example, we will situate Grainger's The Sugar Cane, a poem about the West Indian sugar industry, within the context of British colonialism and slavery, before investigating the role affordable sweetness played in the rise of consumer society and the development of theories of taste by Burke and Hume. Other topics to be discussed: British beef and the formation of a national cuisine; Shelley's vegetarianism as an aspect of his radicalism; famine and population in Swift and Malthus. Students will prepare dishes using eighteenth-century recipes in order to explore the possibilities of knowing the past through the senses. Finally, because historical thinking involves making connections between past and present, we will read recent work by chefs and food writers such as Michael Pollan, Anthony Bourdain, and Barbara Kingsolver, and reflect on how their interests are anticipated by or depart from those of the eighteenth century.

    This is a new course and editions have not yet been selected. I estimate the cost of course books, if purchased new, at around $50.


    English 633: Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Rhetoric and Everyday Life
    Dr. Alice Gillam
    M 3:30 - 6:10 pm

    If, as Kenneth Burke suggests, rhetoric is "the use of language [defined broadly to include visual and other nonverbal forms of communication] as a symbolic means of inducing cooperation [or communication] in beings that by nature respond to symbols," then rhetoric is an inescapable part of our everyday lives. Indeed, Aristotle went so far as to suggest that since everyone uses rhetoric, those who understand it can control those who do not. In short, this course introduces you to the study of rhetoric and its everyday applications. We do so by considering four general topics:

    1. What is rhetoric, and what does its study and practice entail?
    2. What are its uses in civic realm?
    3. In local community life?
    4. In the realm of popular culture?
    In the latter three units, we will focus on a particular case or cases of civic, community, and popular cultural practice.



    English 634: Seminar in English Language Studies sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Language and Gender
    Dr. Patricia Mayes
    W 3:30 - 6:10 pm

    Robin Lakoff's seminal article, "Language and Woman's Place," argued that the language women use, for example, hedges (sort of and I guess) and tag questions (It's great, isn't it?), has, in part, been responsible for excluding them from positions of power and authority. This argument claims that in essence language is a tool of oppression through which the gender norms that keep women in their place are continuously reenacted. Although many people still believe that gender consists of a set of immutable characteristics and that the way we use language merely reflects these, this course will challenge these ideas, as we examine the role of language in constructing gender identities. We will begin by examining how several feminist theories have dealt with the relationship between language and gender.

    We will also look at how various methodologies have been used to research this topic, beginning with quantitative studies in sociolinguistics and moving to the current focus on language use in communities of practice. Other questions to be explored include how gender ideologies interact with other social constructs such as culture, age, ethnicity, sexuality, and social class. Students do not need previous training in linguistics, sociology, or gender studies.

    Course description and book list (doc 80k)

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    Fall 2010

    University Online Schedule

    English 215: Introduction to English Studies sec 009 U
    Suchismita Banerjee
    TR 3:30 - 4:45 pm

    This course is a writing-intensive introduction to multiple forms and contexts of literary and nonliterary texts and discourses in English, in a cultural, historical, and global framework.


    English 263: Introduction to the Novel sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Contemporary American Novels
    David Yost
    TR 8:00-9:15 am

    What does it mean to be an "American"? Is it merely a question of one's passport, or something more? In this course, we'll discuss at how eight major novelists—including Kurt Vonnegut, Toni Morrison, Junot Díaz, Marilynne Robinson, and Cormac McCarthy—have approached this question, as well as those of patriotism, pacificism, love, sex, religion, and race.

    In addition to our studies of individual authors, student presentations will introduce classmates to key vocabulary and critical approaches of the field, laying a foundation for final papers and future coursework. Other assignments will include a critical analysis paper (or optional creative project) and a final research paper.


    English 278: Introduction to World Literatures in English sec 001 U
    Subtitle: War, Violence and Women in the Middle East
    Dalia Gomaa
    MW 12:30-1:45 pm

    We will read texts written in Israel, Lebanon, Palestine, Egypt, Algeria and Morocco that have been translated in English. The focus will be on issues of war and violence and the stereotypical representation of the Middle East especially representations of women in that part of the world. We will start with a geographical and a historical background about the countries that are referred to as "Middle East" in order to question and, perhaps, critique the term or try a new way of understanding and thinking of it.


    English 306: Survey of Irish Literature sec 001 U
    Professor José Lanters
    TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm

    Irish literature is as rich and varied as the country's history. "Irishness," however, is not an innate quality, but a cultural and political construct that is constantly re-"invented." Beginning with the earliest extant poems and legends (translated from the Irish), and moving via the Anglo-Irish period of the eighteenth and nineteenth century and the Irish Literary Revival of the early twentieth century to a more urban and cosmopolitan contemporary perspective, this course offers an introduction to Irish writing and an exploration of several varieties of "Irishness" as they are expressed through the literature.

    Students will be assessed on three papers and a final exam.


    English 361: The Development of Poetry sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Four Modernist Poets
    Professor Jason Puskar
    TR 9:30-10:45 am

    This course is an intensive introduction to the works of four modernist poets, each representing a very different kind of modernist poetry, and all most active between roughly 1910 and 1960: Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, Wallace Stevens, and Muriel Rukeyser. The course will combine intensive close reading of individual poems with a more general consideration of historical and cultural issues related to each poet.

    These include Hughes' participation in the "Harlem Renaissance," Rukeyser's involvement with leftist politics, Frost's adaptations of traditional poetic forms, and Stevens' debts to several key philosophers. The course also will train students in the fundamentals of poetic composition, including versification, meter, and common figures of poetic speech. By the end of the semester, students will have gained skills and techniques for reading all poetry, a fuller sense of the development of modernist poetics in the first half of the twentieth century, and detailed knowledge of four influential writers.


    English 404: Language, Power and Identity sec 001 U/G
    Professor Patricia Mayes
    W 3:30-6:10 pm

    This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.


    English 414: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 002 U/G
    Subtitle: Texts for Performance
    Professor Brenda Cárdenas
    W 11:00 am-1:40 pm

    In this course, we will compose texts intended for live performance, such as spoken word/performance poems (including collaborative, voice-choreographed pieces), dramatic monologues, image theater pieces, one-act plays, and experimental performance art works. To achieve this purpose, we will complete various in-class writing and improvisation (including movement and voice) exercises, as well as read, view, and listen to sample pieces by professional performance poets/artists. We will also draft and revise scripts and scores as assignments and bring them to class to be critiqued by our classmates who will offer suggestions for how we might best craft our pieces to achieve the desired effect. Although no previous experience is required, you will be expected to present your pieces to the class.


    English 430: Advanced Writing Workshop sec 001, 002, 003 U
    Carol Ross
    TR 9:30-10:45 am, 11:00 am-12:15 pm, 12:30-1:45 pm

    English 430 is a small, 15-member advanced composition workshop, designed for already capable writers who have done considerable writing in the past and who want to further develop their prose style. Its focus is literary/creative nonfiction--that is, writing in which the content is based on experience and observed or researched facts (nonfiction) and the style is creative (literary/narrative). How writers say something will be as important as what they say. Students will have the opportunity to read and write narratives in different genres of literary nonfiction: memoir, memoir about another person, nature and culture.

    Students are expected to have very good control already of grammar and mechanics since these are the basics of writing.

    These sections are intended for juniors, seniors, and university special students and do not carry graduate credit.


    English 442: Writing Center Tutoring Practicum sec 001 U/G 1 unit
    Margaret Mika

    This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.

    Students may enroll only with instructor's permission and must be advanced undergraduate (junior or senior) or graduate students who have successfully completed the Writing Center application process and been hired as prospective Writing Center tutors.

    In this course, students will:

    • prepare for 4-hours/week (minimum) tutoring practice in UWM's Writing Center
    • be introduced to theoretical and practical basics of tutoring in a writing center
    • be introduced to the professional community of writing centers including the policies and practices of the International Writing Center Association (IWCA)
    • have the opportunity to self-assess and reflect on their tutoring and writing skills

    In many ways, learning to tutor well is a baptism-by-fire enterprise requiring many hours of on-the-job practice. This course provides Writing Center tutors with a foundation of concentrated study and supervised practice from which to begin. Therefore, the first approximately two-thirds of class hours will be frontloaded, i.e., held before the semester starts and the Writing Center opens. We meet for 9 hours over 2 days during the week prior to the first day of classes and again for 1.5 hours one Friday each month to complete the course requirements. Just as important as these formal class meetings will be the many day to day opportunities for tutors to talk with the director, the graduate assistant coordinator and fellow tutors once the Center opens the 3rd week of the semester and tutoring services begin.


    English 504: Studies in Literature, 1660-1800 sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: The Enlightenment Novel
    Professor Barrett Kalter
    MW 2:00-3:15 pm

    The novel originates in the eighteenth century, the "age of enlightenment." How can we understand the simultaneous and mutually-informing development of these two crucial components of modernity? In this course, we will read major works of eighteenth-century British fiction in light of the key concepts of enlightenment philosophy: reason, progress, individualism, and equality. Our aim will be two-fold: to explore how these concepts were illustrated, promoted, and contested in novels, and to understand the particular features of the novel that made the form an especially effective vehicle for enlightenment thought. We will also want to discuss the value of enlightenment principles and their bearing on our own time. Should we now strive for what the eighteenth century called enlightenment?

    Novels to be read: Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Swift, Gulliver's Travels; Johnson, Rasselas; Sterne, A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy; Austen, Pride and Prejudice.

    Philosophers to be read: Bacon (on empirical knowledge); Locke (on liberty, slavery, and property); Hume (on reason and emotion); Smith (on sympathy); Wollstonecraft (on gender and equality); Kant (on critique).


    English 514: Literature in Context sec 003 U
    Subtitle: Horror Fiction
    Professor Barrett Kalter
    M 4:30-7:10 pm

    Why do we get pleasure from reading what scares us? What frightened people in the past? Do novels that aim to frighten deserve the same cultural prestige as "serious" literature, or is horror fiction inferior because it encourages us to feel rather than think? These are the questions that will frame our discussion of five great works of horror fiction that will lead us from the eighteenth century to the present.

    We will begin with Matthew Lewis's The Monk, a story of religious persecution and black magic, and one of the first novels to be labeled—and scorned—by critics as "horror" fiction. We will refine our understanding of this category by reading a novel by Ann Radcliffe, who rejected Lewis's graphic and perverse style in favor of more psychological, suspenseful narratives that were thought to exemplify the quite different, more artistic principles of "terror" fiction. We will then read two classic horror novels, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, works that use the supernatural to figure anxieties about technology, class, and sexuality. We will end with John Linquist's Let the Right One In, a gruesome novel about a young vampire, recently adapted in a film that we will watch as well.


    English 616: Advanced Workshop in Poetry sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Structures and Constraints
    Professor Brenda Cárdenas
    R 3:30-6:10 pm

    In this capstone workshop, we will explore the effects that various forms (from traditional to experimental) and constraints, including self-imposed limits, have on our poems and our writing processes. We will pay particular attention to how such structures and procedures might serve to make our poems more imaginative, musical, economical, and nuanced. To this end, we will write in formal verse (syllabics, sonnets, villanelles, pantoums, Sapphic stanzas, and the like), as well as experiment with constraints in such Oulipo and aleatory forms as lipograms, palindromes, anagrams, and those of our own invention. To accomplish this, we will read a variety of published texts, complete in-class writing exercises, draft and revise poems outside of class, and bring poems to class to be critiqued by our classmates who will offer suggestions for how we might best craft our poems to achieve the desired effect.


    English 622: Seminar in Irish Literature sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Drama from Yeats to McDonagh
    Professor José Lanters
    T 3:30-6:10 pm

    In the early years of the Irish Revival period at the beginning of the twentieth century, the Abbey Theatre produced great playwrights like J.M. Synge and Sean O'Casey, but by mid-century, a variety of cultural and political forced had conspired to remove most of the excitement from Irish drama. In the 1960s, as the cultural and political climate began to change, younger playwrights like Brian Friel and Tom Murphy moved Irish theatre out of the doldrums with works that were emotionally complex, theatrically engaging, and thematically relevant to what was happening in Irish society.

    Beginning with the "grand old men" of the Abbey Theatre, this course will explore a number of the most successful, challenging, and, at times, controversial playwrights who followed in their wake. In addition to discussing the relationship between form and content of the plays, and paying attention to aspects of their production in the theatre, we will place them in their cultural, historical and critical context with the aid of supplementary reading materials in a course packet.

    Students will be assessed on two papers, a class presentation and class participation.


    English 626: Seminar in Critical Theory sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Affect and Media in Theory and Fiction
    Professor Richard Grusin
    M 12:30-3:10 pm

    This seminar takes up two modes of theoretical investigation of current interest, Affect Theory and Media Theory. The syllabus pairs works of affect and media theory with three important contemporary novels: we will read Walter Benjamin's "Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" and Marshall McLuhan's The Medium is the Massage with Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49; Raymond Williams' Television and Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulations with Don DeLillo's White Noise; and Brian Massumi's Parables for the Virtual and my own Premediation with William Gibson's Pattern Recognition. Students will be expected to write three papers, one on each of the three pairings of theory and fiction.


    English 627: Seminar in Literature and Culture sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: The Suburban Imagination
    Professor Jason Puskar
    TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm

    More Americans live in the suburbs than in the country and the city combined, but suburban novels often have been overshadowed by their urban and rural cousins. Not here. This course studies American fiction about the suburbs from the 1870s to the present, with emphasis on the period following World War II. We will pay special attention to the history of the suburbs as built environments, to the emergence of suburban culture, and to ongoing debates about the merits and demerits of suburban living. The course includes material drawn from urban planning, architecture, television sitcoms, sociology, critical theory, and recent histories of suburbia and sprawl. Literary authors include Sinclair Lewis, John Cheever, Gloria Naylor, and A.M. Homes. Our goal will be to understand how suburbia has shaped American fiction, but also how American fiction has shaped various conceptions of suburbia.

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    Summer 2010

    University Online Schedule

    English 404: Language, Power and Identity sec 051 U/G
    Professor Patricia Mayes
    6/28-7/24
    MTWR 1:00-3:30 pm

    This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the relationship between language and society. In investigating this relationship, we will consider how language is involved in the construction of social identity and power structures. Our investigation of social identity will include not only examining how individuals construct their identities but also how language is implicated in the formation of social groupings such as class, ethnicity, gender, and regional affiliations. The approach taken in this course is both descriptive and critical in that we will examine how language is implicated in creating and maintaining power for certain groups through such constructs as standard dialects and more broadly through public policies.

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    Spring 2010

    University Online Schedule

    English 205: Business Writing U

    Business Writing is an introductory course designed to help students develop and refine their writing skills. In this class, students' writing skills will be "fine tuned," and students will communicate more effectively in a business environment. The three main goals for Business Writing are as follows:

    • Develop workplace writing based on knowing your purpose and understanding your audience
    • Acquaint you with workplace writing situations and tasks related to audiences you will communicate with in a business/working environment
    • Introduce you to the most appropriate writing styles for different work-related situations that you may encounter

    In this course, students can expect to plan, compose, and edit their own writing; evaluate written communication, their own and the writing of others; and connect oral presentation skills with writing skills. Three sections of English 205 (sections 201, 202 and 203) will be offered online.


    English 206: Technical Writing sec 201 (online) U
    Christopher Lyons

    Technical Writing prepares students to be effective communicators, particularly effective writers, in their professions. Students will develop workplace writing skills and apply the technical and rhetorical principles that are the foundation of workplace writing. The course will introduce students to some of the basic issues, elements, and genres of technical writing:

    • Writing for various audiences and purposes
    • Addressing social issues related to writing, such as ethics and gender
    • Defining, analyzing, and attempting to resolve workplace writing problems
    • Conducting primary and secondary research for writing
    • Writing collaboratively
    • Developing an effective professional tone and style
    • Incorporating effective visual elements into document design
    • Writing various technical documents (e.g., descriptions, proposals, instructions, and reports)


    English 207: Health Science Writing sec 001 U
    Nancy Walczyk
    MW 9:30-10:45 am

    Health Science Writing is taught under the rubric of Business and Technical Writing. It is taken by students enrolled in pre-medicine, pre-pharmacy, nursing, occupational therapy, speech, and related health fields. The goal of the course is to teach students how to communicate clearly and effectively and to prevent misunderstandings that can interfere with good client or patient care.

    This writing course is designed for students from a variety of health science disciplines; for that reason it does not focus on writing tasks or formats particular to any one medical specialty. Students will gain practice in applying general business and technical writing principles to the health field. Assignments may include writing letters to clients, instructions, policy and procedures statements, internal memos, reports, patient information brochures, a literature review on an ethical issue, and one argumentative research paper on a current health issue. Most business assignments use the case approach, which means that students are given a scenario and a persona and are asked to write a document appropriate to the situation. Prerequisite: Completion of the English composition requirement (a passing score on the English Essay Exam or a grade of C or better in English 112).


    English 209: Language in the United States sec 201 (online) U
    Professor Patricia Mayes

    Have you ever wondered how many varieties of American English there are? (Why use good morning, why not w's up?) Have you ever wondered why we have different varieties of speech, or why it's easy to tell a speaker from the south from a midwesterner? Is there really a standard spoken language, or are language standards only for writing? How do people perceive the different varieties and accents of American English, and what do people in other parts of the country think about the Wisconsin accent? (Is it really just about cheeseheads and bubblers?) What is the role of other languages in our changing multicultural society? And what do our ways of speaking say about our identities? (Are ya a Yooper, eh?)

    We'll explore these and other questions in English 209. We'll also investigate the future of our language: What's the likely effect of new forms of technology and global communication? We'll use short readings, discussion boards, and web sites like "Do You Speak American?" to look at these and other important issues affecting our evolving American speech patterns. y dont u sign ^ 2day!

    English 209 satisfies Humanities GER credit and is a requirement for "Plan D" English majors. Note that this is an online course. You must have access to a computer and be able to access D2L to take this course.


    English 233: Introduction to Creative Writing sec 011 U
    Craig Medvecky
    TR 2:00-3:15 pm

    An introduction to the writing of poetry and fiction.


    English 234: Writing Fiction sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Structure and Technique
    Dave Yost
    MW 11:00 am-12:15 pm

    In this class, we will examine, discuss, and experiment with key techniques of the fiction writer's craft, including the following:

    • selecting evocative, concrete details to represent and replace abstractions
    • creating and maintaining suspense
    • shaping intriguing yet believable characters
    • creating persuasive, sensory-based settings
    • writing "clean," uncluttered prose

    To help guide our discussions, we will study the craft of contemporary authors from around the world as possible models for our own work. In addition, we will look at alternatives to the traditional short story form, including micro/flash fictions, prose poems, metafictions, visual narratives, and hypertext. The bulk of our time, however, will be spent workshopping new fiction produced by students for the course.

    Students will also have the option of attending readings to make connections in Milwaukee's local fiction community, and the opportunity to discuss strategies and venues for publication of their work. No previous experience with creative writing is required, and students from all majors are welcome.


    English 236: Special Topics in Creative Writing sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Revising the Past: fictionalizing history & memory
    Ann Stewart
    MW 9:30-10:45 am

    This is a fiction/nonfiction fusion course in which students will be retelling and revising "true" events in history and/or in their own lives. Ultimately, students will be producing fiction, but the class seeks to examine the intersections between truth and fiction and the ways in which they work with and against each other. In some ways, this is a course that teaches the art of lying, but the intent is to interrogate the distinction between what is deemed "fact" or "truth" and what makes a good story.


    English 240: Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Writing (about) Comics
    Andy Buchenot
    MW 2:00-3:15 pm

    Writing (about) Comics builds on recent scholarship in English studies that argues students should learn:

    • how to interpret visual compositions and
    • how to compose visually.

    To this end, this course asks students to analyze comics rhetorically and put their observation into practice by making their own comics. We will be writing, drawing, revising, discussing, and workshopping student comics. Although the course does require students to engage in visual production, it does not require students to be accomplished visual artists. In other words, you do not need to be able to draw to do well in this course.

    In addition to student works, we will be reading texts from Jessica Abel, Kevin Huizenga, David Mazzucchelli, Scott McCloud, Chris Ware, and comics practioners. Readings will also include works from comics theorists like Will Eisner, Thierry Groensteen, Charles Hatfield, and Pascal Lefevre.

    This course also asks students to write about their experiences interpreting and composing visually. These written assignments offer students valuable opportunities to articulate ways of understanding "the visual" and its increasing importance in contemporary textual production.

    This course offers excellent opportunities for students from across the university including--but not limited to--English, art, communications and education majors. In sum, Writing (about) Comics encourage students to think about comics as a form of composing and not only as texts fit for examination.


    English 245: The Life, Times, and Work of a Literary Artist sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Flannery O'Connor
    John Couture
    MW 9:30-10:45 am

    In English 245, we will read and examine Flannery O'Connor's works in their cultural, historical, and biographical contexts.

    Readings include O'Connor's fiction (novels and short stories), essays and occasional prose, letters, and selected criticism on her work.

    Themes we will pursue in the course include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • religion (Christianity--both Catholicism and Protestantism)
    • region and regionalism (the American South)
    • race
    • gender
    • class


    English 247: Literature and Human Experience sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Hypertexts and Interactive Fiction
    Cara Ogburn
    MW 11:00 am-12:15 pm

    This class will explore the uses of interactivity in print and electronic texts--from Choose-Your-Own-Adventure novels to hypertext fiction and poetry. Although hypertext and electronic literature are able to use the affordances of the digital medium to do so more obviously, many different texts have asked their readers to make decisions in the reading process that affect the reading experience and, in turn, change the text to be multiple. We will read a variety of these texts in order to consider what the uses and limitations of this genre might be.

    Possible readings include:

    • Mark Danielewski, House of Leaves
    • William Gibson, Agrippa: a book of the dead
    • Shelley Jackson, Patchwork Girl
    • Michael Joyce, afternoon
    • Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire
    • Stephanie Strickland, slippingglimpse

    And more!


    English 277: Introduction to Ethnic Minority Literature sec 001 U
    Subtitle: Southeast Asian American Literature and Life Stories
    Professor Mary Louise Buley-Meissner
    TR 12:30-1:45 pm

    Extraordinary stories often are told by ordinary people: stories of courage, sacrifice, strength, and hope. As we read life stories by and about Southeast Asian Americans, we can better understand the histories, sorrows, and dreams of people who have come to this country from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos to build new lives. Through our study of autobiography, family biography, and contemporary writing, we will learn how political forces intersect with personal circumstances in shaping individual identities, family bonds, and enduring community values.

    Central to our work together will be learning how such tragic events as the Vietnam War and the Cambodia Holocaust have affected entire generations. For example, what inner resources do people draw on as they struggle to survive (physically, mentally, spiritually) during times of war and political turmoil? On what basis can identity and integrity be strengthened as people face the challenge of rebuilding their lives after war? When refugees from Laos have settled in the United States, why has it been difficult to bridge differences between traditional Hmong and modern American views regarding the interrelationship of self, family and society?

    As we investigate such questions, we also will consider the ethical issues involved in understanding and responding to human suffering. Films and documentaries (including Heaven and Earth and The Killing Fields) will provide background for our discussions. Overall, through our work together, we will see how life stories offer new views of the past, important questions about the present, and valuable lessons for shaping the future of our multicultural country.


    English 366: Non-Fiction Prose sec 001 U
    Subtitle: The (Not So) New Journalism
    Professor Valerie Laken
    MW 2:00-3:15 pm

    In 1973, Tom Wolfe declared that a new style of journalism, eschewing the dry voice and rigid formulas of standard reporting, had stepped out of the shadows of the great American novel and become "literature's main event." Journalists like Joan Didion, Truman Capote, and Hunter S. Thompson went beyond the bare bones of "who, what, where, when, why" reporting and adopted the tactics of fiction writers to involve themselves and their readers in their stories.

    In this course we'll study the work of several prominent New Journalists and trace the effects of their work on journalism and literature. We'll discuss some of their potential antecedents, from Addison and Steele to Mark Twain to Lillian Ross, to determine whether their journalism was, in fact, all that "new." Finally, we'll study the work of some New New Journalists, such as Jon Krakauer, Susan Orlean, and Eric Schlosser, and examine the ways in which New Journalism has evolved and gained prominence in the decades since Wolfe championed it.


    English 416: Poetry Workshop sec 001 U
    Professor Brenda Cárdenas
    MW 9:30-10:45 am

    In this course, students will engage in various in-class writing exercises, as well as drafting and revising poems outside of class. Assignments might include persona, extended-metaphor, non-literary form, ekphrastic, found/collage, and collaborative poems, as well as experiments with formal structures and constraints. Students will also read, analyze, and discuss both published contemporary poems and their peers' poems-in-progress, paying attention to what the poem aims to achieve or evoke and how the poet has constructed and crafted the poem toward this end. Finally, students will critique each other's work, offering suggestions for how their peers might alter various aspects of the poem to achieve the desired effect.


    English 425: Advanced Business Writing sec 201 (online) U
    Professor Rachel Spilka

    This special distance education section of English 425 is an advanced level course in business writing designed to build upon students' current writing skills and prepare them for more complex challenges of writing effectively to resolve problems in business contexts. This course will focus on conducting workplace research, analyzing workplace contexts and problems, choosing effective writing strategies, and creating highly readable documents that succeed in both informing and convincing target audiences. Special focus will be placed on writing for a wide variety of business audiences, including international readers. This course will also improve students' skills in collaboration, negotiation, project planning and management, time management, and other strategies important to working with a team toward the successful completion of a workplace document.


    English 430: Advanced Writing Workshop sec 001, 002, 003 U
    Carol Ross
    TR 9:30-10:45 am, 11:00 am-12:15 pm, 12:30-1:45 pm

    English 430 is a small, 15-member advanced composition workshop, designed for already capable writers who have done considerable writing in the past and who want to further develop their prose style. Its focus is literary/creative nonfiction--that is, writing in which the content is based on experience and observed or researched facts (nonfiction) and the style is creative (literary/narrative). How writers say something will be as important as what they say. Students will have the opportunity to read and write narratives in different genres of literary nonfiction: memoir, memoir about another person, nature, and culture.

    Students are expected to have very good control already of grammar and mechanics since these are the basics of writing.

    These sections are intended for juniors, seniors, and university special students and do not carry graduate credit.


    English 431: Non-Fiction Book Publishing sec 001 U
    Leslie Whitaker
    MW 2:00-3:15 pm

    Students will gain an insider's perspective into the quirky business of book publishing, from idea generation to proposal writing to marketing the finished product. Students will work on developing a draft of a book proposal and sample chapter on a subject of their choice over the course of the semester.

    Course readings will include relevant articles, a book about book publishing, and one bestseller. (Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.)


    English 434: Editing and Publishing sec 001 U
    Carolyn Washburne
    W 4:30-7:10 pm

    In this course, students will learn the essentials of targeting copy for specific audiences, preparing manuscripts for publication (including content editing, copy editing, and proofreading), the production process, the business aspects of publishing, and the fundamentals of layout and design. Although the course emphasizes general audience magazines and books, other types of publications are also covered, including academic, professional, and trade publications. The assignments are as follows:

    • Editor's column
    • Line editing of magazine manuscripts
    • Analyzing and writing headlines
    • Repurposing an article for a different audience
    • Evaluating book proposals
    • Report on the production process of a local publishing concern
    • Final group project: Publication of a newsletter, magazine, or other publication


    English 436: Writing for Information Society sec 001 (online) U/G
    Professor Dave Clark

    This course explores theories, practices, and tools used by professional documentation specialists. Our topics will include knowledge management, information architecture, information design, and of course instructional writing. While designing and producing individual and group projects, students will have the opportunity to gain both theoretical and practical experience with designing and writing tools, processes, and languages. Projects will also require learning effective strategies for managing writing projects, audience analysis and usability testing, and collaboration. This course does not assume any prior technical expertise, and students from all plans and majors are welcome.


    English 442: Writing Center Tutoring Practicum sec 001 U/G
    Margaret Mika

    This course is designed to prepare peer tutors to work one on one with writers who visit the UWM Writing Center. We will begin to examine writing and tutoring processes on theoretical and practical levels. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, strategies for talking with writers at different stages of the process, different genres of academic and personal writing, cultural perspectives in writing and English as a Second Language issues.

    In many ways, learning to tutor well is a baptism-by-fire enterprise requiring hours of on-the-job practice. This course provides Writing Center tutors with a foundation of concentrated study and supervised practice from which to begin. Therefore, the first two-thirds of class will be frontloaded, i.e., conducted before the semester starts and 3 weeks before the Writing Center opens. We will meet for 10 hours over two days during the week prior to the first day of classes and again for 1.5 hrs, one Friday each month to complete the course requirements. As important as these formal classes will be the many day to day opportunities for tutors to talk with the director, the graduate assistant coordinator and fellow tutors once the Center opens.

    Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required to enroll. Students must have attained junior status, successfully completed the Writing Center application process and hired as a prospective Writing Center tutor. All majors, especially non-English, are welcome.


    English 443: Grant Writing sec 001 U/G
    Sally Stanton
    T 5:30-8:10 pm

    Do you want to help nonprofit organizations serve the public? Grant writing combines richly descriptive storytelling and subtle persuasion within technical limits established by potential charitable funders of these organizations. The practical skill of preparing clear, concise grant proposals is valued and desired by employers in higher education, engineering, science and medicine, human services, the arts, and cultural institutions.

    In this class, students will learn the basics of researching and writing effective, persuasive grants, and will then develop and apply that knowledge in a writing internship with a community-based nonprofit organization. They will learn how to find and research the sources of charitable funding information available to Milwaukee area organizations and how to effectively organize and present that information for writing grants. Representatives of charitable foundations, professional grant writers, and others will share their knowledge of the nonprofit-funding world and successful grant writing. Students will leave this course with marketable skills and a greater knowledge of the ways in which effective communication adds value to the workplace.


    English 444: Technical Editing sec 001 (online) U/G
    Professor Rachel Spilka

    This course is a hands-on practicum in which students are responsible for both individual and collaborative editing projects. Students learn that in work contexts, the scope of editing tasks can vary dramatically: In some cases, editors "fix up" minor grammatical and usage errors (copyediting); in other cases, editors question, "re-envision," and then reshape major aspects of a document such as its purposes, target audiences, content, style, organization, and design (comprehensive editing). The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to handle both copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks -- and to edit both hard copy and electronic documents -- in future work contexts. A secondary emphasis is on helping students better understand the roles and responsibilities of editors, the ethical dimensions of editing, how editors contribute to document effectiveness, how editors relate to writers during a document's life cycle, and what is involved in becoming a successful editor.

    Weekly course assignments are likely to include discussion forum posts on ethical issues and the editor-writer relationship, in addition to "mini assignments" aimed at developing skills and practice in copyediting; relearning (or learning for the first time) the fundamentals of English grammar, spelling, mechanics and usage; and gaining competence in proofreading and editing technical material. Major editing assignments are likely to include copyediting and comprehensive editing tasks on actual work documents in a variety of content areas (such as public policy, science, and health/medicine). A final collaborative course project will involve working in a team to conduct a comprehensive edit on an actual organization's document, website, or set of documents.


    English 449: Internship in English sec 001, 002, 003, 004 (depending on credits taken) U/G
    Carolyn Washburne
    M 4:30-7:10 pm (initial meeting only; course does not meet regularly)

    This flexible-credit internship for English majors (and selected non-majors) provides students with the opportunity to:

    • Apply their coursework and writing skills while working in a "real world" setting
    • Develop professional skills and experience that are valuable in the marketplace
    • Synthesize course and work experience through progress reports, class discussion, conferences with the instructor, and a final paper

    Internship placements have been arranged with a variety of Milwaukee-area organizations and businesses in the following fields: publishing, public relations/advertising/corporate communications not-for-profit agencies, and technical writing firms/departments (see the URL below for more information on placements). As a writing intern, a student may be called upon to do a variety of tasks, including writing, editing, proofreading, and research.

    To enroll in this course, students must fill out an application form, which is available at http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/English/bustech/internship/. The application asks for a summary of their school and work experience, references, and a sample of their writing. A faculty committee will screen applicants for their competency in English grammar, punctuation, and usage, as well as for their ability to conduct themselves appropriately in the workplace.


    English 504: Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Sex and Enlightenment
    Professor Barrett Kalter
    TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm

    The Enlightenment is commonly understood as a philosophical movement that affirms society's progressive discovery of universal moral principles and nature's laws through the public use of critical reason. Sexuality, by contrast, is often seen as a private facet of identity that emanates in unruly ways from the body and its passions. This course will explore the relation between these contradictory categories as represented in eighteenth-century literature, considering: 1) modern notions of sexuality as products of Enlightenment thought; 2) the challenges sex poses to Enlightenment values of self-control, equality, free expression, normalcy, and consent.

    Our discussion will center on the following: the bawdy poetry of the Earl of Rochester and The Libertine, a film of his life starring Johnny Depp; Eliza Haywood's Love in Excess, an early bestseller rivaled in popularity only by Robinson Crusoe; John Cleland's pornographic Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure; and Matthew Lewis's The Monk, a Gothic tale of religious prohibition, transgressive desire, and revolution. We will also read selections from works by Enlightenment intellectuals, including the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and the Marquis de Sade, as well as recent theorists, such as Michel Foucault and Laura Kipnis.

    Topics to be discussed include: libertinism as instance of and resistance to political tyranny; romantic love, intimacy, and private life; pornography, censorship, and freedom of expression; prostitution, urban sexual subcultures (e.g., the proto-homosexual mollies), and the legal and medical definition of deviance.


    English 616: Advanced Workshop in Poetry sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Structures and Constraints
    Professor Brenda Cárdenas
    W 12:00-2:40 pm

    In this workshop, we will explore the effects that various constraints, such as meter, refrain, sound patterns, and self-imposed limits and obstructions have on our poems and our writing processes. We will pay particular attention to how such structures and procedures might serve to make our poems more imaginative, musical, economical, and nuanced. To this end, we will write in formal verse (sonnets, villanelles, pantoums, Sapphic stanzas, and the like), as well as experiment with restrictions in such forms as lipograms, syllabics, palindromes, acrostics, and anagrams, as well as those of our own invention. To accomplish this, we will read and listen to a variety of published texts, complete in-class writing exercises, draft and revise poems outside of class, and bring poems to class to be discussed and critiqued by our classmates.


    English 624: Seminar in Modern Literature U/G
    Subtitle: Dangerous Fictions
    Professor Jason Puskar

    This research seminar studies modern American fiction's interest in risk and danger, often in novels thought to be dangerous themselves. From violent crime to modern warfare, industrial accidents to infectious disease, American novels have a history of seeking out danger, and many of the books that did so were condemned and sometimes banned.

    We will study works by Richard Wright, Nella Larsen, James Cain, and Don DeLillo, as well as Orson Welles's original 1938 radio broadcast of "The War of the Worlds." We will pay special attention to the cultural history of certain kinds of dangers, including crime, natural disasters, and riots. We also will read these novels in relation to recent theories of risk and danger from a variety of disciplines, ranging from anthropology to philosophy.

    Some questions to be asked: Is fiction more or less dangerous because it is "not true"? How does American culture construct risks and dangers through language? How can we understand the relationship of literature to modern institutions of risk analysis and risk management? This course requires students to complete a guided research project.


    English 625: Seminar in Literary History U/G
    Subtitle: Carribean Literary History
    Professor Kevin Browne


    English 628: Seminar in Literature by Women U/G
    Subtitle: Captivity, Seduction and Domesticity
    Professor Kristie Hamilton


    English 629: Seminar in Literature and Sexuality sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Contemporary LGBT Literature
    Professor Barrett Kalter
    TR 3:30-4:45 pm

    In recent years, authors have tried to fill gaps in the historical record by imagining the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people in periods when such lives were routinely kept secret, ignored, and destroyed. Critics of this act of imaginative reclamation question the relevance of modern identities to earlier periods, and wonder if a past isn't being so much restored as created anew, as fiction with no counterpart in fact. In this course, we will read some of the most gorgeously written, thematically ambitious, and sexy works of literature to address these issues, works that satisfy the desire for a queer past while troubling the assumptions about authenticity and knowability that stir that desire.

    Readings may include: C.P. Cavafy, Collected Poems, in Daniel Mendelsohn's acclaimed new translation; Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex; Colm Toibin, The Master; Sarah Waters, Affinity; Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry.


    English 633: Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing sec 001 U/G
    Subtitle: Rhetoric and Everyday Life
    Professor Alice Gillam
    MW 12:30-1:45 pm

    This course introduces students to rhetorical theory and its many everyday practices, including its use in civil discourse, popular culture, and community life. Defined as the ways in which signs influence people, rhetoric permeates every aspect of our daily lives; thus, its study not only offers a framework for critically interpreting the many discourses that we encounter daily but also strategies for participating and intervening in those discourses.

    We will begin our study with an overview of rhetoric theory and then turn to texts that focus on particular practices such as Barry Brummett's Rhetoric in Popular Culture, Ralph Cintron's Angel's Town: Chero Ways, Gang Life, and Rhetorics of the Everyday, and Sharon Crowley's Toward a Civil Discourse. In addition to our readings, students will analyze the rhetoric of various kinds of "everyday" texts as well as compose their own rhetorical performances.


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