Barry CameronBarry Cameron

Associate Professor

340 Lapham Hall
(414) 229-3136
bcameron@uwm.edu
Vita (pdf-82kb)

Degrees:
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University
M.S., Dalhousie University
B.S., Dalhousie University

Key Areas of Interest: Igneous Petrology, Volcanology, Terroir

Teaching Areas: Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology, Volcanology, Advanced Igneous Petrology, Terroir, Freshman Seminar (Why Do Volcanoes Erupt?)

Research Interests: My main fields of research are igneous petrology, volcanology, and terroir. At the mo- ment, I am focused on four main broad research projects: the origin of arc magmas, the explosive behavior of silicic lava domes, the formation of subglacial volcanoes, and the unique terroir of volcanic soils.

Selected Publications:

B.R. Edwards, I.P. Skilling, B.I. Cameron, C. Haynes, J.G.D. Hungerford, and A. Lloyd, 2008, Evolution of an englacial ridge: Pillow Ridge tindar, Mount Edziza volcanic complex, NCVP, British Columbia, Canada, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

J.A. Stevenson, J.L. Smellie, D.W. McGarvie, J.S. Gilbert, and B.I. Cameron, 2008, Subglacial intermediate volcanism at Kerlingarfjöll, Iceland: magma-water interactions beneath thick ice, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

J.A. Walker, J.E. Mickelson, R.B. Thomas, L.C. Patino, B.I. Cameron, M.J. Carr, M.D. Feigenson, and R.L. Edwards, 2007, U-series disequilibria in Guatemalan lavas, crustal contamination, and implications for magma genesis along the Central American subduction zone, Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 112, 16 p.

B.I. Cameron and J.A. Walker, 2006, Diverse volcanism in southeastern Guatemala: the role of crustal contamination,/em>, GSA Special Paper 412 – Volcanic Hazards in Central America, p. 121-139.

J.A. Walker, S. Templeton and B.I. Cameron, 2006, The chemistry of spring waters and fumarolic gases encircling Santa María volcano, Guatemala: insights into the hydrothermal system below an active arc volcano, GSA Special Paper 412 – Volcanic Hazards in Central America, p. 59-83.

Current Research

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