Graduate Students

Name Office Phone Email Advisor

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Jane Block

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
blockja@uwm.edu Dyanna Czeck

Thesis Research:
I am currently studying the deformational history of Archean gneiss domes in northern Ontario, Canada. These domes are some of the oldest units in the Rainy Lake area (30 km east of International Falls, MN) and date to approximately 2.7 Ga. Little is known about how these competent gneiss bodies were emplaced and how they reacted to the transpressional regime they were subjected to during the Kenoran Orogeny. This study will utilize field mapping techniques to gather information on their deformation and, if possible, their emplacement. Orientations of structures such as tension gashes, quartz veins, shear zones, foliations and lineations will be collected and used in a detailed kinematic analysis to determine the deformational history of these units.

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Nicole Braun

LAP 334
414-229-4794
nlbraun@uwm.edu  

Thesis Research:

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Harris Byers

LAP 330
414-229-2772 hlbyers@uwm.edu Tim Grundl

Thesis Research:

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Justin Calhoun

LAP 331
414-229-3609 jcalhoun@uwm.edu Dyanna Czeck

Thesis Research:

I am investigating the relationship of magmatism and tectonism in the Moine Thrust Belt region in the Scottish Highlands. Recent radiometric ages have resolved dating issues for granitic intrusions in the area. However, less understood is the relationship between the Moine Thrust and the emplacement of the intrusions. My research aims to determine if these intrusions were emplaced pre-, post-, or syntectonically. Anisotropic magnetic susceptibility paired with petrographic microstructural analysis of the granite plutons will be conducted to explain the kinematics associated with the pluton emplacement.

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George "Kit" Carson

LAP 242
414-229-6463 glcarson@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

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Ashley Dineen

LAP 332
414-229-3952 aadineen@uwm.edu John Isbell

Margaret Fraiser

Thesis Research:

I study global Lower and Middle Triassic paleoecology, with my main research goal being to further resolve the spatial and temporal nature of ecosystem recovery following the end-Permian mass extinction in localities such as south China, northern Italy, and the western United States. Evidence suggests that ecological devastation following the end-Permian mass extinction may have lasted 5 million years into the Middle Triassic (Anisian). Previous work has based biotic recovery on generic and species diversity, the reappearance of reefs, and broad global datasets. However, community recovery is based on more than these parameters and can vary in time and space. For this project, I have established a working definition of community recovery that not only includes high diversity and abundance, but also high evenness and tiering. The establishment of biotic community structure in terms of more than just abundance and diversity will allow, for the first time, an enhanced view of the transition from the depauperate Lower Triassic to the proposed fully-recovered Middle Triassic. PhD Advisor: Dr. Margaret Fraiser

Alice Egan

Alice Egan

LAP 332
414-229-3952 amegan@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

I am working with Dr. Shangping Xu. I am looking at the structure of historical precipitation records (number of storms, time between storms) for Wisconsin to see if that affects recharge of aquifers.

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Nick Fedorchuk

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
fedorch@uwm.edu Stephen Dornbos

Thesis Research:

Lucia Feriancikova

Lucia Feriancikova

LAP 226
414-229-1153 lucia@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

My research focus on better understanding the transport and fate of bacteria in unsaturated porous media. Particularly, I will examine the influence of the pore water chemistry and soil moisture content on the transport of bacteria.

The other area of my research is to examine the transport of plasmid DNA, its adsorption and desorption on surface of sand particles under saturated condition.

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Teri Gerard

LAP 334 414-229-4794 tlgerard@uwm.edu Barry Cameron

Thesis Research:

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Jack Graham

LAP 349
--- jpgraham@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Steven Greenwood

LAP 330
414-229-2772 greenw23@uwm.edu Barry Cameron

Lindsay McHenry

Thesis Research:

I am fascinated with the "weird rocks" of the world, i.e. those that tend to be silica-undersaturated and/or are associated with intrusions of mantle origin. I am working with Dr. Lindsay McHenry, with a research locality in the volcanic highlands of Tanzania. While much of the alkalic activity attributed to such volcanoes as the carbonatitic Ol Doinyo Lengai has been known for several decades, other volcanoes in the Crater Highlands are less understood. The material they erupted during the Pliocene and Pleistocene resulted in ash layers that were deposited in archeologically significant Olduvai Gorge and surrounding areas. I hope to relate tephra and ashes that were deposited in Olduvai to that of the extinct volcanoes Embakai, Oldeani, Sadiman, and Lemagrut, to name a few. My ultimate goals within the field are to focus on large scale carbonatitic and alkaline igneous petrology, with possible looks into extraterrestrial bodies.

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Bill Jacobson

--- --- wrjjr@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

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Jenny Johanson

LAP 226
414-229-1153 johanso2@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

I am looking into differences in transport of bacteria in the groundwater.  Bigeochemical interactions between bacteria and sand grains result in differences in how much bacteria adsorbs to the sand, resulting in differences in groundwater transport.  My reasearch has included laboratory column studies of transport of E. coli, Enterococcus faecium, and Bacteriodes in sand.

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Na-Hyun Jung

LAP 332
414-229- 3952
njung@uwm.edu
Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:


Sofie-Charlotte Lappe

LAP 240
414-229- 3328
lappe@uwm.edu Julie Bowles

Thesis Research:

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Snejana Karakis

LAP 339
414-229- 3136
karakis@uwm.edu Barry Cameron

Thesis Research:

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Jonah Novek

LAP 334
414-229-4794
jnovek@uwm.edu  

Thesis Research:

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Katie Pauls

LAP 332
414-229-3952
kpauls@uwm.edu  

Thesis Research:
My research focuses on a high-latitude shelf edge to slope fauna from the Tepuel-Genoa Basin in Chubut Province in Patagonia, Argentina in order to better understand the responses of a high-latitude fauna to changing environmental conditions, and to develop a more robust understanding of climate change and its impacts on the biosphere during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA). I work with Dr. Margaret Fraiser and Dr. John Isbell to recreate the paleocommunities as well as the varying depositional environments in the Pampa de Tepuel Formation in the Tepuel Basin. Most of the known LPIA marine faunal data come from low-latitudinal regions, and have been used as a global proxy. However, modern organisms in the tropics and polar regions respond differently to changing climate, and the same can be proposed for paleocommunities during the LPIA. The Tepuel Basin contains a nearly-continuous depositional history during the LPIA, and holds the potential to provide in-depth insight into the collapse of the LPIA. The changes and adaptations of the biota can also serve as a proxy for understanding future trends in Earth’s climate system. By continuing research on the LPIA, we may be better able to understand the fundamental factors of species and ecosystem instability because of the substantial environmental and climatic shifts that occurred.

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Andrew Parisi

LAP 330
414-229-2772 aparisi@uwm.edu Dyanna Czeck

Thesis Research:

I will be working with Dyanna Czeck on a series of outcrops in the Quetico Subrovenience of Ontario, just North of Minnesota. I will be looking at deformed veins within the metamorphosed rocks. Due to the orientation of the veins, some were compressed while others were extended during deformation. I will be applying a method devised by Yvette Kuiper at Colorado School of mines in which the vein orientation and deformation, when plotted on a stereonet, will reveal the stresses on the area during an orogeny over one billion years ago. I will then compare the results of the new method with previous results.

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Tom Pedersen

LAP 334
414-229-4794 peders49@uwm.edu

Thesis Research:

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Jenna Rolle

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
jjrolle@uwm.edu Margaret Fraiser

Thesis Research:
I study Early Triassic paleoecology, focusing specifically on the recovery of echinoids in the western United States following the end-Permian mass extinction. Early Triassic marine environments were characterized by oceanic warming due in part to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 and periodic intervals of localized anoxia, resulting in an overall restructuring of faunal dominance, distribution, and biodiversity. My field investigations in the western U.S. have revealed that echinoids thrived within storm dominated, shallow marine shelves on the eastern margin of Panthalassa despite their deleterious surroundings. Thus, by using echinoids as a proxy, the environmental conditions required for sustaining diverse and well-established paleocommunities given the harsh marine conditions of the Early Triassic may become more apparent.

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Ellie Stapleton

LAP 226
414-229- ers@uwm.edu; Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

I am working on looking at changes in the paleoenvironment during the Permian-Triassic. More specifically, how the fluvial styles and stacking patterns change at different localities in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica.

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Sarah Survis

LAP 332
414-229-3952 srsurvis@uwm.edu John Isbell

Thesis Research:

I am working on looking at changes in the paleoenvironment during the Permian-Triassic. More specifically, how the fluvial styles and stacking patterns change at different localities in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica.

Ernie Thalhamer

Ernie Thalhamer

LAP 242
414-229-6463 thalham2@uwm.edu Dyanna Czeck

Thesis Research:

My research involves the study of anatomizing shear zone networks, in the Rainy Lake region of Canada. The importance of anatomizing shear zone networks lies in the fact that their geometries have been called upon in the control of strain accommodation. Although the importance of the network geometries is well known, the ability to quantify these networks leads to problems. I will be studying multiple shear zone network outcrops within a single gabbroic sill, the Grassy Portage intrusion. In the field, foliation measurements of the networks will be taken at sub-cm scale, through the use of a real-time kinematic GPS, and imported into Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Here I will conduct network analysis on the networks, to quantify their geometry. I will also attempt to use kriging to statistically interpolate the likely geometry of the networks in areas which are otherwise inaccessible.

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Anna Thorp

LAP 347
---- dlugole3@uwm.edu Tim Grundl

Thesis Research:

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Zach Watson

LAP 332
414-229-3952 ztwatson@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:
My research focuses on natural analogues to carbon sequestration sites, specifically geyser-type leakage through wellbores. Abandoned oil exploration wells geyser due to the exsolution of CO2 from brine causing a positive feedback and subsequent eruptions. The magnitude of leakage through wellbores that geyser is the greatest compared to other types such as diffusive fault parallel leakage. I have made estimations to the fluid velocity, eruption initiation depth and the annual emission of CO2. My future work will focus on further understanding of the mechanisms which drive these geysers and to pinpoint why they act the way they do. My field sites are in Utah, New Mexico and a cold, dark lab in Lapham Hall.

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Erin Wimer

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
wagner45@uwm.edu Margaret Fraiser

Thesis Research:

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Elizabeth Woodford

LAP 371
--- woodfor5@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research: