Graduate Students

Name Office Phone Email Advisor

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Mark Borucki
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 281
414-229-4794
mborucki@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

I am working on better defining absolute age dates for the various glacial advances/retreats in SE Wisconsin. My focus is on ice-walled lake plains (IWLP) where I hope to obtain organic matter from these former glacial lakes that I may use for C14 age date analysis. Sediments/organic matter that were deposited in the ice-walled lakes represent the period when glacial ice was ebbing. As such, climate was changing during the formation of these lakes. Therefore, I hope to integrate climate information obtained from ice core samples and other proxies to better understand climatic changes that were occurring when the IWLPs formed.

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Nicole Braun
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-4794
nlbraun@uwm.edu Margaret Fraiser

Thesis Research:

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Harris Byers
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 330
414-229-2772 hlbyers@uwm.edu Tim Grundl

Thesis Research:

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George "Kit" Carson
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-4794 glcarson@uwm.edu Lindsay McHenry

Thesis Research:

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Ashley Dineen
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 332
414-229-3952 aadineen@uwm.edu Margaret Fraiser

Thesis Research:

I study global Lower and Middle Triassic paleoecology, with my main research goal being to further resolve the spatial and temporal nature of ecosystem recovery following the end-Permian mass extinction in localities such as south China, northern Italy, and the western United States. Evidence suggests that ecological devastation following the end-Permian mass extinction may have lasted 5 million years into the Middle Triassic (Anisian). Previous work has based biotic recovery on generic and species diversity, the reappearance of reefs, and broad global datasets. However, community recovery is based on more than these parameters and can vary in time and space. For this project, I have established a working definition of community recovery that not only includes high diversity and abundance, but also high evenness and tiering. The establishment of biotic community structure in terms of more than just abundance and diversity will allow, for the first time, an enhanced view of the transition from the depauperate Lower Triassic to the proposed fully-recovered Middle Triassic. PhD Advisor: Dr. Margaret Fraiser

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Nick Fedorchuk
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
fedorch@uwm.edu John Isbell

Thesis Research:

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Teri Gerard
(Ph.D student)

LAP 334 414-229-4794 tlgerard@uwm.edu Lindsay McHenry

Thesis Research:


Devin Gerzich
(MS student)

LAP 330
414-229-2772 dgerzich@uwm.edu Julie Bowles

Thesis Research:

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Jack Graham
(MS student)

LAP 349
--- jpgraham@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Ethan Guyant
(MS student)

LAP 331
414-229-3609 emguyant@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Kyungdoe Han
(MS student)

LAP 331
--- kyungdoe@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Elizabeth Ives
(MS student)

LAP 371
--- woodfor5@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

My research utilizes anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabrics of subglacial tills to infer subglacial sediment kinematics. Specifically, I am studying the formation of flutes. Flutes are superficial, subglacial, elongate landforms whose long-axes are parallel to glacier flow. They are no more than 1 m high, but can be anywhere from 5 - 1000 m long, and are generally composed of till. Understanding how the till is placed and deformed during the formation of flutes could give some insight in to subglacial ice-till interactions. Since deformation of underlying sediment can by a major component of glacier motion in soft-bedded glaciers (such as the Pleistocene Ice Sheets in North America, and modern day Ice Sheets in Greenland and Antarctica), understanding how the glacier and its basal sediments interact is an integral component modeling glacier behavior in the present, past and future. For my project, I am measuring and analyzing AMS fabrics for several flutes from the forefields of Múlajökull glacier, central Iceland, and Breiðamerkurjökull glacier in south-eastern Iceland.

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Bill Jacobson
(Ph.D. student)

--- --- wrjjr@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

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Jenny Johanson
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 226
414-229-1153 johanso2@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

I am looking into differences in transport of bacteria in the groundwater.  Bigeochemical interactions between bacteria and sand grains result in differences in how much bacteria adsorbs to the sand, resulting in differences in groundwater transport.  My research has included laboratory column studies of transport of E. coli, Enterococcus faecium, and Bacteriodes in sand.

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Na-Hyun Jung
(MS student)

LAP 332
414-229- 3952
njung@uwm.edu
Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Snejana Karakis
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 339
414-229- 3136
karakis@uwm.edu Barry Cameron

Thesis Research:
My research field of interest is Terroir, which can be defined as the unique set of characteristics of a place imparting its essence to the grapevines cultivated and the wine produced in that place. These characteristics include the vineyard soils, bedrock, geomorphology, slope, orientation, and climate of a place, as well as human factors, such as viticultural and vinification practices. My studies will entail an analysis of the geological factors that contribute to the individual character of a wine and the variability among wines.

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Levi Moxness
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-1153 lmoxness@uwm.edu John Isbell

Erik Gulbranson

Thesis Research:

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Jonah Novek
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-4794
jnovek@uwm.edu Stephen Dornbos

Thesis Research:

I am analyzing the geochemistry, specifically paleoredox levels, of early Cambrian shales from western Nevada. I am looking to see if there is a correlation between levels of bioturbation and oxygenation at the sediment-water interface at this time in Earth's history.


Ken Oanes
(MS student)

LAP 330
414-229-1153 kwoanes@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

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Fatimah Abuduwufu
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 330
414-229-1153 apatiman@uwm.edu Julie Bowles

Thesis Research:
I am currently working on the volcanic glassy materials; my research mainly focus on the paleomagnetic intensity records and its relationship to the material property changes in volcanic glasses over the geological time. Currently I am working on Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada samples and Big Glass Mountain Glass, California samples to better understand the rock magnetic (physical) and geochemical properties as well as the paleointensity variation.

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Katie Pauls
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 332
414-229-3952
kpauls@uwm.edu Erik Gulbranson

John Isbell

Thesis Research:
My research focuses on a high-latitude shelf edge to slope fauna from the Tepuel-Genoa Basin in Chubut Province in Patagonia, Argentina in order to better understand the responses of a high-latitude fauna to changing environmental conditions, and to develop a more robust understanding of climate change and its impacts on the biosphere during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA). I work with Dr. Margaret Fraiser and Dr. John Isbell to recreate the paleocommunities as well as the varying depositional environments in the Pampa de Tepuel Formation in the Tepuel Basin. Most of the known LPIA marine faunal data come from low-latitudinal regions, and have been used as a global proxy. However, modern organisms in the tropics and polar regions respond differently to changing climate, and the same can be proposed for paleocommunities during the LPIA. The Tepuel Basin contains a nearly-continuous depositional history during the LPIA, and holds the potential to provide in-depth insight into the collapse of the LPIA. The changes and adaptations of the biota can also serve as a proxy for understanding future trends in Earth’s climate system. By continuing research on the LPIA, we may be better able to understand the fundamental factors of species and ecosystem instability because of the substantial environmental and climatic shifts that occurred.

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Kurtis Quamme
(MS student)

LAP 330
414-229-1153 kjquamme@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

My research involves the filtration efficiency of biofilters seeded with biofilms from the Milwaukee Drinking Water Treatment Plant and point of use household scale biofilms sampled from the batey region of the Dominican Republic. This research seeks to build correlations in microbial community structure and pathogen adsorption in biofilter systems under variable water chemistry and pretreatment conditions in order to optimize adsorption for the treatment of drinking water.

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Sarah Survis
(MS student)

LAP 332
414-229-3952 srsurvis@uwm.edu John Isbell

Thesis Research:

I am working on looking at changes in the paleoenvironment during the Permian-Triassic. More specifically, how the fluvial styles and stacking patterns change at different localities in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica.

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Jenny Ulbricht
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-4794 jbu@uwm.edu John Isbell

Thesis Research:

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Zach Watson
(MS student)

LAP 332
414-229-3952 ztwatson@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:
My research focuses on natural analogues to carbon sequestration sites, specifically geyser-type leakage through wellbores. Abandoned oil exploration wells geyser due to the exsolution of CO2 from brine causing a positive feedback and subsequent eruptions. The magnitude of leakage through wellbores that geyser is the greatest compared to other types such as diffusive fault parallel leakage. I have made estimations to the fluid velocity, eruption initiation depth and the annual emission of CO2. My future work will focus on further understanding of the mechanisms which drive these geysers and to pinpoint why they act the way they do. My field sites are in Utah, New Mexico and a cold, dark lab in Lapham Hall.

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Erin Wimer
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
wagner45@uwm.edu Margaret Fraiser

Thesis Research: