Graduate Students

Name Office Phone Email Advisor

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Mark Borucki
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 281
414-229-4794
mborucki@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

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Harris Byers
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 330
414-229-2772 hlbyers@uwm.edu Tim Grundl

Thesis Research:

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Nick Fedorchuk
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 334
414-229- 4794
fedorch2@uwm.edu John Isbell

Thesis Research:


Devin Gerzich
(MS student)

LAP 330
414-229-2772 dgerzich@uwm.edu Julie Bowles

Thesis Research:

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Jack Graham
(MS student)

LAP 349
--- jpgraham@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Ethan Guyant
(MS student)

LAP 331
414-229-3609 emguyant@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Kyungdoe Han
(MS student)

LAP 331
--- kyungdoe@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

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Bill Jacobson
(Ph.D. student)

--- --- wrjjr@uwm.edu Tom Hooyer

Thesis Research:

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Jenny Johanson
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 226
414-229-1153 johanso2@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

I am looking into differences in transport of bacteria in the groundwater.  Bigeochemical interactions between bacteria and sand grains result in differences in how much bacteria adsorbs to the sand, resulting in differences in groundwater transport.  My research has included laboratory column studies of transport of E. coli, Enterococcus faecium, and Bacteriodes in sand.

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Emily Joynt
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-4794 ekjoynt@uwm.edu Weon Shik Han

Thesis Research:

 

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Snejana Karakis
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 339
414-229- 3136
karakis@uwm.edu Barry Cameron

Thesis Research:
My research field of interest is Terroir, which can be defined as the unique set of characteristics of a place imparting its essence to the grapevines cultivated and the wine produced in that place. These characteristics include the vineyard soils, bedrock, geomorphology, slope, orientation, and climate of a place, as well as human factors, such as viticultural and vinification practices. My studies will entail an analysis of the geological factors that contribute to the individual character of a wine and the variability among wines.

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Levi Moxness
(MS student)

LAP 332
414-229-3952 lmoxness@uwm.edu John Isbell

Erik Gulbranson

Thesis Research:


Ken Oanes
(MS student)

LAP 330
414-229-1153 kwoanes@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

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Fatimah Abuduwufu
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 330
414-229-1153 apatiman@uwm.edu Julie Bowles

Thesis Research:
I am currently working on the volcanic glassy materials; my research mainly focus on the paleomagnetic intensity records and its relationship to the material property changes in volcanic glasses over the geological time. Currently I am working on Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada samples and Big Glass Mountain Glass, California samples to better understand the rock magnetic (physical) and geochemical properties as well as the paleointensity variation.

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Katie Pauls
(Ph.D. student)

LAP 332
414-229-3952
kpauls@uwm.edu Erik Gulbranson

John Isbell

Thesis Research:
My research focuses on a high-latitude shelf edge to slope fauna from the Tepuel-Genoa Basin in Chubut Province in Patagonia, Argentina in order to better understand the responses of a high-latitude fauna to changing environmental conditions, and to develop a more robust understanding of climate change and its impacts on the biosphere during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA). I work with Dr. Margaret Fraiser and Dr. John Isbell to recreate the paleocommunities as well as the varying depositional environments in the Pampa de Tepuel Formation in the Tepuel Basin. Most of the known LPIA marine faunal data come from low-latitudinal regions, and have been used as a global proxy. However, modern organisms in the tropics and polar regions respond differently to changing climate, and the same can be proposed for paleocommunities during the LPIA. The Tepuel Basin contains a nearly-continuous depositional history during the LPIA, and holds the potential to provide in-depth insight into the collapse of the LPIA. The changes and adaptations of the biota can also serve as a proxy for understanding future trends in Earth’s climate system. By continuing research on the LPIA, we may be better able to understand the fundamental factors of species and ecosystem instability because of the substantial environmental and climatic shifts that occurred.

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Kurtis Quamme
(MS student)

LAP 330
414-229-1153 kjquamme@uwm.edu Shangping Xu

Thesis Research:

My research involves the filtration efficiency of biofilters seeded with biofilms from the Milwaukee Drinking Water Treatment Plant and point of use household scale biofilms sampled from the batey region of the Dominican Republic. This research seeks to build correlations in microbial community structure and pathogen adsorption in biofilter systems under variable water chemistry and pretreatment conditions in order to optimize adsorption for the treatment of drinking water.

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Jenny Ulbricht
(MS student)

LAP 334
414-229-4794 jbu@uwm.edu John Isbell

Thesis Research: