MALLT Graduate Admissions

Graduate School Admissions

Graduate School Bulletin: General Information
Graduate School Admissions Process
Apply On-Line
Graduate School Publications & Forms
International Admissions

 

How to Apply to MALLT

In addition to completing the application procedures required by the Graduate School listed above, the MALLT program requires applicants to send to the MALLT Program Office:


1. Three letters of recommendation, to be sent to the MALLT Coordinator, not the Graduate School. All letters should be accompanied with a Letter of Recommendation Form. Please ask the persons writing a recommendation for you to use institutional stationery or other appropriate official letterhead. At least two of the letters should come from former instructors who can speak to your ability to do graduate work.

 

2. Reasons Statement: an essential part of your application, the Reasons Statement is used to determine the appropriateness of your educational and professional goals and serves as an example of your ability to express yourself in writing. In the statement:
  • Explain your reasons for pursuing graduate study.
  • Describe specific interests and your background in the field.
  • List any relevant skills or training you have acquired.
  • List relevant academic awards or honors you have received.
  • List the names of those individuals who will write on your behalf.

Applicants intending to complete a concentration in Translation need to pass the Translation Program Qualifying Exam before they can be admitted to the program. The exam is offered in May, August, and December. Applicants should plan ahead to ensure that the exam is taken on a timely basis so as not to delay the processing of their application.

 

Please note that the MALLT program does not require GREs for admission.

Application Deadlines

MALLT accepts applications for Fall and Spring entry. All application materials should be received by:

  • December 15 for admission in the following fall term;
  • September 15 for admission in the following spring term

Application materials may be submitted after this date, but late submission will delay the completion of your application file. Late applications can adversely affect your chances of Teaching Assistantship support.

Your application will be processed as soon as all required materials have been received.

If you are a resident of the state of Wisconsin and apply too late for a given semester, you may take up to four courses as a "Non-Degree Graduate Student," and then transfer those credits toward the degree after being admitted to the program. Students considering this option should consult with the MALLT Coordinator.

Admission Requirements

  • Undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university
  • GPA of 2.75 or higher
  • International students must have a TOEFL iBT score of 83 or higher; English proficiency requirements vary by concentration
  • Knowledge of a language other than English; admissions criteria vary by concentration

Language Concentrations - an undergraduate major in the language, or comparable background, such as coursework, a significant immersion experience, or demonstrated very high level of proficiency combined with appropriate academic training. Applicants may also be asked to provide a representative writing sample--a short upper-level analytical paper written in the language of their concentration. The writing sample should be no less than 3 pages in length; it may be a paper that was written for an upper-level undergraduate course in language, literature, or related field.

Translation Concentration on the Translation Program Qualifying Exam

Comparative Literature concentration - an undergraduate major in comparative literature, including advanced study of a language other than English, or equivalent literary and language preparation.

Linguistics Concentration - an undergraduate major in linguistics or in a related field, such as English, a foreign language, psychology, philosophy, or anthropology; and basic-level familiarity with a language other than English, which may be demonstrated by coursework, immersion experience, or native fluency.