MALLT Courses

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MALLT Courses

Fall 2012 Core Seminars

MALLT 704: Seminar in Cultural Studies
Jian Xu; Thursday, 5:30pm-8:10pm

The World that Literature Makes

What is the world that literature makes? There is of course the fictional world an author creates in his work, which may or may not resemble the “real” world we live in. There is the “real” world itself, the world we know “out there” through our own experiences, mediated however through a regime of knowledge made up of history, philosophy, anthropology, religion, law, art, and the sciences, etc., of which literature plays an indispensable part. There is then the world as in “world literature,” which is a network of signs created by all the literary cultures of the globe, linking diverse, discrete instances of our being-in-the-world into a universal category of experience. Far from being separated, these worlds are mutually formative: one depends and impacts on another. But how does the world created by, say, Kafka in Metamorphosis, make the world we actually live in, or for that matter, open a world beyond the national borders? We’ll study how the narrative activity of “doing things with words” becomes an act of world-making through a system of interlinked ideas, symbols, and beliefs in the public realm and turns into a world-making force capable of forming and altering identities, selves, worldviews, beliefs, consensus…, and enabling us to know, build, contest, reform, or imagine anew the world we live in. Since our culturally situated perspective limits our views of the world, we’ll also ask in what ways literature can help us be open to the singularity of the others’ truth? The literary processes of world formation are imbricated in power relations too. In what ways then can literary world-making resist transnational capitalism’s claim to universality? These and many other crucial issues are the object of our inquiry. Besides critical essays, literary works, we’ll also include some films and artworks as our texts.

 

We'll read such authors as Umberto Eco, Lubomir Dolezel, Nelson Goodman, Richard Rorty, Franco Moretti, and Neil Lazarus, coupled with a host of short stories, poems, artworks, and a few films.

MALLT 708: Proseminar in Linguistics
Hamid Ouali; Monday, 5:00pm-7:40pm
Presents a range of linguistic constructs, demonstrating through readings, problems, and exercises how these concepts can be used in the analysis of language.

Other Fall 2012 courses

MALLT 700: Language Teaching Methods
Kathleen Farrell Whitworth; Monday/Wednesday, 2:00pm-3:15pm
Introduction to practical issues of language instruction for new teaching assistants and language teachers; explores some theoretical issues related to second- and foreign language learning.

Spring 2012 Core Seminars

MALLT 707: Seminar in Methods of Literary Analysis
Peter Paik; Wednesday, 6:00pm-8:40pm
Reading After the End of Theory

How do we read texts?

How do works of literature, film, and new media relate to the history of ideas and to sociopolitical conditions? What kinds of theoretical approaches remain most promising and meaningful today, when some leading scholars have declared that theory has become exhausted, while others seek to ground humanistic study in the concerns of ecology or technology? This seminar will provide a survey of literary and cultural theory, as well as examine recent trends and developments, such as neoliberalism, cyberculture, and environmentalism. Readings for the course may include theoretical and critical texts by Jean Baudrillard, Ursula Heise, Fredric Jameson, Gayatri Spivak, Michael Tratner, Simon Gikandi, David Harvey, John Gray, and Terry Eagleton. We will also read the fiction of Franz Kafka, Amitav Ghosh and may view the films Children of Men (UK, USA, 2006) and the Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (Thailand, 2010).
MALLT 709: Seminar in Literary and Cultural Translation
Lorena Terando/Chantal Wright; Online
This course is a study and practice of literary translation in its cultural setting. Students will engage in a discussion of essays, analysis of published translations, translation practice, and collegial discussion of students' work.

Fall 2011 Core Seminars

MALLT 703: Seminar in Language and Communication: Youth Culture -Transnational Identities and Language in Global World
Bozena Tieszen; Wednesday, 5:30pm-8:10pm
A goal of this course is to explore linguistic means that young people use to identify themselves as members of a transnational world community. In this course students will analyze creative ways of communication via digital media, specifically how and to what degree English has changed in order to serve as a means of linguistic interaction. We will analyze what has been referred as ‘netspeak’ an English-based speech variety that is used in chat rooms, blogs, instant messaging and on-line games by people from all over the world. We will also examine linguistic effects on English by Japanese anime and manga culture, the influence of American culture on other languages; German, French, Swedish, Polish, Japanese, Korean, Chinese among others. In this course students will have the opportunity to determine whether “global youth culture” is a real, tangible and definable phenomenon. If that is the case, what are the features or identity markers, both linguistic and cultural, of global youth? What characteristics can be attributed to transnational or national identities?
MALLT 708: Proseminar in Linguistics
Carolyn Zafra; Thursday, 4:30pm-7:10pm
Presents a range of linguistic constructs, demonstrating through readings, problems, and exercises how these concepts can be used in the analysis of language.
MALLT 740: Approaches to the Modern I: Backgrounds of Modernism
Mark Netzloff; Monday, 4:30pm-7:10pm
In contrast to an earlier generation of criticism that often conflated “modernity” and “modernism,” this seminar offers a more capacious approach to the historical trajectories and cultural foundations of “the modern.” As we survey some of the most influential statements in the fields of political philosophy, intellectual history, and critical theory, we will not focus on a particular period or cultural context but instead analyze modernity as a mode of historical consciousness and political reflection. Our approach to the modern will therefore emphasize the ways that the history of the present is constituted through an engaged revision of the past and critique of earlier theoretical traditions.
Our discussions will be structured around a series of interconnected, transhistorical keywords: the state, the public, the nation, and apprehensions of time. We will approach these topics by juxtaposing critical work from distinct historical and cultural contexts: among other examples, we will look at appropriations of Machiavelli by Gramsci, Althusser, and Negri; the legacies of Spinoza in recent theoretical work on affect, the emotions, and politics; and Hobbes as a point of reference in later models of sovereignty from Schmitt to Agamben.
Our readings will traverse conventional distinctions of period and discipline, with texts from the early modern period (Bodin, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Spinoza), the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (Hegel, Kant, Locke, Marx, Rousseau, Weber), the early twentieth century (Arendt, Benjamin, Gramsci, Schmitt), and late twentieth and twenty first centuries, with particular emphasis on critical work from the past decade (Agamben, Badiou, Balibar, Benhabib, Butler, Deleuze, Derrida, Foucault, Habermas, Laclau, Latour, Mouffe, Nancy, Negri, Poulantzas, Rancière, Serres, and Spivak, among others).
Our seminar will meet one week as part of a symposium that I am organizing on the topic of “States of Early Modernity,” which will be held at the Newberry Library, Chicago, in October. Students will also have the opportunity to expand their final projects and participate in a seminar that I will be running in Boston in April 2012, a project that will later culminate in an essay collection.
Finally, a more practical reminder that this course fulfills requirements for a pre-1800 seminar for Literary Studies students, and also serves as a core course for the Modern Studies tracks in English and History as well as for the MALLT program in Comparative Literature.
Please feel free to contact the instructor (netzloff@uwm.edu) if you have any questions regarding the course.

Other Fall 2011 courses

MALLT 700: Language Teaching Methods
Kathleen Farrell Whitworth; Monday/Wednesday, 2:00pm-3:15pm
Introduction to practical issues of language instruction for new teaching assistants and language teachers; explores some theoretical issues related to second- and foreign language learning.

MALLT Core Seminars

The following is a list of MALLT core seminar courses:

MALLT 702: Seminar in Literary Forms
Study of specific forms and genres (narrative, epic, lyric, dramatic, etc) stressing the effects of compositional patterns and expressive modes on the representation of content. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites announced in schedule of classes each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max.
MALLT 703: Seminar in Language and Communication
Survey of basic theories on the nature of language and of the modes of verbal communication, with emphasis on the socio-cultural aspects.
MALLT 704: Seminar in Cultural Studies
Investigation of cultural phenomena in their socio-historical contexts and in their symbolization in folklore, literature, and art. Specific topics and any additional prereqs announced in the Schedule of Classes each time course is offered. CompLit 704 & MALLT 704 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max.
MALLT 706: Seminar in Foreign Language Methodology and Pedagogy
Nature and direction of recent developments in foreign language methodology and instructional principles.
MALLT 707 (701): Seminar in Methods of Literary Analysis
Two or more theoretical and methodological approaches to literature, with application to selected literary texts. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites announced in Schedule of Classes each time course is offered. CompLit 707 & MALLT 707(701) are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max.
MALLT 708: Proseminar in Linguistics
Presents a range of linguistic constructs, demonstrating through readings, problems, and exercises how these concepts can be used in the analysis of language. Linguis 708(701) & MALLT 708 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another.
MALLT 709: Seminar in Literary and Cultural Translation
Study and practice of literary translation in its cultural setting. Discussion of essays, analysis of published translations, translation practice, and collegial discussion of students' work. MALLT 709 & Trnsltn 709 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another.
MALLT 740: Approaches to the Modern I
Seminar on the major figures and intellectual forces that have shaped multiple approaches to the modern across the academy. English 740, Hist 740, & MALLT 740 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another.
MALLT 741: Approaches to the Modern II
Seminar on major figures and intellectual forces that have shaped approaches to the modern across periods. English 741, Hist 741 & MALLT 741 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another.

Interdisciplinary/Interdepartmental courses are taught singly or jointly by resident or visiting faculty members. These courses are more specifically focused than the core seminars, offering students the possibility of concentrated work in a particular area of interest or in the comparative approach.

Teaching Assistants in foreign language courses are required to take MALLT 700: Language Teaching Methods in their first semester. This course provides an introduction to practical issues of language instruction for new teaching assistants and language teachers, and explores some of the theoretical issues related to second- and foreign language learning.