Thomas HolbrookThomas M. Holbrook

Wilder Crane Professor of Government and Chairperson

Office: Bolton, Room 640
Phone: (414) 229-6468
e-mail: holbroot@uwm.edu
Curriculum Vitae: pdf

Degrees:

Ph.D., University of Iowa
B.A., University of Iowa

Research Interests:

Political Behavior, Campaigns and Elections, State Politics, Research Methods

Courses Taught:

PolSci 390: Political Data Analysis - Online (pdf)
PolSci 473: Public Opinion - Syllabus (pdf)

Current Projects:

Several papers on the civic function of presidential campaigns

Selected Publications:

Do Campaigns Matter? 1996 Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

"Cognitive Style and Political Learning During the 2000 Presidential Campaign." (2006) Political Research Quarterly (forthcoming, September).

"Presidential Campaigns and Political Mobilization." (2005) American Journal of Political Science 49:689-703 (With Scott McClurg).

"Sources of Error in Statewide Presidential Trial-Heat Polls." (2003) Political Research Quarterly 56:431-40 (With Jay DeSart).

"State-wide Trial-Heat Polls and the 2000 Presidential Election: A Forecasting Model." (2003) Social Science Quarterly 84:561-73 (With Jay DeSart).

"Presidential Campaigns and the Knowledge Gap."(2002) Political Communication 19:437-54.

"Did the Whistle Stop Campaign Matter?" (2002) PS: Political Science and Politics 35:59-66.

"Electoral Competition, Legislative Balance, and State Welfare Policy." (2002) American Journal of Political Science 46:415-27. (With Charles Barrilleaux and Laura Langer).

"Knowing Versus Caring: the Role of Affect and Cognition in Political Perceptions" (2001) Political Psychology 22:27-44 (with Kathleen Dolan)

"Political Learning During Presidential Debates" (1999) Political Behavior 21:67-89.

"Campaigns, National Conditions, and American Presidential Elections." (1994) American Journal of Political Science 38:973-989.

"Electoral Competition in the American States." (1993) American Political Science Review 87:955-62 (with Emily Van Dunk).

"Presidential Elections in Space and Time." (1991) American Journal of Political Science 35:91-109.