Natasha Borges Sugiyama

Natasha Borges Sugiyama

Associate Professor

Office: Bolton, Room 622
Phone: (414) 229-6641
e-mail: sugiyamn@uwm.edu
Curriculum Vitae: pdf

Degrees:

Ph. D., University of Texas at Austin
M.P. Aff., University of Texas at Austin
B.A., Oberlin College

Courses Taught:

PolSci 246: U.S. - Latin American Foreign Relations, Syllabus (pdf)
PolSci 325: Latin American Politics, Syllabus (pdf)
PolSci 368: Gender & Politics in Developing Nations, Syllabus (pdf)
PolSci 499: Poverty and Politics: U.S. and Comparative Perspectives, Syllabus (pdf)
PolSci 952: The Politics of Developing Nations, Syllabus (pdf)
PolSci 976: Comparative Public Policy, Syllabus (pdf)

Research Interests:

Brazilian Politics, Policy Diffusion, Social Sector Reform, Comparative Public Policy, and Gender and Politics.

Selected Publications:

Book

Sugiyama, Natasha Borges. Diffusion of Good Government: Social Sector Reforms in Brazil. (South Bend: University of Notre Dame Press, November 2012).

Journal Articles

Sugiyama, Natasha Borges, and Wendy Hunter. “Whither Clientelism? Good Governance and Brazil’s Bolsa Família Program.” Comparative Politics (Forthcoming).

Sugiyama, Natasha Borges. “Bottom-up Policy Diffusion: National Emulation of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Brazil.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism Vol. 42, no. 1 (Winter, 2012): 25-51. First published July 20, 2011, DOI: 10.1093/publius/pjr019.

Sugiyama, Natasha Borges. “The Diffusion of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs in the Americas.” Global Social Policy Vol. 11, no. 2/3 (December, 2011): 250-278.

Hunter, Wendy, and Natasha Borges Sugiyama. “Democracy and Social Policy in Brazil: Advancing Basic Needs, Preserving Privileged Interests.” Latin American Politics and Society Vol. 51, no. 2 (Summer, 2009): 29-58.

Sugiyama, Natasha Borges. “Ideology & Social Networks: The Politics of Social Policy Diffusion in Brazil.” Latin American Research Review Vol. 43, no. 3 (2008): 82-108.

Sugiyama, Natasha Borges. “Theories of Diffusion: Social Sector Reform in Brazil.” Comparative Political Studies Vol. 41, no. 2 (February, 2008): 193–216.