Bruno doesn't live up to Borat

Bruno, starring controversy maker Sacha Baron Cohen, explores the adventures of a flamboyant Austrian homosexual as he tries to find fame in America. The Austrian fashion expert gets fired from his TV show after a disastrous fashion show, which leads Bruno to travel to Los Angeles to rebuild his career.

Director: Larry Charles
Main Actors: Sacha Baron Cohen (Bruno), Gustaf Hammarsten
Length: 1 hour 23 minutes
Rating: C+

Bruno, starring controversy maker Sacha Baron Cohen, explores the adventures of a flamboyant Austrian homosexual as he tries to find fame in America. The Austrian fashion expert gets fired from his TV show after a disastrous fashion show, which leads Bruno to travel to Los Angeles to rebuild his career.

Bruno presented by Universal Studios and directed by Larry Charles falls short of expectations after the hilarious Cohen creation Borat. Revolving around the concept of shocking unsuspecting real life people sprinkled with plenty of cameos, this mix of script and unscripted style of film seems to miss the mark.

As with Cohen’s last film Borat, Bruno stands in a category of its own. Definitely a comedy, Bruno pushes the boundaries to the extreme in every aspect. Within the first twenty minutes of the movie, I found myself laughing uncontrollably, yet that didn’t seem to last. Cohen brings to light many important issues facing America like feels on homosexuality, which is arguably the hidden message within the movie.

The main characters of the film are Bruno (Sacha Baron Cohen) and his sidekick Lutz ( Gustaf Hammarsten). They travel from Austria all the way to L.A. to reclaim Bruno’s fallen fame. During his journey, he tries to assimilate to the star culture of America and concludes that he must become straight. This offers plenty of shocking laughs as Bruno goes as far as talking with homosexual converts.

The plot is simple yet interesting. The mix between acting and real life people presents a confusing twist, but follows the format of Cohen’s past acclaimed film Borat. The premise of Bruno finding his fame works well in the first half of the movie, but appeared to go dull afterwards.

The cinematography of the film was pleasantly simple. It lacked special effects which complemented the theme of realness in the movie. Some scene actually appeared to be shot in motion, as though running along side Bruno as angry crowds chased after him. There was a lot of real life motion shots and some instances where the camera operator was actually in the scene.

The writing complemented the style of the film well. It was simple dialogue between the two main characters through out the movie. The disappointing aspect with the dialogue was between the supposed cameos such as Paula Abdul for example. This interaction was suppose to be real and unscripted, yet it felt staged.

Overall, I thought the movie was filled with laughs, yet fell short of expectations. While trying to shock, Cohen seemed to let the movie go astray. There were times during the film were I lost interest and forgot what the film was supposed to be about. During the live scenes, it often felt that the scenes were staged which is very disappointing.

Compared to the loved Borat, where Cohen successfully pushed the envelope in every aspect, Bruno didn’t live up. I am not saying that the movie isn’t worth seeing though, just maybe wait till it comes out on DVD. It is worth every laugh and gasp. There were often times I found myself sitting with my mouth open due to Cohen’s crazy acts. Beware, there is an overload of frontal male nudity, which seems to only add to the shock value, an

blog comments powered by Disqus