Profile

Aaron Buseh, PhD, MPH, MSN

Aaron Buseh, PhD, MPH, MSN

Associate Professor

aaronbg@uwm.edu
(414) 229-5462
Cunningham Hall 569

Dr. Aaron Buseh is an Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing. Originally from Liberia, West Africa, Dr. Buseh completed graduate training in nursing and public health. He has over 15 years of experience in nursing and public health sciences. During his doctoral studies, he received the John E. Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health Minority International Research Training (MIRT) Fellowship sponsored by the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) College of Nursing World Health organization (WHO) Global Health Leadership Office (GHLO). Dr. Buseh completed his doctoral dissertation research in the area of sexual risk behaviors and HIV/AIDS prevention among adolescents in Swaziland, Southern Africa. Prior to joining the faculty at UWM, Dr. Buseh served as Visiting Research Specialist in Health Sciences at the GHLO at UIC where he collaborated with other scholars developing and implementing community-based participatory research projects.

Dr. Buseh’s overall goal of his program of research has been to conduct population-based research defined as a multidisciplinary effort aimed at reducing the effects of health disparities within ethnic minority communities. Being an African émigré living in two worlds drives the passion for his scholarship. The zeal to further examine and understand why systems throughout the world are unequal was born early in his life, where he observed first hand (through his nursing experiences in Liberia), disproportionate numbers of infants and children dying from preventable diseases. Thus, his career path has been dominated by the need to understand disparities and lead in “leveling the playing field” in the healthcare system for those populations that do not receive fair and equitable distribution of health benefits; but instead bear a disproportionate burden of morbidity and mortality. In both developing countries and in the US, certain population groups face greater challenges than the general population in accessing needed health care services, putting them at greater risk of poor physical, psychological, and social health. Thus, through his research, he relentlessly focus on exploring and understanding existing and emerging causal and mediating factors related to health inequities and disparities. He does so on two fronts—local and global—relative to two subpopulations: urban African Americans and African immigrants/refugees who now live in the Midwest United States. To this end, his research has specifically focused on the exploration and investigation of socio-cultural factors and structural system barriers adversely impacting the health and quality of life of disadvantaged and ethnic minority populations; specifically through doing comparative examinations between sub-Saharan Africans, African immigrants/refugees, and urban African Americans in metropolitan Milwaukee.

His health disparities research for those living with HIV/AIDS focuses on multidimensional constructs such as: illness and symptom experiences, social stigma, sexual risk behaviors, disclosure within interpersonal relationships, barriers to health care, and quality of life determinants. To examine these issues, he utilizes community-based participatory action research (CBPAR) and mixed methods approaches that help to build advocacy and policy based capacities for partnering community-based organizations (CBOs).

Two years ago, he expanded the breadth of his research with extramural funding from the Wisconsin Genomic Initiative (WGI). He served as principal investigator for the project with the purpose of exploring and examining socio-cultural implications of ethnic minority participation in genetic and genomic research, specifically bio-banking. Genetics and genomics science are rapidly emerging fields in healthcare and present many ethical legal, social, and moral dilemmas such as conversion of one’s own personal physical data and information for capture and use in  privately owned and operated  genomic research warehouses. The acceleration and advancement of clinical research in this area is not commensurate with the public’s knowledge about emergent technologies. Comparable socio-cultural research within ethnic minority communities as related to both HIV/AIDS and genetics carries similar stigma. Such stigmatic complexities and experiences affect the intention of ethnic minorities to collectively participate in genetic studies including as well as their individual willingness to provide consent to other clinically-based research—including HIV/AIDS initiatives.

In addition, Dr. Buseh’s scholarship is driven by the need to mentor both undergraduate and graduate in nursing and other disciplines, both of whom hold interests in his areas of research.  Using the educational motif embodied within the core values of the nursing profession, Dr. Buseh customizes health disparity based research apprenticeships for students at both the graduate and undergraduate degree levels. He helps integrate and re-introduce these core values (especially those of social justice and autonomy) into their research focus. To that end, he have personally tutored, supervised, and guided students on their degree paths.  Findings his HIV/AIDS research communal genetics study have been widely disseminated at multiple high-profile scientific nursing, public health, and interdisciplinary conferences such as the 2012 State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research and at the 2012 /2013/2014 Annual American Public Health Association (APHA) Conference(s).  Dr. Buseh is chairperson of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Institutional Review Board (IRB) and is recipient of multiple teaching, research, and alumni association awards from the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Education

Ph D Nursing Science, University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee
MSN Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago
MPH Public Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago
BSN Nursing, Cuttington University
Other Nursing, Phebe Hospital School of Nursing

Awards & Honors

2008 UWM Alumni Association Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD) Award
UWM Alumni Association
May 2008

UWM Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award
UWM
2007

Current Research

  1. A Model of Subjective Symptom Experience: Women Living with HIV/AIDS
    Manuscript under development
    Collaborators: Buseh, Aaron G; Plach, Sandra K; Stevens, Patricia
  2. Competing Continuation In-depth Longitudinal Study of HIV-Infected Women
    Collaborator: Buseh, Aaron G
  3. Exploring Future Nurses Attitudes and Beliefs Related to Childhood Obesity
    Collaborators: Snethen, Julia A; Buseh, Aaron G; Ruth
  4. Individual and Neighborhood Effects Associated with Stigma and Quality of Life among HIV-infected Urban African American Men
    Research Objective: Neighborhood characteristics are increasingly recognized as contextual factors necessary for understanding health, risk behaviors, disease patterns and treatment and prevention trajectories. This research uses a multidimensional approach to the understanding of quality of life among African American men living with HIV/AIDS by: (a) exploring and describing individual and neighborhood constructs influencing stigma and quality of life (QOL), and (b) developing and testing a model about the pathways of influence between individual and neighborhood factors in the experience of HIV stigma relative to QOL. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used to examine selected socio-demographic variables, their association and influence on the quality of life among a sample of urban African American males. Questionnaires were administered assessing: individual factors, neighborhood social disorder; self efficacy; social stigma and QOL. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Population Studied: Participants were recruited through a community-based organization in an urban setting a Midwestern state. A snowball sampling technique was used to obtain a sample of (n=117) African American men (18 years or older) who self-reported as being HIV-infected. Principal Findings: Participants ranged in age from 21 to 60 years (M=42.62, SD=8.25). The average length of time since diagnosis =13.17 years (SD=7.63). Over 75% of the men had at least a high school diploma. Over half identified their sexual orientation as bisexual or homosexual. Neighborhood effects, self efficacy, perceived stigma and current drug use were significantly correlated to QOL. Current drug users perceived more stigmas, less self efficacy and reported poorer QOL than non-drug users. Forty-one percent of the variance in QOL was explained by individual factors, neighborhood social disorder, self efficacy and stigma. Stigma mediated the effects of neighborhood social disorder on QOL and the domains of physical health and environment. Conclusions: Results from this study provide support for the need to recognize and address self efficacy, as well as stigma and neighborhood social disorder, including illicit drug use, to improve the quality of African American HIV-infected individuals’ lives. While focusing on clinical indicators of HIV disease and associated co-morbidities is undeniably necessary for improving quality of life for persons living with HIV/AIDS, it is not sufficient. We contend that a more multilevel conception of QOL is necessary, one that fully recognizes the large effects psychosocial and environmental variables such as self-efficacy, HIV stigma, and neighborhood social disorder can have in reducing quality of life for urban populations.
    Collaborators: Buseh, Aaron G; Stevens, Patricia
  5. Interpersonal and Attitudinal Factors Characterizing Patterns of Healthcare Utilization Among HIV-Infected Urban African American- Does it Matter?
    Abstract: Background: Patient-provider interactions take into consideration different aspects of care, including whether patients can get appointments in a timely manner, whether they feel valued and listened to, perceptions of their health care provider commitment, and whether they have a usual source of care. The aims of this study are to: (a) identify and describe healthcare utilization patterns and barriers to healthcare among HIV-infected African American men; (b) describe the interpersonal and attitudinal factors that characterizes perceived attitudes toward HIV healthcare providers; and (c) analyze relationships among selected participant factors and situational variables, and evaluating contributions of these factors and variables relative to the outcome variable (attitudes toward healthcare providers). Methods: A cross sectional design using a convenience sample of African American men (n=117) who self-reported as being HIV-infected recruited through a community-based organization. Survey questionnaires were administered to assess health care utilization patterns, stigma, general perceived self-efficacy, and attitudes towards health care provider. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests, followed by correlations and hierarchical multiple regression statistics. Findings: Sixty-seven participants (57.3%) indicated they did not seek health care when needed and sixty (51%) of the respondents indicated that they have missed at least one appointment with their HIV health care provider (HCP). Results revealed strong positive correlations between the HCP spending enough time with the patient, and the individual’s ability to access care when needed as indicated by the total Attitudes toward HIV Health Care Providers (AHHCP) scale, and the subscales of emotional support and professionalism. Participants perceiving lack of health care provider commitment and having been denied care when needed were negatively correlated to the total AHHCP scale and the subscales of professionalism and emotional support. Self efficacy was significantly correlated to the AHHCP total score and the subscale of emotional support. Examining the total AHHCP scale, health care utilization variables, stigma and self-efficacy explained 43.3% of the variance in the participant’s attitudes towards their HIV healthcare providers. Taking antiretroviral medications was a significant predictor for the total AHHCP scale and subscales of professionalism and emotional support. Conclusions: The data obtained from the current study provides important contextual perspectives on health care utilization barriers among HIV-infected African men in an urban setting. There are a number of interpersonal- attitudinal variables that emerged as factors that are associated with healthcare utilization patterns and perceptions towards health care providers that have implications for intervention with HIV-infected patients and for HIV healthcare providers. HIV treatment programs should embrace a holistic approach to health care—one that incorporates the patient in the plan of care and that would nurture trusting and positive patient-provider interactions.
    Collaborators: Buseh, Aaron G; Stevens, Patricia
  6. Subjective Illness Experience Narratives: Enhancing Understanding of Women Living with HIV Infection
    Manuscript
    Collaborators: Buseh, Aaron G; Plach, Sandra K; Stevens, Patricia
  7. Wisconsin Genomics Proposal
    Collaborators: Kunert, Mary P; Buseh, Aaron G; Lundeen, Sally P; Kako, Peninnah; Millon-Underwood, Sandra; Beth Peterman; Shakoor Lee; Jean Bell Calvin; Suzanne Feetham

Contracts & Grants

  1. Individual and Community Environment Effects on HIV Stigma in HIV-Infected African American Men
    Awarding/Sponsoring Organization: UWM Research Growth Initiative
    Investigators: Patricia Stevens,  Aaron G Buseh
  2. Individual and Environment Effects of HIV Stigma in HIV-Infected African American Men
    Awarding/Sponsoring Organization: UWM Graduate School Research Services and Administration Research Growth Initiative Award
    Investigator: Aaron G Buseh

Intellectual Contributions

  1. Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Aaron G Buseh,  S T Kelber,  Patricia Stevens,  L Townsend,  Enhancing the participation of African Americans in health-related genetic research: Findings of a collaborative academic and community-based research study., Nursing Research and Practice
  2. Julia A Snethen,  Ruth A Treisman,  Aaron G Buseh,  S T Kelber,  (2014) Exploring future nurses' attitudes and beliefs related to childhood overweight, Journal of Nursing Education, 53(9, Suppl.), S101-S105
  3. Aaron G Buseh,  S T Kelber,  Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Patricia Stevens,  L Townsend,  (2014) Knowledge, group-based medical mistrust, future expectations, and perceived disadvantages of medical genetic testing: Perspectives of black African immigrants/refugees., Public Health Genomics, 17(1), 33-42
  4. Aaron G Buseh,  Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Patricia Stevens,  L Townsend,  S T Kelber,  (2013) Black African immigrant community leaders' views on participation in genomics research and DNA biobanking., Nursing Outlook, 61(4), 196-204
  5. Aaron G Buseh,  Patricia Stevens,  Sandra Millon-Underwood,  L. Townsend,  S. T. Kelber,  (2013) Community leaders' perspectives on engaging African Americans in biobanks and other human genetics initiatives, Journal of Community Genetics, 4(4), 483-494
  6. Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Aaron G Buseh,  Patricia Stevens,  L. Townsend,  S. T. Kelber,  (2013) Reflections and perspectives of African-American community leaders regarding genetics and genomic research: Sentiment and wisdom of Sankofa., Journal of the Black Nurses Association, 24(1), 16-23
  7. Aaron G Buseh,  S. T. Kelber,  C. G. Park,  Patricia Stevens,  (2012) Neighborhood social disorder and stigma associated with quality of life among urban HIV positive African American men: A mediation model, Journal of the National Black Nurses Association, 23(2), 1-8
  8. Aaron G Buseh,  S T Kelber,  C G Park,  Patricia Stevens,  (2009) Interpersonal and attitudinal factors in healthcare utilization among HIV-infected urban African American men, Challenge: A Journal on African American Men, 16(1), 1-18
  9. Aaron G Buseh, (2008) Empowering Resilience: Improving Health Care Delivery in War-Impacted African Countries a Case Study of Liberia, University Press of America, 280
  10. Aaron G Buseh, (2008) Swaziland: A Cultural Health Assessment, C. D'Avanzo (Ed.) Mosby's Pocket Guide to Cultural Health Assessment 4th ed, 676-681
  11. Aaron G Buseh,  S. T. Kelber,  P. E. Stevens,  C. G. Park,  (2008) The relationship of symptoms, perceived health, and stigma with quality of life among urban HIV-infected African American men., Public Health Nursing, 25(5), 409-19
  12. Aaron G Buseh,  S. T. Kelber,  C. G. Park,  P. E. Stevens,  (2007) Impact of personal and structural factors on health related quality of life in urban HIV-infected African American males., Challenge: A Journal of Research on African American Men, 12(2), 15-29
  13. Aaron G Buseh,  P. E. Stevens,  P. McManus,  J. Addison,  Sarah Morgan,  Sandra Millon-Underwood,  (2006) Challenges and opportunities for HIV prevention and care: Insights from focus groups of HIV-infected African American men., Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 17(4), 3-15
  14. Aaron G Buseh,  P. E. Stevens,  (2006) Constrained but not determined by stigma: Resistance by African American women living with HIV., Women and Health, 44(3), 1-18
  15. Aaron G Buseh,  C. G. Park,  P. E. Stevens,  B. J. McElmurry,  S. T. Kelber,  (2006) HIV/AIDS stigmatizing attitudes among young people in Swaziland: Individual and enviromental factors., Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention in Children and Youth, 7(1), 97-120
  16. Aaron G Buseh,  S. T. Kelber,  Jeanne Hewitt,  P. E. Stevens,  C. G. Park,  (2006) Perceived stigma, self-rated health, and life satisfaction: Experiences of urban African American men living with HIV/AIDS., International Journal of Men's Health, 5(1), 35-51
  17. Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Aaron G Buseh,  M. K. Canales,  B. Powe,  B. Dockery,  T. Kather,  N. Kent,  (2005) Nursing contributions to the elimination of health disparities among African-Americans: Review and critique of a decade of research--Part 2, Journal of National Black Nurses Association, 16(1), 31-47
  18. Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Aaron G Buseh,  M. K. Canales,  B. Powe,  B. Dockery,  T. Kather,  N. Kent,  (2005) Nursing contributions to the elimination of health disparities among African-Americans: Review and critique of a decade of research--Part III., Journal of National Black Nurses Association, 16(2), 35-59
  19. Sandra Millon-Underwood,  Aaron G Buseh,  M. K. Canales,  B. Powe,  B. Dockery,  T. Kather,  N. Kent,  (2004) Nursing contributions to the elimination of health disparities among African-Americans: Review and critique of a decade of research. Part 1., Journal of National Black Nurses Association, 15(1), 48-62
  20. Aaron G Buseh, (2004) Patterns of sexual behaviour among secondary school students in Swaziland, southern Africa., Culture, Health, & Sexuality, 6(4), 355-367
  21. B. J. McElmurry,  S. J. Misner,  Aaron G Buseh,  (2003) Minority international research training program: Global collaboration in nursing research., Journal of Professional Nursing, 19(1), 22-31
  22. B. J. McElmurry,  C. G. Park,  Aaron G Buseh,  (2003) The nurse-community health advocate team for urban immigrant primary health care., Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 35(3), 275-281
  23. Aaron G Buseh,  Laurie K. Glass,  B. J. McElmurry,  (2002) Cultural and gender issues related to HIV/AIDS prevention in rural Swaziland: A focus group analysis., Health Care for Women International, 23(2), 173-184
  24. Aaron G Buseh,  Laurie K. Glass,  B. J. McElmurry,  M. Mkhabela,  N. A. Sukati,  (2002) Primary and preferred sources for HIV/AIDS and sexual risk behavior information among adolescents in Swaziland, Southern Africa., International Journal of Nursing Studies, 39(5), 525-538
  25. B. J. McElmurry,  Aaron G Buseh,  M. Dublin,  (1999) Health education program to control asthma in multiethnic, low-income urban communities: The Chicago Health Corps Asthma Program., Chest, 116(4, Suppl. 1), 198S-199S

Presentations

  1. Individual and Neighborhood Effects Associated with Stigma and Quality of Life among HIV-infected Urban African American Men
    Event: Academy Health Policy Annual Research Conference
    Presenter: Aaron G Buseh
    June 27, 2010
  2. Private Suffering Versus Public Symptoms: Illness Narratives from HIV-Infected African American Men
    Event: The Sixth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry (QI2010)
    Presenters: Aaron G Buseh,  Patricia Stevens
    May 26, 2010
  3. Ethnic and Gender Disparities in HIV Risk
    Event: Center for AIDS Research Post Doctoral Fellows Research Seminar Series 2008
    Presenter: Aaron G Buseh
    November 6, 2008
  4. Global Climate Change and its Effects on Health and Social Well-Being of Populations
    Event: 2008 Wisconsin Nurses Association, Environmental Health Nursing Coalition Pre-Conference "Moving from Local to Global: Health and Climate Change"
    Presenter: Aaron G Buseh
    October 16, 2008
  5. Symptom Prevalence, Perceptions of Health, and Social Stigma on Health-Related Quality of Life Among Urban HIV-Infected African American Men
    Event: The Center for Addiction and Behavorial Health Research
    Presenters: Aaron G Buseh,  S.T. Kelber,  C.G. Park,  Patricia Stevens
    October 26, 2007
  6. Private Suffering Versus Public Symptoms: Narratives from a Sample of HIV-infected African American Women
    Event: The 5th Biennial Conference of the International Society of Critical Health Psychology
    Presenters: Aaron G Buseh,  Patricia Stevens
    July 2007
  7. Impact of Civil Conflicts on Public Health and Health Care Systems
    Event: Global Studies Summer Institute "Peace and Conflict: Global to Local Connections in Teaching and Learning
    Presenter: Aaron G Buseh
    July 27, 2007
  8. Symptom Prevalence, Experience and Functional Status Among Urban HIV-infected African American Men
    Event: Midwest Nursing Research Society 30th Annual Conference
    Presenters: Aaron G Buseh,  S.T. Kelber,  C.G. Park,  Patricia Stevens
    March 2007
  9. Social Stigma, Provider Engagement, and Health Related Quality of Life Among HIV-infected African American Men
    Event: 34th Annual Institute and Conference of the National Black Nurses Association/ Promoting Improved Patient Health Outcomes by Integrating Nursing Education, Research, and Practice
    Presenters: Aaron G Buseh,  S. Kelber,  C.G. Park,  Patricia Stevens
    August 14, 2006
  10. Contextual and Health Systems Factors on Health Related Quality of LIfe of HIV-infected Urban African American Men
    Event: Annual Research Meeting and Conference of Academy Health
    Presenters: Aaron G Buseh,  S T Kelber,  C G Park,  Patricia Stevens
    June 2006

Contact

aaronbg@uwm.edu
(414) 229-5462
Cunningham Hall 569

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