University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

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AstroBreaks

Fall 2015 Shows

AstroBreaks are free planetarium shows from 12:15-12:45 p.m. on select Wednesdays. All are welcome!

Each program includes a description of the night sky and some of its treasures, along with exploration of a special astronomical topic.


September 9 – Re-creating the Universe in 48 hours
Speaker:  Postdoctoral Researcher, Dr. Astrid Lamberts
>Find out how scientists use supercomputers to model our universe: galaxies, clusters and the whole cosmic web. Learn what we have discovered so far and how we have improved technology which will lead to even more discoveries.
 
September 16 – Pluto & New Horizons
Speaker: Director, Dr. Jean Creighton
>Find out about Pluto’s status and what NASA's New Horizons tells us about this surprising world.
 
September 23 – History of Radio Astronomy
Speaker: Associate Professor, Dr. David Kaplan
>Learn how astronomers turned from fighting the Nazi’s to uncovering a whole new way of seeing the Universe.
 
September 30 – Dark matter and Dark Energy: the Differences
Speaker: Graduate Student, Debnandini Mukherjee
>One of the current astronomical questions we need to answer is what is the nature of the ingredients that make the bulk of our cosmos: dark energy and dark matter.
What we see with our telescopes is just the frosting on the cake. Find out what the difference is between dark matter and dark energy.
 
October 7 – Discovering the Cosmic Web
Speaker: Associate Professor, Dr. Dawn Erb
>Galaxies are not distributed randomly in space — instead they live in clusters and superclusters, separated by voids of emptiness. Learn how astronomers use observations and computer simulations to discover the structure of the universe.
 
October 28 – Space, time, and space time
Speaker: Distinguished Professor Dr. John Friedman
>The Copernican revolution led to Galileo's understanding that we don't know what it means to be at rest -- to be at the same place at two different times. With the idea that light was a vibration of a material that filled the universe -- the ether -- Michelson and Morley tried to use light to regain absolute space by finding the rest frame of the ether.  They failed, and the failure spelled the end of absolute time: Different observers disagree on what events occur at the same time.

November 4 – Celestial Images I
Speaker: Director, Dr. Jean Creighton
>Part of a series of talks based on a collaboration between the American Geographical Society Library and the UWM Planetarium to discuss the history and artistry of star maps and to highlight some superb examples we have in our own Special Collections. The first program will emphasize how star charts were used to map the sky and how they evolved over time.

November 11 – Celestial Images II
Speaker: Director, Dr. Jean Creighton
>Part of a series of talks based on a collaboration between the American Geographical Society Library and the UWM Planetarium to discuss the history and artistry of star maps and to highlight some superb examples we have in our own Special Collections. The second program will show how styles of star maps can reflect scientific and/or philosophical view points.

November 18 – Celestial Images III
Speaker: Director, Dr. Jean Creighton
>Part of a series of talks based on a collaboration between the American Geographical Society Library and the UWM Planetarium to discuss the history and artistry of star maps and to highlight some superb examples we have in our Special Collections. The third program will show how specific heavenly bodies and celestial phenomena were depicted up to 1900.

December 2 – How big is the Universe I
>First in a two-part series of programs by groups of UWM undergraduate students in Theatre 260 who will use storytelling techniques to relate to the audience the size of our cosmos.

December 9 – How big is the Universe II
>Second in a two-part series of programs by UWM undergraduate students in Theatre 260 who will use storytelling techniques to relate to the audience the size of our cosmos.



Archive of past Astrobreaks.