Incremental

Friday, November 15, 2013

Time: 4:30pm
Location: Architecture and Urban Planning Building 170

See the entire Fall 2013 SARUP Lecture/Exhibition/Symposium SeriesDownload Arcobat Reader(PDF:154k)

“Incremental” presentation by R. Shane Williamson, Founding Partner, Williamson Chong, Toronto, Canada; Associate Professor of Architectural Design and Computing, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
For more information about this speaker’s visit, contact Adjunct Professor Sebastian Schmaling.

Bio: R. Shane Williamson is a principal at Williamson Chong Architects and an Associate Professor of Architectural Design and Computation at the University of Toronto’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. Williamson’s research and teaching involves an exploration of the digitally based convergence of representation and production afforded through parametric software and digital fabrication platforms. The creative practice of Williamson Chong ranges from furniture and installations to master plans and buildings, with a particular emphasis upon employing advanced digital tools as a means to engage architectural craft as expressed through the synthesis of emerging technologies with traditional methods of construction.

Shane Williamson has been awarded the 2006 Young Architects Prize from the Architecture League of New York, the 2008 Ronald J. Thom Award for Early Design Achievement from the Canada Council for the Arts, a 2010 Award of Excellence from the Ontario Association of Architects, a 2010 Design Exchange Award, a 2011 North American Wood Design Award, and a 2011 Canadian Architect Award of Excellence. Most recently, Williamson Chong was named as the recipient of the 2012 Professional Prix de Rome.

Lecture Summary: R. Shane Williamson will present the recent work of Williamson Chong Architects as reflected in the notion of “Incremental Urbanism,” which recognizes the possibilities of intensification latent in the morphology of urban fabric.