About Living and Studying in Milwaukee
Frequently Asked Questions about Urban Planning

What are the advantages of studying urban planning in a city like Milwaukee?
Where is the campus located in the city?
What special amenities does Milwaukee have to offer as a place to live?
Return to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What are the advantages of studying urban planning in a city like Milwaukee? 

A number of advantages arise from studying planning in a city like Milwaukee. First, the size of the city is large enough to provide students with an opportunity to study first-hand the issues and problems associated with large urban areas. A large metro area like Milwaukee's affords a large number of opportunities for internships and class projects. The area provides learning opportunities in both older redeveloping contexts and newer, fast-growth suburban contexts. As with any big city, cultural diversity is another advantage. Faculty, clients for class projects, and students represent a wide range of backgrounds, experiences, and values.

Where is the campus located in the city? 

The campus is located in the northeast corner of the City of Milwaukee, just 5 blocks from Lake Michigan, and two miles north of Milwaukee's downtown. The residential and commercial areas adjacent to the campus are known for the high quality of urban living that they offer. While some of the cities most exclusive addresses are within walking distance of campus, affordable housing for both singles and families is located within walking, biking, or a short bus or car ride of the campus.

What special amenities does Milwaukee have to offer as a place to live?
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Our students take advantage of the largest employment market in the state, featuring nearly 2 out of every 3 jobs in WI, with internships and other professional opportunities. The Milwaukee area also offers a superb learning resource for students. Many courses include class projects that allow students the opportunity to learn on real problems in the Milwaukee area. The program's partnerships with planning clients has been cited as a model of university-community engagement. The City of Milwaukee, and the surrounding area, also offers a number of amenities for living and working. Milwaukee is an accessible city, with only moderate levels of traffic congestion and an excellent bus transit system. Housing prices are relatively stable and are generally more moderate than one would find in many cities of the same size. Milwaukee is known as a city of neighborhoods, each with its own distinct history and culture. East side neighborhoods near the UWM campus are especially known for their urban flavor, featuring restaurants, bars and clubs, bookstores, and unique shops.

The county park system including over 15,000 acres of parkland, miles of preserved lakefront, a world-class zoo, and over 90 miles of paved trails winding through parks' is recognized as one of the outstanding assets of the area. Milwaukee boasts professional sports, including a new baseball stadium and basketball arena, and a host of collegiate athletics' not the least of which is UWM's own Panthers, with nationally ranked basketball and soccer teams. The theater district in downtown Milwaukee offers the symphony, two opera companies, a ballet company and other dance troupes, a repertory theater, and a range of other performing arts. The Milwaukee Art Museum just expanded its facility with a dramatic new addition designed by Santiago Calatrava. For weekend getaways, Chicago, Madison, and popular Door County are all within a two-hour drive. Summers in Milwaukee means festivals, kicked off by the ten-day Summerfest (a food and music extravaganza attracting over 1 million visitors), followed by ethnic festivals of all sorts at the Milwaukee Summerfest grounds at the lakefront. For more information about Milwaukee and things to do, check out http://www.onmilwaukee.com/