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Zero Net Energy Policies and Projects - UW-Extension Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center

Commercial Projects

Location: Australia, Melbourne
Name: Pixel Building
Type: Commercial Office
Builder: Grocon
Design: Studio 505

Summary:

Completed in July 2010, the four story, 12,228 SF building is LEED Platinum certified and has achieved a 6 Star Green Star Design rating, the highest rating awarded by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). The building's array of façade panels reduces solar heat gain along with a full-height glazed curtain wall. Heating/cooling is supplied through an underfloor air displacement system fed by a thermally active radiant slab system in ceilings. Additionally, an absorption heat pump generates hot or chilled water for heating or cooling, respectively. The building's vacuum-flush toilet system feeds into an anaerobic digester, which collects solid waste to produce methane gas that can be used for heating domestic hot water. Electricity is provided by a combination of fixed and tracking solar PV panels, totaling 6.45 kW and three 1.5 kW vertical axis wind turbines.

The Pixel building's performance was at zero net energy for 2012

Sources: http://www.zinio.com/reader.jsp?issue=416228481&o=int&prev=si
http://www.gbca.org.au/green-star/green-building-case-studies/pixel/13600.htm


Location: California, Agoura Hills
Name: Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Headquarters
Type: Commercial Headquarters
Builder: MATT Construction and Bigelow Development Associates
Design: Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP (

Summary:

The 22,240 SF office building, completed October 2012, is Phase 1 of 4 of Conrad N. Hilton Foundations new 70 acre campus. A thin floor plate running east/west maximizes passive solar design and daylighting. A passive downdraft HVAC system with no fans uses thermal buoyancy to drive ventilation into raised floor plenums where it is either moved over cooling coils or heated, then exhausted out through digitally controlled clerestory windows. There is a water cooled chiller system with a cooling tower and a solar thermal heating system with 1,000 SF of evacuated tubes and a 3,000 gallon storage tank. All domestic hot water and 70% of hot water heating are generated from this system supplemented by a backup electric boiler. An 11,000 SF solar PV array provides 115 kW of electricity annually. Electric car charging is provided as well. The building has daylight sensors and an active exterior shading system on the southwest façade that raises or lowers when outside air exceeds 80° F.

Data on building performance will be available Fall 2013.

Sources: http://www.mattconstruction.com/project-detail/conrad-n.-hilton-foundation
http://www.hiltonfoundation.org/newcampus


Location: California, Corte Madera
Name: Learning Resource Center (LRC) at Marin Country Day School
Type: School, K-8
Builder: Oliver & Company
Design: EHDD Architecture

Summary:

Completed in 2009, the 13,600 SF building that houses the library and a technology classroom is LEED Platinum certified. The building is a passive solar design with strategically located overhangs, low-e glass and deep louvers, and operable windows and skylights allowing passive ventilation. A solar chimney facilitates stack-effect cooling. A greywater system includes a 15,000 gallon cistern below-grade that pumps water through an in-floor radiant cooling system. A roof-mounted evaporative cooling tower supplements the radiant system. In addition, a 95.5 kW PV array lines the roofs of classroom buildings to provide electricity for the LRC. A digital energy-monitoring system is used as a teaching tool and incorporated into the school's curriculum.

Data of the LRC's performance is expected to become available in Spring 2013.

Sources: http://greensource.construction.com/green_building_projects/2010/1009_Marin_Country_Day_School.asp
http://www.tippingmar.com/projects/project_details/35


Location: California, Davis
Name: UC-Davis West Village
Type: Mixed Use Community
Builder: UC-Davis and West Village Community Partnership, LLC

Summary:

Largest planned ZNE development in the United States. 130-acre site will house 3,000 students, faculty and staff in 662 apartments and 343 single-family houses. Includes 42,500 SF of commercial space and 75,000 SF Community College Center. The development is being built in phases. Energy efficiency of all completed buildings is 50% below code. Passive solar energy design with roof overhangs and sunshades specific to solar exposure of each building. A 4 MW solar PV system on roofs and parking canopies is expected to meet all remaining energy needs for the entire development. Biodigestion is being explored to satisfy additional energy needs as the final phases of the project are built out.

Smart energy monitoring and controls through web portal and smartphone apps. Rent includes a fixed amount of electricity and water with added fees for excess usage.

One third of the project was completed fall 2011, with 800 residents in 315 apartments. Phase I of the Community College Center opened January 2012, at 20,000 SF accommodating 2,000 students for classes.

Sources: http://westvillage.ucdavis.edu/


Location: California, El Cerrito
Name: El Cerrito Recycling and Environmental Resource Center
Type: Municipal recycling center
Builder: Pankow Builders
Design: Noll & Tam Architects, ZETA Communities

Summary:

Completed in April 2012, the 2,200 SF center that houses the city Environmental Services division offices and recycling drop-off center is 48% below code for energy use and has applied for LEED certification at the platinum level. It is daylit with 16-foot clerestory windows and occupancy sensors. Energy-saving features include a dual-zone heating system and a TPO cool roof. Electricity from a 10 kW PV system provides all electricity for the office building and 30% of the site energy.

Sources: http://www.ebsconsultants.com/portfolio/el-cerrito-recycling-center-net-zero/
http://ca-elcerrito.civicplus.com/index.aspx?NID=533


Location: California, Rohnert Park
Name: Environmental Technology Center (ETC)
Type: Laboratory, Higher Education
Builder: McCarthy Building Companies, Inc.

Summary:

The ETC at Sonoma State University is a 2200 SF building used by faculty, students, and community members for academic study, research training, and collaboration on environmental projects. The building is 50% below code for energy use. Daylit and naturally ventilated with skylights, clerestories, and manually operable windows. Structurally insulated panel (SIP) construction. The building uses passive solar heating/cooling, a trombe wall, and thermal mass provided by concrete masonry units. Awnings, shades, and a living-canopy trellis cool the building in summer. A 3 kW rooftop PV system provides electricity. Hydronic radiant heat provides backup heating.

As of 2013, the building is energy positive producing 130% of the energy that it uses.

Sources: http://www.sonoma.edu/etc/about/index.html
http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/overview.cfm?projectid=247


Location: California, San Francisco
Name: Pier 15 Exploratorium
Type: Museum, Observatory, Restaurant, and Retail
Builder: Nibbi Brother
Design: EHDD

Summary:

Pier 15 Exploratorium in San Francisco is a museum designed to be zne at 51% below code in energy efficiency with solar electric generation on site. In an historic district on the waterfront, the bay water, at 50 to 65 degrees, is used for radiant heating and cooling. The Exploratorium uses extensive daylighting. Plug loads are minimized through detailed analysis, design and work with staff to change usage patterns. A 40% reduction in plug loads will allow the Exploratorium to achieve zero net energy. The 1.3 MW solar PV system on the large roof area includes 5,874 SunPower solar modules in ten zones that produced ~ 2,100 kWh of electricity used on site in the first year. Including state and federal grant funds for solar, the projected payback for the PV system is 10 years.


Location: California, San Jose
Name: IDeAs Z2 Design Facility
Type: Commercial Office
Design: EHDD Architecture; Tipping-Mar + Associates, Structural engineer; Hillhouse Construction, General Contractor

Summary:

The IDeAs Z2 Design Facility is a renovation of a 6,560 square foot 1960 building that is net zero energy with zero carbon emissions. Z2 is fossil fuel free for heating, cooling and electricity. Energy consumption is ~60% below ASHRAE 90.1. This low energy use is achieved with daylighting, automatic lighting controls, occupancy sensors, high efficiency office equipment, and a high-efficiency HVAC system featuring radiant floor heating and cooling and a ground-source heat pump. The building has an integrated, net-metered, grid-tied roof mounted 30-kW PV system that provides more than 100% of energy used. Other features include: electrochromatic glass that darkens automatically, a photocell in the East windows, and a PV sunshade on the South windows to reduce summertime solar heat gain. Water consumption is reduced through waterless urinals, dual flush toilets, high-efficiency faucets, and drought tolerant landscaping.

As of 2012, the facility is achieving net zero energy use.

Sources: http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/overview.cfm?projectid=1346
http://www.z2building.com/z2data.php


Location: Canada, Vancouver, BC
Name: University of British Columbia's Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS)
Type: Multi-Use Facility
Builder: Heatherbrae Builders
Design: Professor John Robinson and Architects Busby Perkins + Will

Summary:

CIRS is a 61,000 SF building with spaces for teaching, learning and research. Occupied September 2011, it is projected to have energy efficiency 63% below code. Passive design strategies allow regularly occupied spaces to be completely daylit and naturally ventilated. A seasonally varying vegetated screen covers the western side of the building to help control glare and heat gain. Remaining sides use a curtain wall with solar shades, which support a 25 kW PV system that is expected to provide 10% of the building's electrical needs.

Mechanical heating/cooling is provided by heat recovery coils attached to the lab exhaust of the neighboring Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) building, heat recovery coils located in the CIRS exhaust air stream and ground source heat pumps. A 430 SF evacuated tube array supplements the heat pumps to provide water heating. Actual operational data will be compared to energy model output after one year of data is available.

As of 2013 the building is not performing at zero net energy. Improvements are being made on metering and performance.

Sources: http://cirs.ubc.ca/


Location: Colorado, Golden
Name: Research Support Facility (RSF) of the US DOE National Renewable Energy Lab
Type: Commercial Office
Design: RNL, sustainable design, Denver office; Stantec Consulting, engineering; Haselden Construction

Summary:

The 222,000 square foot Research Support Facility on NREL's campus is designed to be a zero net energy and LEED platinum office building with 880 employees and a large data center. Completed summer of 2010, it was designed to be 50% more energy efficient than an office building built to commercial code. The building, through a power purchase agreement, supports a 1.6 MW rooftop and carport photovoltaic system designed to generate 32,000 Btu's per square foot per year to meet RSF's energy needs. Additionally, it incorporates transpired solar walls to preheat incoming air. Energy efficiency is achieved first through the design- long narrow floor plates with south facing windows to maximize daylighting. An under-floor air distribution system, radiant and evaporative heating and cooling water piping, natural ventilation, precast insulated panels and an energy efficient data center are other energy efficient strategies.

Taking advantage of the local soil and weather conditions, they constructed an underground concrete thermal labyrinth to capture daytime heat or nighttime coolness and store the energy to warm or cool down the building. In the winter, the labyrinth will draw and store heat from the computers in the building's data center and from warm air produced by the transpired air collector. Evaporative chillers running cold water backed up as needed by a central chilled water plant will cool down RSF's green data center. This system uses water and doesn't need to use mechanical heating, cooling or chemical refrigerants. RSF was constructed for $259 per square foot -- a comparable price among area commercial projects.

In Spring 2013, the final PV system was connected to the grid generating an additional 2,534 kW of energy annually. It will be known if the building is performing at zero net energy by May 2014.

Sources: http://www4.uwm.edu/shwec/zeronetenergy/Pubs/NREL_LEEDRSF.pdf
http://www.nrel.gov/sustainable_nrel/rsf.html
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/tech/2010/07/09/nr.intv.zero.energy.building.cnn
http://www.sustainablefacilitiessummit.com/evaluating-the-promise-of-net-zero-buildings-myth-or-reality/


Location: Colorado, Grand Junction
Name: Wayne Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse
Type: Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse
Builder: Beck Group
Design: Westlake Reed Leskosky

Summary:

This 41,562 SF, 1918 courthouse was renovated into a zero-net energy LEED Platinum certified building. Completed January 2013, it has 32 GeoExchange wells 475 feet deep that allow the building to reject or absorb heat to the ground, depending on demand. A high-efficiency HVAC system is tied to the GeoExchange system filters. New insulation and storm windows with a solar film covering allowed down- sizing heating/cooling equipment. Low-flow plumbing fixtures reduce water use by approximately 40% less than a typical building. Roof and canopy-mounted PV systems generate 123 kW of electricity. The one-year performance period to verify ZNE performance began April 2013.


Location: Connecticut, New Haven
Name: Kroon Hall (at Yale)
Type: Commercial Office, Higher Education
Builder: Turner Construction Co., Inc.
Design: Hopkins Architects, MEP Lighting Engineers, MEP & Lighting Engineers: ARUP

Summary:

Home to Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Kroon Hall was designed with the goal of being carbon neutral. The LEED Platinum certified 69,000 SF building contains commercial offices, classrooms, an auditorium, and an Environment Center. Its long, narrow envelope and building mass with southern exposure is designed for maximum daylighting and solar gain, with energy use 60% below code. A 105 kW, roof-mounted PV array provides ~25% of the building's electricity. Hot water is provided by an evacuated tube solar hot water system. Heating demand is met by four geothermal wells. Other energy efficient features include low-e glass, occupancy and daylight sensors, heat recovery ventilation and evaporative cooling. A color-coded notification system prompts occupants to open operable windows when efficient for natural ventilation.

As of 2012, Kroon imports energy to meet net zero, purchasing renewable energy credits (RECs) to offset associated emissions for the building, depending on the annual budget.

Sources: http://environment.yale.edu/kroon/
http://greensource.construction.com/green_building_projects/2009/0909_Kroon-Hall.asp


Location: Delaware, Camden
Name: Camden Friends Meeting House
Type: Quaker Meeting House
Builder: DEBoss Enterprises, Inc.
Design: Re:Vision Architecture

Summary:

Restoration of the 1805 Meeting House and new construction of the conference center (2,864 SF total) was completed in 2009 and is 50% below code for energy use. The meeting house has Passive solar design with high efficiency foam insulated walls and structurally insulated panel (SIP) roof achieving R-30 walls, R-48 roof. It has a closed-loop ground source heat pump and tankless water heater. A 12 kW roof-mounted PV array meets the building's electricity needs.

The project was awarded the Zero-Net Energy Award in 2011 by the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA).

Sources: http://revisionarch.com/Projects.php?view=a&id=60
http://www.nesea.org/awards/zero-net-energy-building-award/past-entrants/


Location: Florida, Fort Lauderdale
Name: TD Bank
Type: Bank
Builder: Turner Construction

Summary:

Completed May 2011, TD Bank's 3,970 SF building was designed to be 50% more energy efficient than their previous design standard. Solar PV panels on drive through canopies and roof are expected to produce a total of 86 kW of electricity. The well-insulated building features skylights and clerestories for daylighting coupled with sensors and controls to automatically dim interior lights.

Sources: http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/overview.cfm?ProjectID=2037


Location: Hawaii, Kailu-Kona
Name: Hawaii Gateway Energy Center (HGEC)
Type: Commercial Office
Builder: Bolton, Inc.
Design: Ferraro Choi and Associates, Ltd.

Summary:

The 3,600 SF visitor complex houses offices, support areas, and a multi-purpose space to be used for conferencing, displays, and education. The building is LEED Platinum certified and a 2007 AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Project for its passive design strategy that dramatically reduces the need for electrical power. Energy efficiency is 80% below code. Occupied spaces are entirely daylit with lighting fixtures controlled by occupancy sensors used in the evening. Through passive thermal chimneys, heated air is exhausted through stacks while fresh outside air is pulled into the building from a underfloor plenum and drawn across cooling coils, filled with deep-pumped seawater. This system eliminates the need for a mechanical air conditioning system. Electricity is provided by a 20 kW rooftop PV system.

As of 2012, the building's annual electricity production has been 110-115% of its annual electricity usage since monitoring began in 2007.

Sources: http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/overview.cfm?projectid=592
http://www2.aiatopten.org/hpb/overview.cfm?ProjectID=592


Location: Hawaii, Waimea
Name: Hawaii Preparatory Academy Zero Plus Energy Lab
Type: School, K-12
Design: Flansburgh Architects

Summary:

The 6,000 SF facility, which includes classrooms, conference rooms, and a workshop, has achieved both LEED Platinum and Living Building Challenge (LBC) certifications. It is among the first three LBC certified projects. LBC certified projects are both zero net energy and zero net water, certified only after one year of performance data documenting that the modeled goals are met. This passive solar, naturally ventilated building has automated window louvers and uses a Tropical 3 Pitch Roof that cools outdoor spaces and captures cool air for indoor ventilation. There is also a radiant cooling system tank below grade instead of air conditioning. Electricity is supplied by a 26 kW PV system comprised of 3 types of panels on the roof and as an awning. Annual electricity generated by the system is 38,994 kWh while the facility uses 19,090 kWh/yr. Excess electricity is delivered to the school's grid to provide electricity for other buildings. Students monitor energy input and output information as well as CO2 and other variables from 480 sensors that feed into a lab control room.

Sources: http://www.hpa.edu/academics/energy-lab/about-lab
https://ilbi.org/lbc/casestudies/HPAenergylab/energy


Location: Indiana, Chrisney
Name: Lincoln Heritage Public Library
Type: Library
Builder: Craftsman Construction
Design: Browning Day Mullins Dierdorf Architects

Summary:

The 2,400 SF passive solar design building was completed in April 2009. High-performance windows and foam insulation creates a tight building envelope, achieving R-25 walls, R-35 roof. A thermal slab floor and ground source heat pump meet heating demand. Additional features include a solar hot water heater, solar light tubes for daylighting, and occupancy sensors. An 8.9 kW roof-mounted PV system meets electricity demand. The library's website features a "Sunny Portal" which users may use to view instantaneous updates of electricity usage and yield from the PV system.

Sources: http://www.lincolnheritage.lib.in.us/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=81&Itemid=88
http://www.bdmd.com/images/pdf/IBJ-Chrisney-Library-BDMD-Architects-Article.pdf
http://www.sunnyportal.com/Templates/PublicPageOverview.aspx?plant=3c8e6630-4117-4d73-a8c2-bf526ec49541&splang=en-US.


Location: Kentucky, Bowling Green
Name: Richardsville Elementary
Type: School, K-12
Design: Sherman Carter Barnhart Architecture

Summary:

Completed in 2010, the 72,285 SF insulated concrete form (ICF) construction building is 75% below code for energy efficiency. The building is daylit with clerestory windows and light shelves, solar tubes, and skylights. Heating is provided by a geothermal system. A 300 kW roof-mounted PV array meets electricity demand. Students can monitor the system's geothermal and solar PV performance as well as water conservation and quantity of materials recycled from school computers and gauges.

As of 2012, the building is performing at net-zero.

Sources: http://www.scbarchitects.com/our-work/k-12-education/elementary-schools/richardsville-elementary-school
http://schooldesigns.com/Project-Details.aspx?Project_ID=3244


Location: Maryland, Belcamp
Name: McCormick & Company Distribution Center
Type: Distribution Center, Warehouse, Industrial

Summary:

Electricity use in the 363,000 SF building was reduced by 55% through an overhaul of lighting and air-handling systems. This included HVAC upgrades and energy efficient conveyors with motion sensors. Lighting costs were cut by 75% through installation of energy efficient interior and exterior lights coupled with occupancy sensors. A leased 1.8 MW rooftop PV system is owned and maintained by Constellation Energy. A solar services agreement with Constellation provides electricity at a fixed cost less than market rates.

Between February 2011-February 2012, the solar arrays have met the building's electricity demand and produced an excess of 16,000 kWh.

Sources: http://www.environmentalleader.com/2012/04/17/mccormick-distribution-center-achieves-net-zero-energy-status/
http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2012-04-14/features/bs-gr-netzero-energy-20120414_1_energy-efficiency-solar-panels-renewable-energy


Location: Minnesota, St. Paul
Name: Science House at the Science Museum of Minnesota
Type: Multi-use facility
Contact: Pat Hamilton, Global Change Initiatives Director, hamilton@smm.org
Builder: LS Black Constructors, Inc.

Summary:

The 1,690 SF building is used as an experiment facility, classroom, and special event space for the Science Museum of Minnesota's outdoor science park. Passive solar design with energy efficiency 60% below code. Daylit and naturally ventilated with spray-foam insulation levels of R-25 walls, R-35 roof. Ground source heat pumps provide heating/cooling and domestic hot water. An 10.2 kW PV system provides electricity.

From 2004-2010, total energy production exceeded consumption. Usage data is not yet available for 2011-2012.

Sources: http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/overview.cfm?projectid=284
http://buildingdata.energy.gov/content/science-house-science-museum-minnesota?print


Location: Missouri, Eureka
Name: Living Learning Center (at Tyson Research Center)
Type: Higher Education
Builder: Bingman Construction Co.
Design: Hellmuth & Bicknese Architects

Summary:

The 2,968 SF passive solar design building, completed in 2009, is certified under the Living Building Challenge (LBC). LBC certification is granted after one year post-occupancy data is submitted that includes zero net energy performance. Building design includes orientation and overhangs/awnings to limit solar gain and 100% daylit spaces. Enhanced building insulation, high efficiency window glazing, efficient lighting with photo and occupancy sensors, energy efficient equipment and low plug loads minimize energy use. Variable volume air handling with heat recovery, demand control ventilation, and operable windows. A 20.3 kW PV system includes roof collectors and two horizontal trackers.
The school's curriculum for summer programs uses building features as teaching tools. Live solar outputs can be viewed online.

In 2012, the Living Learning Center had a net import of 8,467kWh. The building generated 18,163 kWh, while it's usage was 26,630 kWh.

Sources: http://www.aashe.org/resources/case-studies/getting-net-zero-energy-lessons-learned-living-building-challenge
http://tyson.wustl.edu/llc/index.php


Location: Oregon, Salem
Name: Painters Hall at Pringle Creek
Type: Café and community center
Builder: Spectra Construction
Design: Opsis Architecture

Summary:

The 3,400 SF renovated industrial building is LEED Platinum certified and has earned Petal Recognition for energy, beauty and equity from the Living Building Challenge. This project generates energy for its use and for the adjacent neighborhood. The gut rehab includes cellulose insulation, passive ventilation through operable windows and vents and motion sensors and dimmers on lighting. A ground-source heat pump provides heat. A 20.2 kW roof-mounted PV array provides electricity. Excess solar electricity is used to pump well water through the surrounding neighborhood's geothermal loop, which offsets the HVAC energy needs for 77 homes. Energy monitoring equipment measures and displays the building's total consumption, PV production, and individual circuit loads. The building has been net zero or net positive energy since 2010.

Sources: http://www.opsisarch.com/wp-content/uploads//PringleCreekPaintersHallCaseStudy.pdf
http://www.pringlecreek.com/news/Santana_SolarToday_SeptOct10.pdf


Location: Texas, El Paso
Name: Paisano Senior Housing Community
Type: Senior Living Community
Builder: Pavilion Construction
Design: Wokrshop8

Summary:

Completed in 2012, the 55,200 SF Paisano Senior Housing Community, which consists of four 3-story buildings with 73 residential units, laundry, 2-story community center and support facility, is the first zero net energy, LEED Platinum public hosing community in the nation. Paisano's renewable energy sources include two 10kW wind turbines and a 165 kW rooftop solar array. Energy saving features include north and south facing windows, shade canopies, air-source heat-pump water heaters and EnergyStar appliances. Resident training and legislated local net metering rate as incentives combined are being tracked to determine actual energy needed. Results will show whether additional PV needs to be installed.

Real performance results will not be measurable until more than a full year of occupation has passed in early 2014.

Sources: http://greensource.construction.com/green_building_projects/2013/1307-paisano-green-community.asp
http://www.pavilionconstruction.com/featured-projects/paisano-green-community---el-paso-tx/


Location: Texas, Irving
Name: Lady Bird Johnson Middle School
Type: School, grades 6-8
Builder: Balfour Beatty Construction
Design: Corgan Associates, Inc.

Summary:

The 150,000 SF school became operational in August 2011. The building is well insulated and daylit, supplemented with light shelves, automatic dimming features on light fixtures, and motorized roller shades used to manage heat gain. It has high efficiency glazing, rain water collection and grey water harvesting. Heat is provided through ground source heat pumps. A 550 kW solar PV array paired with 2.4 kW wind turbine meet electricity needs. Computers are all laptops with a wireless network. The school is used as a teaching tool physically and with the energy and water systems data captured on an on line monitoring system. As of 2012, energy monitoring shows the school produces as much energy as it consumes.

Sources: http://irvingisd.net/education/components/docmgr/download.php?sectiondetailid=18333&fileitem=5796


Location: Utah, Salt Lake City
Name: Salt Lake City Public Safety Building
Type: Public Safety Building
Builder: Okland Construction
Design: GSBS Architects

Summary:

Opened July 2013, Salt Lake City's Public Safety Building contains 172,000 SF of program area and 143,000 SF of secure parking, with approximately 30,000 SF of PV panel over the entry canopy and on the main roof. Solar thermal helps heat water for the sinks and locker rooms. Energy efficiency features include: building orientation to maximize natural light; louvers over windows to direct natural sunlight into the building; daylight sensors; in-floor radiant tubes for heating and cooling; and elevators with regenerative drives. Equipment loads are reduced with energy efficient equipment, power strips with occupancy sensors, energy efficient servers with virtual server software and energy monitoring systems. An employee behavior program will be implemented to promote low energy usage.

Zero net energy performance will be available in fall of 2014.


Location: Vermont, Putney
Name: The Putney School Field House
Type: Commercial
Builder: William Maclay Architects

Summary:

16,800 square foot field house of a college preparatory boarding high school was occupied November 2009 and is LEED platinum certified.

Energy usage is designed to approximately 45% below Vermont Energy Code. There are 36.8 KW of solar-tracking photovoltaics in field next to building. Energy features include: super insulated envelope, detailing to avoid air infiltration and thermal bridging, triple insulated, low-e, operable windows, sky lighting for approximately 40% of floor area, occupancy, daylight and CO2 sensors, automatic natural ventilation ( windows on night time flushing) and air to air heat pumps. Energy monitors will display energy use and generation to students and faculty.

In its first year the Field House used 48,374 kWh of electricity, nearly 3,000 fewer kWh than the PV system produced. As of 2012, the building has been operating slightly better than net zero, producing an average of 5% more electricity than it uses on an annual basis.

Sources: http://www.putneyschool.org/content/fieldhouse-green-features
http://contractormag.com/green-contracting/Putney-net-zero-field-house-1234/


Location: Washington, DC
Name: Commercial Building Initiative (CBI)
Type: Commercial

Summary:

US DOE Database of Commercial NZEB's:

- Aldo Leopold Legacy Center, Baraboo, WI
- Audubon Center at Debs Park, Los Angeles, CA
- Challengers Tennis Club, Los Angeles, CA
- Environmental Tech Center, Sonoma State University (CA)
- Hawaii Gateway Energy Center, Kailua-Kona, HI
- IDeAs Z2 Design Facililty, San Jose, CA
- Oberlin College Lewis Center, Oberlin, OH
- Science House, St. Paul, MN

Sources: http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/


Location: Washington, Seattle
Name: Bullitt Center
Type: Commercial Office
Builder: Schuchart Construction
Design: Point32

Summary:

The six-story, 50,000 SF office building, opened May 2013 and is designed to be carbon neutral. It features a public resource center on energy efficiency and urban sustainability. It is designed to be 83% more efficient than similar high rise office buildings in the area using techniques including daylighting, positioning office desks within 30 ft of windows, sealing the building with a liquid-applied air barrier, limiting elevator access while providing a staircase with views, metering down the socket-level and no on-site parking. Tenants are given an energy and water budget to fulfill zero-energy and zero-water goals. A 14,303 SF rooftop solar PV array is expected to meet electricity demand by producing 240,000 kW hours annually. A kiosk with real time performance information is featured in a public exhibition space. The Bullitt Center is seeking Living Building Challenge certification after one year of occupancy (May 2014) verifying its performance at zero net energy and water.

Sources: http://bullittcenter.org/
http://www.point32.com/
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/04/seattles-bullitt-center-opens-today-as-worlds-greenest-office-building.html


Location: Wisconsin, Baraboo
Name: Aldo Leopold Legacy Center
Type: Commercial Office
Builder: Oscar J. Boldt Construction
Design: The Kubala Washatko Architects, Inc.

Summary:

Three, single-story buildings totaling 12,000 SF. Functions as classroom, meeting room, exhibit hall, library, workshop, and offices. Net zero energy and carbon neutral building. Energy efficiency at 70% below code. First carbon-neutral building LEED Platinum certified. The 39.6 kW PV system generates 60,000-70,000 kWh of electricity annually, which is 10% over projected energy consumption. Ground source heat pumps for heating/cooling and earth tubes for ventilation. Additional winter heating provided by wood-burning stoves and fireplaces, using on-site wood.

Sources: http://www.aldoleopold.org/Visit/leopoldcenter.shtml
http://www.aiatopten.org/hpb/overview.cfm?ProjectID=946


Location: Wisconsin, Madison
Name: Full Spectrum Solar
Type: Business Office
Builder: Full Spectrum Solar
Design: Glueck Architects

Summary:

Full Spectrum Solars office and shop is home to a 10KW photovoltaic system that produces 12,500 kWh annually or 60% more electricity than the building requires. An additional 1.56kW PV system is mounted on awnings shading the south-facing windows and powering the companys electric vehicle. Energy saving features include clerestory windows, super-insulated walls and ceiling, a motion activated on-demand hot water recirculation system and a high-efficiency condensing boiler with radiant heat. Summer cooling needs are met through a nighttime ventilation system and ductless zoned air conditioning system.

Sources: http://www.fullspectrumsolar.com/aboutus_shop.html