Multicultural Knowledge of Mental Health Practices

Core Certificate Requirements:

All certificate students are required to complete COUNS 704 and 705 (for 6 credits), and three of six elective population-specific courses (for 9 credits). Students may not transfer credits into the certificate program. Online modules are designated in each course and students will be able to proceed through the modules at their own pace. Students will interact with the instructor through e-mail, virtual office hours, or by posting questions and responses in a D2L discussion site. Successful completion of each module will be demonstrated by 80% correct responses on each module exam. All modules must be successfully completed by the end of the academic semester (i.e. 15-week semester).

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Course Descriptions: Core courses COUNS 704: Multicultural Guidelines: Overview and Ethics. (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts in multicultural psychology and how they interact to shape the individual. Concepts such as oppression, power and privilege, social class, ethnic identity development, gender role socialization, discrimination, microaggressions, acculturation/assimilation, racism, ageism, ableism, and their manifestations are presented. Particular attention is given to how many of these factors influence worldview, contribute to marginalization, as well as to disparities in education, work, and health.

COUNS 705: Multicultural Practice: Awareness and knowledge of others. (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of and knowledge related to mental health practices of individuals from diverse cultural groups. Modules in the course will cover information related to ethical multicultural practice; understanding the client/patient within his/her cultural context; and understanding culturally-appropriate diagnosis, assessment, and interventions.

Population-specific courses (3 credits each) COUNS 740: Multicultural Mental Health Guidelines: Working with Latinos

This course is designed to familiarize you with essential information about the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States consisting of demographic, historical, sociopolitical, and geographic contexts that are critical to understanding the population as well as the diversity within. Specific concepts and frames of reference such as identity, acculturation, language, family values, religion and spirituality, traditional beliefs about health and illness, gender role socialization, and social class are discussed. Attention will be given to contemporary issues facing Latinos, including a discussion of factors that influence help-seeking and receiving care.

COUNS 741: Multicultural Mental Health Guidelines: Working with LGBT populations

This course is designed to provide students with multicultural mental health information as it pertains to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) population in the United States. Course modules will address areas related to demographics, historical factors, and sociopolitical issues for LGBT communities and their influence on mental health. Specific concepts such as LGBT identity, intersection of multiple identities, cultural values, health issues, and social class are discussed. Attention will be given to influential contemporary issues and practice considerations.

COUNS 742: Multicultural Mental Health Guidelines: Working with Asian Americans

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and knowledge related to mental health practices of individuals of Asian descent living in the United States. Modules in the course will cover information related to demographic, historical, and sociopolitical factors for Asian Americans and their influence on mental health treatment. Topics will include educational and population factors, acculturation, language, sociopolitical history, cultural values, health care orientation, and treatment.

COUNS 743: Multicultural Mental Health Guidelines: Working with African Americans

This course is designed to provide students with multicultural mental health information as it pertains to African Americans in the United States. Course modules will address areas related to demographics, historical factors, and sociopolitical issues for African Americans and their influence on mental health. Specific concepts such as identity, acculturation, cultural values, religion and spirituality, traditional health beliefs, gender role socialization, and social class will also be discussed. Attention will be given to influential contemporary issues and practice considerations.

COUNS 744: Multicultural Mental Health Guidelines: Work with First Nations

This course is designed to familiarize you with essential pan-cultural information about the mental health issues facing the First Nations populations in North America. First Nations populations include those also generally referred to as American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native American Indians. Demographic, historical, sociopolitical, and inter- and intra-ethnic contexts critical to understanding the First Nations will be addressed. Specific knowledge constructs such as identity formation, acculturation, enculturation, language, family and community values, religion and spirituality, traditional beliefs about health and illness, gender role socialization, and social class are emphasized. Attention will be given to contemporary issues facing the First Nations that influence service delivery and the receipt of care. Culturally-relevant interventions will also be presented.

COUNS 745: Multicultural Mental Health Guidelines: Working with Men

This course will provide an overview of: (a) recent advances made in understanding how the traditionally socialized male gender role affects the lives of men, and (b) therapeutic techniques based on such advances which allow counselors to work with such men from a gender role sensitive perspective. An integral aspect of this course will be the extensive use of demonstrations and role-plays aimed at increasing the student’s ability to interact with and be therapeutically efficient with male clients from diverse backgrounds.

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Admissions requirements:

Students will be admitted on a continuous basis. Post-master's students will submit a transcript and letter of intent. Students currently in a graduate program will submit a transcript, letter of intent and must demonstrate a minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA. Students are sought from a wide variety of disciplines, and thus, there is no specific background required for the program. Please note that transfer credits will not be accepted.

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Continuation and Exit Requirements:

Students will take exams in each module. Students must complete the exam in each module with at least an 80% correct response rate to move to the next module. Courses 1 and 2 will have quizzes for all four modules. Students may repeat the quiz until they pass it, but all modules must be completed successfully by the end of the semester or the student fails the course.

Courses 1 and 2 (COUNS 704 and 705) must be completed successfully to enroll in any of the elective courses. The population-specific courses will have quizzes for each of four modules and responses to a provided case study as the capstone requirement. Students will receive Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory as a final grade in each course.

Contingent upon completion of program requirements (15 credits) the Program Coordinator and the Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology will give final approval of the Certificate in Multicultural Knowledge of Mental Health Practices.

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