Communication Sciences & Disorders

Welcome from Chair Dr. Carol H. Seery


Carol H. Seery

On behalf of the faculty and staff from Communication Sciences and Disorders, I welcome you. This discipline is focused on speech, language and hearing sciences that are fundamental to professional careers in speech-language pathology or audiology. Our academic foundations include the study of normal processes of human communication and its development, as well as a broad range of impairments.

Speech-language pathologists diagnose and treat individuals with disorders related to:  articulation, language, voice, stuttering, and swallowing, while audiologists diagnose and treat individuals with disorders related to the: auditory system (i.e., hearing loss and deafness) and vestibular system (i.e., balance). Careers in speech-language pathology or audiology are ideal for individuals who are attentive, perceptive and caring people.  These professionals analyze and address communication disorders through the integration of anatomical, physiological, neurological, developmental, behavioral, psychological, and sociocultural knowledge.

Our department has a long history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). Its early roots can be traced back to 1947 when Professor Catherine Zimmer taught classes in speech and hearing for the Milwaukee State Teacher’s College. A decade later when the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee was established, Professor Zimmer’s courses were housed in the Department of Speech. In 1975, the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology was among the first units to form the college that was then named the UWM School of Allied Health Professions. In 1991, the department changed its name to Communication Sciences and Disorders, and in 2002, the overarching school was renamed the College of Health Sciences.

Our graduate program is typically ranked among the top third of the 250 speech-language pathology programs evaluated by US News and World Report. We provide assessment and intervention for communication disorders in the UWM Speech and Language Clinic that serves as a training site for our students and a resource for the community. In collaboration with the Center for Communication Hearing and Deafness (CCHD), we provide hearing evaluations and auditory rehabilitation programs through the UWM Community Audiology Services (CAS).

Students in our program enjoy the opportunity to learn at these practice settings, and appreciate the expert instruction they receive from clinical supervisors and academic faculty along the way. They develop collegial peer relationships in a strong, long-standing pre-professional organization, the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA). This organization creates connections for speech-language pathology students both locally and globally, as well as sponsoring various activities and community service projects.

I invite you to explore CHS's Communication Sciences and Disorders program. Should you have any questions, please contact me directly at cseery@uwm.edu.

Carol H. Seery, Ph.D., CCC-SLP